Category Archives: Security Awareness

U.S. Coast Guard Releases Cybersecurity Measures for Commercial Vessels

Have you ever seen the bridge of a commercial cargo shipping vessel? It is like a dream come true for every kid out there–a gigantic PlayStation. Unfortunately, maritime computer systems are also attractive to malicious cyber actors. Illustrating this interest by malicious individuals, the U.S. Coast Guard issued a safety alert warning all shipping companies […]… Read More

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How Do You Protect Your Children When They Go Online?

When you are thinking about a very special holiday gift for your kid, one of the first things that spring to mind is a smartphone, tablet or laptop. It’s common knowledge that these devices aren’t very useful unless connected to the Internet. But how do you make sure your children are on the safe side […]… Read More

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75% of organisations have been hit by spear phishing

Phishing scams aren’t as compelling as some of the more sophisticated attacks that you read about. But their prosaic nature is part of what makes them so concerning.

After all, every unusual email you receive could be a phishing scam, whether it’s an account reset message from Amazon or a work request from your boss.

And evidence shows that attacks like this will happen regularly and in incredibly convincing ways. For example, Proofpoint’s Understanding Email Fraud Survey has found that 75% of organisations had been hit by at least one spear phishing email in 2018.

Spear phishing is a specific type of phishing attack in which criminals tailor their scams to a specific person. They do this by researching the target online ­– often using information from social media – and by imitating a familiar email address.

For example, if the target works at ‘Company X’, the attacker might register the domain ‘connpanyx’ (that’s c-o-n-n-p-a-n-y-x rather than c-o-m-p-a-n-y-x), hoping that the recipient won’t spot the difference.

You might think that would be easy enough to notice, but scammers are adept at hiding the signs of their scams.

Sustained threat of spear phishing

Proofpoint’s report found that 41% of organisations suffered multiple attacks in a two-year span, suggesting that those that fell victim once were likely to do so again.

It also found that only 40% of organisations have full visibility into email threats, meaning those organisations are being targeted regularly and simply aren’t aware of the scale of the threat.


See also:


Commenting on the report, Robert Holmes, vice president of email security products at Proofpoint, said:

“Email fraud is highly pervasive and deceptively simple; hackers don’t need to include attachments or URLs, emails are distributed in fewer volumes, and typically impersonate people in authority for maximum impact.

“These and other factors make email fraud, also known as business email compromise (BEC), extremely difficult to detect and stop with traditional security tools. Our research underscores that organizations and boardrooms have a duty to equip the entire workforce with the necessary solutions and training to protect everyone against this growing threat.”

Phishing is a top concern

Clearswift’s Cyber Threatscape report also highlights the threat of phishing. The information security organisation polled 600 decision makers and 1,200 employees in the UK, US, Germany and Australia, and found that 59% of respondents said phishing was their biggest concern.

Phishing was the number one risk in all four regions, beating out the threat of employees’ lax attitudes (33%), the vulnerability of removable devices (31%) and failure to remove login access from ex-employees (28%).

According Dr Guy Bunker, senior vice president of products at Clearswift, this report “highlights that businesses need to change the way they’re approaching the task of mitigating these risks”.

“The approach should be two-fold, focused on balancing education with a robust technological safety net. This will ultimately help ensure the business stays safe,” he adds.

How can you prevent phishing attacks?

There are several ways you can address the risk of phishing. The first is to conduct staff awareness courses to educate employees on how phishing scams work and what they can do to mitigate the risk.

These courses should be repeated annually to refresh employees’ memories and maintain a workplace culture that prioritises cyber security.

You may also benefit from a thorough re-evaluation of your approach to cyber security. Our Security Awareness Programme does just that, helping you generate tangible and lasting improvements to your organisation’s security awareness.

It combines a learning needs assessment to identify the areas that your organisation should focus on, with a series of tools and services to address problems as they arise, including hands-on support from a specialist consultant, pocket guides and e-learning courses.

Find out more about our Security Awareness Programme >>


A version of this blog was originally published on 9 April 2018.

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From the BH Consulting archives: fake invoicing scams are a constant security risk

Trawling through archives can quickly turn bittersweet when it hits home how little has changed between past and present. Looking back through the posts on BHconsulting.ie, invoice redirect scams have featured regularly since 2015. Fast forward to 2019: An Garda Siochana warned that this fraud cost Irish businesses almost €4.5 million this year. The global costs are even more sobering – but more of that later.

Back in 2015, we reported the Irish Central Bank was fleeced to the tune of €32,000. This fraud was a growing trend even then. Our blog quoted Brian Honan’s Twitter account: “Looks like a fake invoice scam we’ve seen with other clients”. The same post also referred to Ryanair, which was duped around the same time and reportedly lost around €4.5 million.

The impersonation game

Scams like this have many names, like CEO fraud, invoice redirection fraud, or business email compromise. Preventing them from being successful is about knowing how they work and spotting potential red flags. Brian blogged about this in December 2015, detailing scammers’ steps when executing CEO fraud and fake invoicing tricks.

“The premise of the attack is the criminals impersonate the CEO, or other senior manager, in an organisation (note some attacks impersonate a supplier to the targeted company). The criminals may do this by either hijacking the email account of the CEO or setting up fake email accounts to impersonate the CEO.”

Next, criminals send an email seeming to come from the CEO to a staff member with access to the company’s financial systems. The email will request that payment be made to a new supplier into a bank account under the criminals’ control. Alternatively, the email may claim the banking details for an existing supplier have changed and will request payments into a new bank account under the criminals’ control.

Video to beat the scam

In February 2017, we blogged about an educational video that Barclays Bank developed to raise awareness of fake invoicing and similar online scams.

 

Later that same year, we covered the issue again, twice in quick succession. The first of these posts, in August 2017, noted how legitimate email senders do themselves no favours by composing messages that “practically begged to be treated” as fakes. A genuine email from a large insurer was so poorly composed that it would have raised suspicion with anyone who’d been paying attention during security awareness training.

The process problem

Now we’re getting to the heart of the problem. Call it what you want, but this scam is a people and process failure. That was our conclusion from another post in August 2017, after news emerged of yet another victim in Ireland. “The effectiveness of an email scam like CEO fraud relies on one person in the target organisation having the means and the opportunity to make payments. It’s not a security problem that technology alone can fix.”

In the same blog, we noted how the FBI has been tracking this scam since 2013. The agency put collective losses between then and August 2017 at an eye-watering $5 billion. As we blogged then, ways to fix this issue don’t necessarily need to involve technical controls. For example, companies could make it compulsory to have a second signatory whenever they need to make payments over the value of a certain amount.

The risk of these frauds goes beyond just commercial businesses. As we noted in a blog from October 2017, local public sector authorities are also potential victims. The post referred to Meath County Council, which had €4.3 million stolen from it in a dummy invoicefraud.

Staying ahead of the fraudsters

Our August blog included FBI special agent Martin Licciardo’s very practical advice: “The best way to avoid being exploited is to verify the authenticity of requests to send money by walking into the CEO’s office or speaking to him or her directly on the phone. Don’t rely on e-mail alone.”

This brings us neatly back to 2015, where we provided similar advice to avoid falling victim to fake invoice scams. The steps include:

  • Ensure staff use secure and unique passwords for accessing their email
  • Ensure staff regularly change their passwords for their email accounts
  • Where possible, implement two factor authentication to access email accounts, particularly when accessing web-based email accounts
  • Have agreed procedures on how requests for payments can be made and how those requests are authorised. Consider using alternative means of communication, such as a phone call to trusted numbers, to confirm any requests received via email
  • Be suspicious of any emails requesting payments urgently or requiring secrecy
  • Implement technical controls to detect and block email phishing, spam, or spoofed emails
  • Update computers, smartphones, and tablets with the latest software and install up-to-date and effective anti-virus software. Criminals will look to compromise devices with malicious software in order to steal the login credentials for accounts such as email accounts
  • Provide effective security awareness training for staff.

The post From the BH Consulting archives: fake invoicing scams are a constant security risk appeared first on BH Consulting.

Upcoming cybersecurity events featuring BH Consulting

Here, we list upcoming events, conferences, webinars and training featuring members of the BH Consulting team presenting about cybersecurity, risk management, data protection, GDPR, and privacy. 

ISACA Last Tuesday: Dublin, 25 June

BH Consulting COO Valerie Lyons will present a talk on building an emotionally intelligent security team, and the role that leadership plays in influencing team style. It will be an interactive and fun session with several takeaways and directions to free online tools to help analyse team member roles. The evening event will take place at the Carmelite Community Centre on Aungier Street in Dublin 2. Attendance is free; to register, visit this link

Data Protection Officer certification course: Vilnius/Maastricht June/July

BH Consulting contributes to this specialised hands-on training course that provides the knowledge needed to carry out the role of a data protection officer under the GDPR. This course awards the ECPC DPO certification from Maastricht University. Places are still available at the courses scheduled for June and July, and a link to book a place is available here

IAM Annual Conference: Dublin, 28-30 August

Valerie Lyons is scheduled to speak at the 22nd annual Irish Academy of Management Conference, taking place at the National College of Ireland. The event will run across three days, and its theme considers how business and management scholarship can help to solve societal challenges. For more details and to register, visit the IAM conference page

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Security awareness training: a constant in a changing world

There are two schools of thought when it comes to users and cybersecurity. Some people working in the industry think of users as the weakest link. We prefer to see them as the first line of defence. Cybersecurity training programmes can address staff shortcomings in knowledge, promote positive behaviour and equip non-experts with enough information to be able to spot potential threats or scams.

In our previous post, we looked back through the BH Consulting blog archives to trace the evolution of ransomware. This time, we’ve gone digging for a less technical threat. Instead, it’s a constant challenge for any infosec professional: security awareness.

Training shortfall

Back in April 2014, we reported on a survey which found that just 44 per cent of employees received cybersecurity training. David Monahan, research director with Enterprise Management Associates, summed up the issue perfectly:

“Without training, people will click on links in email and release sensitive information in any number of ways. In most cases they don’t realise what they are doing is wrong until a third-party makes them aware of it. In reality, organisations that fail to train their people are doing their business, their personnel and, quite frankly, the Internet as a whole a disservice because their employees’ not only make poor security decisions at work but also at home on their personal computing devices as well.”

One year later, little had changed. In a post from April 2015, Lee Munson covered a survey by SpectorSoft of 772 IT security professionals. “Not only do many firms have staff who lack even a basic level of security awareness they often, as the report concludes, have poorly trained staff too, with many of the survey respondents citing a lack of expertise as being a significant problem in terms of defending against insider threats.”

Accidents will happen

At least the post acknowledged that damage can sometimes be the result of accidental actions. Too often, security vendors throw around phrases like ‘insider threat’ that, intentionally or not, tar all user actions as malicious.

But could it be that some people are just naturally more susceptible to spilling the beans? Another post from April 2015 reported on a study from Iowa State University that claimed to spot which people are likely to fall for social engineering tricks that cybercriminals often use. It did this by analysing brainwaves. People with low levels of self control were more likely to reveal confidential information like company secrets, the researcher observed.

That’s not, admittedly, an approach many companies could take in practice, but it couldn’t hurt to ask some targeted questions at interview stage.

In June of that year, a UK Government survey found that the number of breaches had increased year on year. The findings also showed that more businesses large and small were providing ongoing security awareness training to their staff compared to the previous year. Despite that, many of the organisations surveyed also saw an increase in staff-related security breaches during the same period.

Must try harder

As Lee Munson wrote: “While budgets and technical controls obviously come into play and affect an organisation’s ability to protect its digital assets, the human aspect still appears to be the area requiring the most work. Staff training and awareness programmes are known to be effective but many companies do not appear to have leveraged them to their full potential.”

Another post put the need for cybersecurity training and awareness squarely into perspective. Security company Proofpoint showed the extent to which attackers aim for an organisation’s human resources rather than its technical defences. Its report found that people still click on 4 per cent of malicious links they find in emails. BH Consulting’s regular blogger Lee Munson found this to be a surprisingly high figure. “Attackers employ psychology to improve the chances of their attacks succeeding,” he wrote.

And if at first you don’t succeed? A post from early in 2016 suggested a radical approach to poor security behaviour: disciplinary measures. The blog quoted a survey by Nuix which determined that human behaviour was the biggest threat to an organisation’s security. It said corporations would tolerate risky behaviour less, and would likely penalise staff who “invite a data breach”. That’s one way to “encourage” people to show better security behaviour.

Communication breakdown

Lee rightly raised the question of whether companies have sufficiently communicated their security policies and procedures in the first place. “So, if companies (including yours) are going to penalise employees for not being up to date on all of their security policies, who is going to police the writing and dissemination of those documents in the first place?”.

The message is that security policies need to be clear, so that even a non-technical member of staff can:

  • Understand them
  • Act on them
  • Remember them.

Taken as a whole, the blogs show that while cybersecurity training is a valuable exercise, it’s got to be delivered in a way that the intended audience will understand.

The post Security awareness training: a constant in a changing world appeared first on BH Consulting.

Security roundup: May 2019

We round up interesting research and reporting about security and privacy from around the web. This month: password practice, GDPR birthday, c-suite risk, and further reading for security pros.

Passwords: a good day to try hard

No self-respecting security pro would use easy passwords, but could they say the same for their colleagues (i.e. everyone else)? The answer is no, according to the UK National Cyber Security Centre. It released a list of the 100,000 most hacked passwords, as found in Troy Hunt’s ‘Have I Been Pwned’ data set of breached accounts. Unsurprisingly, ‘123456’ topped the list. A massive 23 million accounts use this flimsy string as “protection” (in the loosest possible sense of the word). Next on the list of shame was the almost as unimaginative ‘123456789’, ‘qwerty’, ‘password’ and 1111111.

The NCSC released the list for two reasons: firstly to prompt people to choose better passwords. Secondly, to allow sysadmins to set up blacklists to block people in their organisations from choosing any of these terrible passwords for themselves. The list is available as a .txt file here and the agency blogged about the findings to give more context. Help Net Security has a good summary of the study. The NCSC published the research in the buildup to World Password Day on May 2, which Euro Security Watch said should be every day.

WP Engine recently performed its own analysis of 10 million compromised passwords, including some belonging to prominent (and anonymised) victims. It makes a useful companion piece to the NCSC study by looking at people’s reasons for choosing certain passwords.

Encouraging better security behaviour through knowledge is one part of the job; effective security controls are another. In April, Microsoft said it will stop forcing password resets for Windows 10 and Windows Server because forcing resets doesn’t improve security. CNet’s report of this development noted Microsoft’s unique position of influence, given its software powers almost 80 per cent of the world’s computers. We recently blogged about what the new FIDO2 authentication standard could mean for passwords. Better to use two-factor authentication where possible. Google’s Mark Risher has explained that 2FA offers much more effective protection against risks like phishing.

GDPRversary getting closer

Almost one year on from when the General Data Protection Regulation came into force, we’re still getting to grips with its implications. The European Data Protection Supervisor, Giovanni Buttarelli, has weighed in on the state of GDPR adoption. He covered many areas in an interview with Digiday, including consent, fines, and legitimate interest. One comment we liked was how falling into line with the regulation is an ongoing activity, not a one-time target to hit. “Compliance is a continued working progress for everyone,” he said.

The European Data Protection Board (formerly known as the Article 29 Working Group) recently issued draft guidance on an appropriate legal basis and contractual obligations in the context of providing online services to data subjects. This is a public consultation period that runs until May 24.

The EDPB is also reportedly planning to publish accreditation requirements this summer. As yet, there are no approved GDPR certification schemes or accreditation bodies, but that looks set to change. The UK regulator recently published its own information about certification and codes of conduct.

Meanwhile, Ireland’s Data Protection Commission has started a podcast called Know Your Data. The short episodes have content that mixes information for data controllers and processors, and more general information for data subjects (ie, everyone).

Breaching the c-suite

Senior management are in attackers’ crosshairs as never before, and 12 times more likely to be targeted in social engineering incidents than in years past. That is one of the many highlights from the 2019 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report. Almost seven out of ten attacks were by outsiders, while just over a third involved internal parties. Just over half of security breaches featured hacking; social engineering was a tactic in 33 per cent of cases. Errors were the cause of 21 per cent of breaches, while 15 per cent were attributed to misuse by authorised users.

Financial intent was behind 12 per cent of all the listed data breaches, and corporate espionage was another motive. As a result, there is a “critical” need for organisations to make all employees aware of the potential threat of cybercrime, Computer Weekly said. ThreatPost reported that executives are six times more likely to be a target of social engineering than a year ago.

Some sites like ZDNet led with another finding: that nation-state attackers are responsible for a rising proportion of breaches (23 per cent, up from 12 per cent a year ago). It also highlighted the role of system admin issues that subsequently led to breaches in cloud storage platforms. Careless mistakes like misconfiguration and publishing errors also left data at risk of access by cybercriminals.

The Verizon DBIR is one of the most authoritative sources of security information. Its content is punchy, backed by a mine of informative stats to help technology professionals and business leaders plan their security strategies. The analysis derives from 41,000 reported cybersecurity incidents and 2,000 data breaches, featuring contributions from 73 public and private organisations across the globe, including Ireland’s Irisscert. The full report and executive summary are free to download here.

Links we liked

Challenge your preconceptions: a new paper argues cybersecurity isn’t important. MORE

An unfortunate trend that needs to change: security pros think users are stupid. MORE

It’s time to panic about privacy, argues the New York Times in this interactive piece. MORE

Want a career in cybersecurity, or know someone who does? Free training material here. MORE

NIST has developed a comprehensive new tool for finding flaws in high-risk software. MORE

NIST also issued guidelines for vetting the security of mobile applications. MORE

Cybersecurity threats: perception versus reality as reported by AT&T Security. MORE

Here’s a technical deep dive into how phishing kits are evolving, courtesy of ZScaler. MORE

A P2P flaw exposes millions of IoT security cameras and other devices to risks. MORE

A new way to improve network security by analysing compressed traffic. MORE

 

The post Security roundup: May 2019 appeared first on BH Consulting.

That’s classified! Our top secret guide to helping people protect information

As information security professionals, we often face a challenge when trying to explain what we mean by ‘data classification’. So here’s my suggestion: let’s start by not calling it that. In my experience, the minute you call it that, people switch off.

Our role should be to try to engage an audience, not scare them away. Classification sounds like a military term, and if the reaction that greets you is an eye-roll that says: ‘you’re talking security again’, then they’ve zoned out before you’ve even got to the second sentence. I try and change the language, because otherwise, what we have here is a failure to communicate.

In reality, it’s very simple if you explain what you mean by classification. If we strip away any jargon or names, what we’re doing is asking an organisation to decide what information is most important to it. Then, it’s about asking the organisation’s people to apply appropriate layers of protection to that information based on its level of importance.

De do do do, de da da da

Who needs to use data classification? These days, it’s everyone. Why is it important? Why make people do this work? Data is a precious commodity. Think of it like water in many parts of the world: there’s a lot of it about, it’s too easily leaked if you don’t protect it, it’s extremely valuable if you control the source, and you can combine it with other things to increase its worth. Well, it’s a similar story with data. Data is just a bunch of numbers, but context turns it into information. You could have 14 seemingly random numbers, and that’s data. Now, split them into two groups, one of eight digits and another of six digits with some dashes in between. Suddenly those numbers become a bank account number and sort code. Then it’s information.

Message in a bottle

The first step for security professionals to win people over to the concept is to make it real for their audience. If your message is personal, people can relate it to what they have to do in their work.

We handle types of information in different ways and make decisions all the time on who should have access to it. Think of it this way: do you file paperwork – utility bills, appointment letters, bank statements – at home? Would you leave your payslip lying around the home for your kids to read?

In a work context, a CEO might want their executive assistant to access their calendar for meetings, but they don’t necessarily want to share their bank account details to see how much money they make or what they spend it on.

Naturally, the type of information that’s most valuable will vary by industry, so you have to adapt any message to suit. In healthcare, it might be sensitive medical records about someone’s health. For someone working in food and drinks industry, maybe IP (intellectual property) like the recipe to the secret sauce or the package design are the most valuable items to protect. In pharmaceuticals, it might be the blueprints or ingredients in a new drug.

You don’t have to put on the red light

So now we’ve established that information may have different values, how do we group them? Deciding on the value of information may require the employee to apply good judgement. I like using the traffic light idea of three tiers of information (red amber and green) rather than the binary option of just public or private. Those three levels then become public (green), confidential (amber), and restricted or private (red). It allows for an extra level of data management, and therefore protection, where needed but is still a simple number to grasp.

Photo by Harshal Desai on Unsplash

This approach is easy to picture. People can very quickly understand what category information falls into, and what to do with it. Using the traffic light approach, public material (green) might be a brochure about a new product, or it could be the menu in the staff canteen. That’s the material that you want many people to see. The company contact directory or minutes from a meeting would be confidential (amber). Items that aren’t for general distribution outside board level (such as merger discussions) are extremely sensitive or privileged (red).

Once we know what we’re protecting, we get to the how.

  • If we’re dealing with physical paper documents, we can mark the sensitive information with a red sticker or red mark on the corner. The rule might be: never leave a red file unattended unless an authorised person is actively reading it and doing something with it. You know it shouldn’t leave the building unless it’s extremely well protected.
  • If the mark or sticker is amber, the person holding it must lock it away overnight.
  • Any document with a green mark doesn’t have to be locked away.

Every breath you take

You can extend that system beyond individual files to folders and to filing cabinets if necessary. You can apply this very easily by adding the appropriate colour to each document, folder, filing cabinet or even rooms in the building. Leave marker pens, stickers or anything that clearly shows the classification available for people to use.

It’s relatively easy to get people to apply the exact same marking system to electronic data. So you mark the Word file or Excel sheet with the same colour scheme, and folders, and so on. Once you’ve put the colours on it, the application of it is easy. If you use templates or forms of any kind it’s easy to start applying rules automatically, and you can then tie in the classification to your data leakage prevention tools, or DLP solutions, by blocking the most sensitive information from leaving the organisation, or at least flagging it for attention. It’s possible to put markers in the metadata of document templates, so amber or red documents could flag to the user that they need to encrypt before sending.

Ultimately, we’re in the business of changing behaviour, and the net result should be that people become more aware of information and data protection because it’s a relatable concept that they’re applying in their daily work, almost without realising.

So if not classification, what do we call it? The importance of information? Data management? It’s still not very snappy, so any suggestions or answers on a postcard please.

Oh, and as a footnote, if you have any information you want everyone in the company to read, just put it in an unsealed envelope marked “CONFIDENTIAL” and leave it near the printer/photocopier/coffee area. I guarantee everyone passing will take a look.

The post That’s classified! Our top secret guide to helping people protect information appeared first on BH Consulting.

Top Tips On Cyber Security for SMEs

Guest article by Damon Culbert of Cyber Security Jobs

Cyber criminals are a part of modern life, from Uber account hacks to major business data breaches, our online identities are rarely safe. And, while big-name companies under threat often make the news, it’s small and medium-sized enterprises who are actually their biggest targets.

Large businesses and government departments may seem like more obvious hacking targets with bigger payoffs, but these organisations can afford much more robust, well-kept and successful IT security measures and cyber security professionals working round the clock. Due to this, cyber criminals are much more likely to swing for easy targets like family businesses.

With the introduction of GDPR across Europe, all businesses are now much more responsible for the personal data they keep, meaning companies of all size can’t really afford to not have at least the basic security measures in place. The UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) have created a list of five principles as part of their Cyber Essentials Scheme. These include:

1. Secure your internet connection
2. Protect from viruses and other malware
3. Control access to your data and services
4. Secure your devices and software
5. Keep your devices and software up to date

All small businesses should know these principles and be putting them into practice, no matter how many staff they employ. In addition to this, here are a couple of other tips to keep hackers at bay which can be simply implemented into your business practices and keep the ICO (Information Commissioner’s Office) from the door.

Invest in Software and Hardware
While just functioning from day to day might be your only priority as a small business owner, investing in your technology will undoubtedly help in the long run. Keeping your software, such as virus software and operation systems, will ensure that any vulnerabilities identified by the creators are covered and there are no gaping holes in your cyber defences.

It might also be a good idea to invest in a good-quality back-up server and cyber insurance, so that if any personal data is every compromised, your operations can simply switch to the back-up server without affecting your business. Cyber insurance will also help keep you covered in case any clients’ personal data is lost and costs are incurred.

Staff Awareness Without the awareness of your staff, no manner of cyber security measures will keep your business safe. 90% of breaches happen because of user interaction, most commonly through phishing scams. Sophisticated phishers can impersonate senior members of staff in your organisation and trick other employees into handing over login details, authorising bogus payments or redirecting bank transfers.

Ensuring that staff are made aware of how to identify phishing scams and even having experienced trainers come in to guide them through cyber security best practice may seem like a cost you can spare but will go far in keeping the walls around your business impenetrable.

Compliance
The GDPR states that businesses who suffer a breach must alert the ICO and any customers who may have been affected within 72 hours of discovery. This is vital, and although fines could still be handed out for failure to prevent a breach, these fines will be much higher if the ICO discovers that you kept the information to yourself for longer than the 72 hour period.

The average time it takes for an organisation to discover a breach is 229 days, so the actual time it takes for the breach to come to your attention isn’t going to work too poorly in your favour. However, regular reporting is likely to result in earlier identification which will not only help you save time and money, but will also be a great trust signal to your clients that you take protecting their data seriously.

Pre-emptive planning
Security breaches are a ‘when’ not ‘if’ problem, so planning ahead is a necessity of modern business. 74% of SMEs don’t have any money saved to deal with an attack and 40% wouldn’t even know who to contact in the event of a breach. Having comprehensive disaster management plans in place will help keep you and your clients safe, keep your reputation in top shape and make sure you don’t have to pay out major money in the worst case scenario.

Plan of Action
The best thing for SMEs to do is to start small and keep building their defences as time goes on, helping keep costs down and customers happy. Here’s a plan of action to get started:

1. Start with the basics: follow the Cyber Essentials Scheme and bake these principles into your daily operations
2. Get an understanding of the risks to your business: check out the NCSC’s ’10 Steps to Cyber Security’ for further detail than the Cyber Essentials
3. Know your business: if you still feel your data isn’t safe, research more comprehensive frameworks like the IASME standard developed for small businesses
4. Once you have a complete security framework in place, develop on the NCSC’s advice with more sophisticated frameworks, such as the NIST framework for cybersecurity.

Cyber Security: Three Parts Art, One Part Science

As I reflect upon my almost 40 years as a cyber security professional, I think of the many instances where the basic tenets of cyber security—those we think have common understanding—require a lot of additional explanation. For example, what is a vulnerability assessment? If five cyber professionals are sitting around a table discussing this question, you will end up with seven or eight answers. One will say that a vulnerability assessment is vulnerability scanning only. Another will say an assessment is much bigger than scanning, and addresses ethical hacking and internal security testing. Another will say that it is a passive review of policies and controls. All are correct in some form, but the answer really depends on the requirements or criteria you are trying to achieve. And it also depends on the skills and experience of the risk owner, auditor, or assessor. Is your head spinning yet? I know mine is! Hence the “three parts art.”

There is quite a bit of subjectivity in the cyber security business. One auditor will look at evidence and agree you are in compliance; another will say you are not. If you are going to protect sensitive information, do you encrypt it, obfuscate it, or segment it off and place it behind very tight identification and access controls before allowing users to access the data? Yes. As we advise our client base, it is essential that we have all the context necessary to make good risk-based decisions and recommendations.

Let’s talk about Connection’s artistic methodology. We start with a canvas that has the core components of cyber security: protection, detection, and reaction. By addressing each of these three pillars in a comprehensive way, we ensure that the full conversation around how people, process, and technology all work together to provide a comprehensive risk strategy is achieved.

Protection:

People
Users understand threat and risk, and know what role they play in the protection strategy. For example, if you see something, say something. Don’t let someone surf in behind you through a badge check entry. And don’t think about trying to shut off your end-point anti-virus or firewall.

Process
Policy are established, documented, and socialized. For example, personal laptops should never be connected to the corporate network. Also, don’t send sensitive information to your personal email account so you can work from home.

Technology
Some examples of the barriers used to deter attackers and breaches are edge security with firewalls, intrusion detection and prevention, sandboxing, and advanced threat detection.

Detection:

The average mean time to identify an active incident in a network is 197 days. The mean time to contain an incident is 69 days.

People
Incident response teams need to be identified and trained, and all employees need to be trained on the concept of “if you see something, say something.” Detection is a proactive process.

Process
What happens when an alert occurs? Who sees it? What is the documented process for taking action?

Technology
What is in place to ensure you are detecting malicious activity? Is it configured to ignore noise and only alert you of a real event? Will it help you bring that 197-day mean time to detection way down?

Reaction:

People
What happens when an event occurs? Who responds? How do you recover? Does everyone understand their role? Do you War Game to ensure you are prepared WHEN an incident occurs?

Process
What is the documented process to reduce the Kill Chain—the mean time to detect and contain—from 69 days to 69 minutes? Do you have a Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Plan to ensure the ability to react to a natural disaster, significant cyber breach such as ransomware, DDoS, or—dare I say it—a pandemic?

Technology
What cyber security consoles have been deployed that allow quick access to patch a system, change a firewall rule, switch ACL, or policy setting at an end point, or track a security incident through the triage process?

All of these things are important to create a comprehensive InfoSec Program. The science is the technology that will help you build a layered, in-depth defense approach. The art is how to assess the threat, define and document the risk, and create a strategy that allows you to manage your cyber risk as it applies to your environment, users, systems, applications, data, customers, supply chain, third party support partners, and business process.

More Art: Are You a Risk Avoider or Risk Transference Expert?

A better way to state that is, “Do you avoid all risk responsibility or do you give your risk responsibility to someone else?” Hint: I don’t believe in risk avoidance or risk transference.

Yes, there is an art to risk management. There is also science if you use, for example, The Carnegie Mellon risk tools. But a good risk owner and manager documents risk, prioritizes it by risk criticality, turns it into a risk register or roadmap plan, remediates what is necessary, and accepts what is reasonable from a business and cyber security perspective. Oh, by the way, those same five cyber security professional we talked about earlier? They have 17 definitions of risk.

As we wrap up this conversation, let’s talk about the importance of selecting a risk framework. It’s kind of like going to a baseball game and recognizing the program helps you know the players and the stats. What framework will you pick? Do you paint in watercolors or oils? Are you a National Institute of Standards (NIST) artist, an Internal Standards Organization artist, or have you developed your own framework like the Nardone puzzle chart? I developed this several years ago when I was the CTO/CSO of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It has been artistically enhanced over the years to incorporate more security components, but it is loosely coupled on the NIST 800-53 and ISO 27001 standards.

When it comes to selecting a security framework as a CISO, I lean towards the NIST Cyber Security Framework (CSF) pictured below. This framework is comprehensive, and provides a scoring model that allows risk owners to measure and target what risk level they believe they need to achieve based on their business model, threat profile, and risk tolerance. It has five functional focus areas. The ISO 27001 framework is also a very solid and frequently used model. Both of these frameworks can result in a Certificate of Attestation demonstrating adherence to the standard. Many commercial corporations do an annual ISO 27001 assessment for that very reason. More and more are leaning towards the NIST CSF, especially commercial corporations doing work with the government.

The art in cyber security is in the interpretation of the rules, standards, and requirements that are primarily based on a foundation in science in some form. The more experience one has in the cyber security industry, the more effective the art becomes. As a last thought, keep in mind that Connection’s Technology Solutions Group Security Practice has over 150 years of cyber security expertise on tap to apply to that art.

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October Is National Cyber Security Awareness Month: Be Part of Something Big

2018 marks the 15th year of National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM). The Internet touches every aspect of our lives, and keeping it safe and secure is everyone’s responsibility. You can make a difference by remaining diligent and staying cyber aware. Be part of something big this month. Learn more, be aware, and get involved.

Connection is an official Champion of NCSAM. We’re dedicating the month of October to spreading the word about the importance of cyber security, and providing tools and resources to help you stay safe and secure online.

Each week during October highlights a different cyber security theme, addressing specific challenges and opportunities for change. Stay tuned for information about the top cyber security threats, careers in cyber security, and why it’s everyone’s job to ensure online safety. What are you doing to keep the Internet safer and more secure? Be sure to check back each week to stay informed, and get tips from our experts about how you can participate in keeping everyone safe online.

The post October Is National Cyber Security Awareness Month: Be Part of Something Big appeared first on Connected.