Category Archives: squid

Friday Squid Blogging: Robot Squid Propulsion

Interesting research:

The squid robot is powered primarily by compressed air, which it stores in a cylinder in its nose (do squids have noses?). The fins and arms are controlled by pneumatic actuators. When the robot wants to move through the water, it opens a value to release a modest amount of compressed air; releasing the air all at once generates enough thrust to fire the robot squid completely out of the water.

The jumping that you see at the end of the video is preliminary work; we're told that the robot squid can travel between 10 and 20 meters by jumping, whereas using its jet underwater will take it just 10 meters. At the moment, the squid can only fire its jet once, but the researchers plan to replace the compressed air with something a bit denser, like liquid CO2, which will allow for extended operation and multiple jumps. There's also plenty of work to do with using the fins for dynamic control, which the researchers say will "reveal the superiority of the natural flying squid movement."

I can't find the paper online.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

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Friday Squid Blogging: Humbolt Squid in Mexico Are Getting Smaller

The Humbolt squid are getting smaller:

Rawley and the other researchers found a flurry of factors that drove the jumbo squid's demise. The Gulf of California historically cycled between warm-water El Niño conditions and cool-water La Niña phases. The warm El Niño waters were inhospitable to jumbo squid­more specifically to the squid's prey­but subsequent La Niñas would allow squid populations to recover. But recent years have seen a drought of La Niñas, resulting in increasingly and more consistently warm waters. Frawley calls it an "oceanographic drought," and says that conditions like these will become more and more common with climate change. "But saying this specific instance is climate change is more than we can claim in the scope of our work," he adds. "I'm not willing to make that connection absolutely."

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

Friday Squid Blogging: When the Octopus and Squid Lost Their Shells

Cephalopod ancestors once had shells. When did they lose them?

With the molecular clock technique, which allowed him to use DNA to map out the evolutionary history of the cephalopods, he found that today's cuttlefish, squids and octopuses began to appear 160 to 100 million years ago, during the so-called Mesozoic Marine Revolution.

During the revolution, underwater life underwent a rapid change, including a burst in fish diversity. Some predators became better suited for crushing shellfish, while some smaller fish became faster and more agile.

"There's a continual arms race between the prey and the predators," said Mr. Tanner. "The shells are getting smaller, and the squids are getting faster."

The evolutionary pressures favored being nimble over being armored, and cephalopods started to lose their shells, according to Mr. Tanner. The adaptation allowed them to outcompete their shelled relatives for fast food, and they were able to better evade predators. They were also able to keep up with competitors seeking the same prey.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.