Category Archives: VPN

More than Half of Android apps ask for dangerous permissions. Is yours among?

By John Mason

It wasn’t very long ago that I revealed that most free VPN services are provided as a front for the big corporations running them to collect user that. Spurred by the findings of that study, I decided to dig deeper to see how much of a threat, especially when it comes to user data, Android VPN […]

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: More than Half of Android apps ask for dangerous permissions. Is yours among?

"Hide My Ass" Comes Out of Hiding


The Internet has a chequered history with the humble ass. Kim Kardashian attempted to “break the Internet” with hers, and now we see VPN service “Hide My Ass” sold for
£40 million to AVG. This subscription driven VPN service is an interesting case study. Many VPN services are surprisingly coy about where they get their revenue, and about why they exist. HMA, on the other hand, are pretty up front: It was started as a way to bypass school filters, and it is subscription based. It’s nice to see the articles finally showing what we’ve long known - these services are, in the main, used for bypassing school or workplace filtering, and not only by oppressed revolutionaries in a far off land. Nor is Hide My Ass a way to avoid the long arm of the law, they have, in the past, given up users’ browsing details under court orders. What of other VPN providers - the “free” ones? Even subscription supported HMA admit freely they use affiliate marketing schemes to help keep the cost of plans down - what are the others doing to support the cost of bandwidth? Selling data, perhaps? For those with client software, they could be inspecting your secure connections! There’s even been cases where proxy/VPN software has inserted malware. Our advice - block ‘em all - and think twice if you are a user attempting to connect to a VPN service. Despite the name, and the youth of its creator, HMA is a pretty grown-up VPN system - the others, well - who knows?
 

Security: Hard to Get Right!

Couple of interesting articles doing the rounds this week, which are worthy of a quick comment!

Heartbleed: the bug that keeps on giving
Reports suggest that the Heartbleed vulnerability was involved in a breach of over 4 million records from a health provider in the US — we won't see many of these, as identifying the culprit as Heartbleed is really difficult in most cases. That instances like this are still cropping up reminds us of the need to ensure we're patched, and not just in the obvious places like a web server. This time it seems to have been SSL VPN at the heart of the issue, so to speak.

Passwords: why are we still so rubbish at this?
Apparently 51% of people share a password. This is properly daft. Really, crazier than a box of weasels. Even if you trust the other person, there's no telling what accidents might occur, or where they may re-use that password themselves. I always get gyp from my wife that I won't tell her my passwords, but I won't — and believe me, I do pretty much everything else she tells me!

EU "right to be forgotten" rule still here, still a waste of time?!
Internet numptys are still asking Google to remove them from searches in their droves. Happily the BBC is kind enough to reveal who they are by linking us to the relevant articles. When will people realise that once you publish something on the Internet, it is there forever. Unless it's that really useful document you bookmarked last week, which now 404s and was never in the Internet archive. Yes, that one.