Category Archives: Threat Research

Recent MuddyWater-associated BlackWater campaign shows signs of new anti-detection techniques

This blog was authored by Danny Adamitis, David Maynor, and Kendall McKay

Executive summary

Cisco Talos assesses with moderate confidence that a campaign we recently discovered called “BlackWater” is associated with suspected persistent threat actor MuddyWater. Newly associated samples from April 2019 indicate attackers have added three distinct steps to their operations, allowing them to bypass certain security controls and suggesting that MuddyWater’s tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) have evolved to evade detection. If successful, this campaign would install a PowerShell-based backdoor onto the victim’s machine, giving the threat actors remote access. While this activity indicates the threat actor is taking steps to improve its operational security and avoid endpoint detection, the underlying code remains unchanged. The findings outlined in this blog should help threat hunting teams identify MuddyWater’s latest TTPs.

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Threat Roundup for May 3 to May 10

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between May 3 and May 10. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More at Talosintelligence.com


Reference
TRU05102019–┬áThis is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

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Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple bugs in several Jenkins plugins

Jenkins is an open-source automation server written in Java. There are several plugins that exist to integrate Jenkins with other pieces of software, such as GitLab. Today, Cisco Talos is disclosing vulnerabilities in three of these plugins: Swarm, Ansible and GitLab. All three of these are information disclosure vulnerabilities that could allow an attacker to trick the plugin into disclosing credentials from the Jenkins credential database to a server that they control.

In accordance with our coordinated disclosure policy, Cisco Talos worked with Jenkins and the associated companies to ensure that these issues are resolved and that updates are available for affected customers.

Read more over at the Talos blog here.

The post Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple bugs in several Jenkins plugins appeared first on Cisco Blog.

Threat Roundup for April 26 to May 3

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between April 26 and May 03. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

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Qakbot levels up with new obfuscation techniques

Qakbot, also known as Qbot, is a well-documented banking trojan that has been around since 2008. Recent Qakbot campaigns, however, are utilizing an updated persistence mechanism that can make it harder for users to detect and remove the trojan. Qakbot is known to target businesses with the hope of stealing their login credentials and eventually draining their bank accounts. Qakbot has long utilized scheduled tasks to maintain persistence. In this blog post, we will detail an update to these schedule tasks that allows Qakbot to maintain persistence and potentially evade detection.

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