Category Archives: Security Awareness

How can we harness human bias to have a more positive impact on cybersecurity awareness?

Dr. Jessica Barker, Co-CEO of Cygenta, follows her passion of positively influencing cybersecurity awareness, behaviours and culture in organisations around the world. Dr. Barker will be speaking about the psychology of fear and cybersecurity at RSA Conference 2020, and in this interview she discusses the human nature of cybersecurity. What are some of the most important things you’ve learned over time when it comes to security culture? How important is it and why? A positive … More

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Layering diverse defenses is crucial for stopping email attacks

Despite heading a company that provides a technological solution for stopping targeted email attacks, Evan Reiser, CEO of Abnormal Security, knows that technology is not the complete answer to the malicious email problem. At the same time, security awareness and anti-phishing training is also not a foolproof solution, he maintains. “Some businesses are giving up on technology and defaulting to an awareness-based security program for detecting email attacks, but that sets them up for failure. … More

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The Top 19 Information Security Conferences of 2020

With the 2010s now over, the infosec industry is now fully invested in 2020 and beyond. The 2020s will no doubt present their fair share of challenging digital security threats. But they will also enable security professionals to discuss shared difficulties at conferences and summits. To help promote these collaborative events, we at The State […]… Read More

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Secure IT: Shop Safe Online

Everything we do on a daily basis has some form of “trust” baked into it. Where you live, what kind of car you drive, where you send your children to school, who you consider good friends, what businesses you purchase from, etc. Trust instills a level of confidence that your risk is minimized and acceptable to you. Why should this philosophy be any different when the entity you need to trust is on the other end of an Internet address? In fact, because you are connecting to an entity that you cannot see or validate, a higher level of scrutiny is required before they earn your trust. What Universal Resource Locator (URL) are you really connecting to? Is it really your banking website or new online shopping website that you are trying for the first time? How can you tell?

It’s a jungle out there. So we’ve put together five ways you can stay safe while you shop online:

  1. Shop at sites you trust. Are you looking at a nationally or globally recognized brand? Do you have detailed insight into what the site looks like? Have you established an account on this site, and is there a history that you can track for when you visit and what you buy? Have you linked the valid URL for the site in your browser? Mistyping a URL in your browser for any site you routinely visit can lead you to a rogue website.

  2. Use secure networks to connect. Just as important as paying attention to what you connect to is to be wary of where you connect from. Your home Wi-Fi network that you trust—okay. An open Wi-Fi at an airport, cyber café, or public kiosk—not okay. If you can’t trust the network, do not enter identifying information or your payment card information. Just ask our cybersecurity services experts to demonstrate how easy it is to compromise an open Wi-Fi network, and you’ll see why we recommend against public Wi-Fi for sensitive transactions.

  3. Perform basic checks in your browser. Today’s modern browsers are much better at encrypted and secure connections than they were a few years ago. They use encrypted communication by leveraging a specific Internet protocol, hypertext transfer protocol secure (HTTPS). This means that there is a certificate associated with this site in your browser that is verified before you are allowed to connect and establish the encrypted channel. (Just so you know, yes, these certificates can be spoofed, but that is a problem for another day). How do you check for this certificate?

    Look up in your browser title bar.

  4. It will display the URL you are connecting to.

    Hover over and click on the lock icon

    Note that the information says the certificate is valid. But let’s verify that. Hover over and click on the certificate icon.

    Certificate is issued to Amazon from a valid Certificate Authority and is valid until 12/15/2019. Excellent.

  5. Create strong password for your shopping sites. This issue is covered in another blog post, but use longer passwords, 10–12 characters, and keep them in a safe place that cannot be compromised by an unauthorized person. If a second factor is offered, use it. Many sites will send you a code to your smartphone to type into a login screen to verify you are who you say you are.

  6. Don’t give out information about yourself that seems unreasonable. If you are being asked for your social security number, think long and hard, and then longer and harder, about why that information should be required. And then don’t do it until you ask a trusted source about why that would be necessary. Be wary of anything you see when you are on a website that does not look familiar or normal.

We all use the Internet to shop. It is super convenient, and the return on investment is awesome. Having that new cool thing purchased in 10 minutes and delivered directly to your door—wow! Can you ever really be 100% sure that the Internet site you are visiting is legitimate, and that you are not going to inadvertently give away sensitive and/or financial information that is actually going directly into a hacker’s data collection file? Unfortunately, no. A lot of today’s scammers are very sophisticated. But as we discussed up front, this is a trust- and risk-based decision, and if you are aware that you could be compromised at any time on the Internet and are keeping your eyes open for things that just don’t look right or familiar, you have a higher probability of a safe online shopping experience.

To recap:

  • Visit and use sites you know and trust
  • Keep the correct URLs in your bookmarks (don’t risk mistyping a URL).
  • Check the certificate to ensure your connection to the site is secured by a legitimate and active certificate.
  • Look for anything that is not familiar to your known experience with the site.
  • If you can, do not save credit card or payment card information on the site. (If you do, you need to be aware that if that site is breached, your payment data is compromised.)
  • Use strong passwords for your shopping site accounts. And use a different password for every site. (No one ring to rule them all!)
  • If a site offers a second factor to authenticate you, use it.
  • Check all your payment card statements regularly to look for rogue purchases.
  • Subscribe to an identity theft protection service if you can. These services will alert you if your identity has been compromised.

Safe shopping!

The post Secure IT: Shop Safe Online appeared first on Connected.

Best Practices for Keeping Tabs on Your Apps

Let’s start this conversation out with the definition of device. The list of what constitutes one is growing. For now, let’s say that you have a home computer (desktop, laptop, or both), work computer (desktop, laptop, or both), home tablet, work tablet, personal smartphone, and work smartphone. This is a pretty extensive list of devices that an adversary could use to attack you professionally and personally. But what about your Amazon Alexa or gadgets, smart toys, and smart clocks? What about Google Assistant or Microsoft Cortana? Do you also have a SmartTV? What about NEST, Wink, WeMo, SensorPush, Neurio, ecobee4, Philips Hue, Smart Lock, GarageMate? Hoo boy! The list of connected devices goes on and on.

Are all of these devices safe to use? Well, the simple answer is no—unless you specifically paid attention to its security. Also, for your smart devices that work via voice control, do you know who might be listening on the other end? To make things worse, many of these devices are also used in the corporate world, because they are easy to deploy, and are very affordable.

What about applications? Did the developer that created the application you are using ensure they used good secure coding techniques? Or is there a likelihood they introduced a flaw in their code? Are the servers for the application you are running in the cloud secure? Is the data you are storing on these cloud systems protected from unauthorized access?

All really good questions we rarely ask ourselves—at least before we use the latest and coolest applications available. We all make risk-based decisions every day, but do we ever ensure we have all the data before we make that risk-based decision?

What Can You Do?

Start by doing whatever homework and research you can. Make sure you understand the social engineering methods that the malicious actors are currently using. Unsolicited phone calls from a government agency (like the IRS), a public utility, or even Microsoft or Apple are not legitimate. No you don’t owe back taxes, no your computer has not been hacked, no you don’t need to give out sensitive personal information to your power company over the phone.

How Can You Choose Safe Applications?

Simply Google “Is this <name of application> secure?” Never install an application that you don’t feel you can trust. Using an application is all about risk management. Make sure you understand the potential risk to device and data compromise, prior to choosing to use it.

How Can You Better Secure Your Home Network?

  1. Upon installation of any device, immediately change the login and password. These are often stored in the configuration files that come with the product, therefore are easy to look up.
  2. Change the login and password on your home Wi-Fi router frequently.
  3. Ensure the software for anything that connects is up to date.
  4. Make sure you have a clear sense of where your sensitive data is stored—and how it is protected. Is it adequately protected—or, better yet, encrypted?
  5. When in doubt, don’t connect an IoT device to the Internet.

Lastly, look at some solutions that can be added to your home Wi-Fi network, that provide additional layers of protection and detection against IoT and other advanced attacks. F-Secure Sense Gadget is one such solution, as is Luma smart Wi-Fi router, Dojo, and CUJO. Dojo, for example, monitors all incoming and outgoing traffic and performs analysis looking for malicious traffic. With known weaknesses in IoT and home networks in general, solutions like the above are a good investment.

Don’t Give Hackers Easy Access

Not long ago, a casino in the Northeast had a fish tank in their lobby. To make management of the fish tank easier, they installed an IoT-enabled thermostatic control to set and monitor water temperature in the tank. The thermostatic control was connected to their internal network, as well as IoT-enabled to allow easy access from anywhere on the Internet. The device was breached from the Internet by malicious actors, and the internal network was penetrated, allowing the hackers to steal information from a high-roller database before devices monitoring the network were able to identify the unauthorized data leaving the network and shut it down. A classic case of what can happen without the right due diligence.

Try and follow this motto. Just because you can, does not mean you should. The latest shiny IT gadget that will make you seem cool, or potentially make some portion of your life easier to manage, should be evaluated thoroughly for security weaknesses, before you turn it on and open it up to the world. Make that good risk-based decision. Not many of us would consider doing this: “Hey Alexa, open up my desktop computer so that all my sensitive data is opened for all the world to see.” Or would we?

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Cyber Security: Three Parts Art, One Part Science

As I reflect upon my almost 40 years as a cyber security professional, I think of the many instances where the basic tenets of cyber security—those we think have common understanding—require a lot of additional explanation. For example, what is a vulnerability assessment? If five cyber professionals are sitting around a table discussing this question, you will end up with seven or eight answers. One will say that a vulnerability assessment is vulnerability scanning only. Another will say an assessment is much bigger than scanning, and addresses ethical hacking and internal security testing. Another will say that it is a passive review of policies and controls. All are correct in some form, but the answer really depends on the requirements or criteria you are trying to achieve. And it also depends on the skills and experience of the risk owner, auditor, or assessor. Is your head spinning yet? I know mine is! Hence the “three parts art.”

There is quite a bit of subjectivity in the cyber security business. One auditor will look at evidence and agree you are in compliance; another will say you are not. If you are going to protect sensitive information, do you encrypt it, obfuscate it, or segment it off and place it behind very tight identification and access controls before allowing users to access the data? Yes. As we advise our client base, it is essential that we have all the context necessary to make good risk-based decisions and recommendations.

Let’s talk about Connection’s artistic methodology. We start with a canvas that has the core components of cyber security: protection, detection, and reaction. By addressing each of these three pillars in a comprehensive way, we ensure that the full conversation around how people, process, and technology all work together to provide a comprehensive risk strategy is achieved.

Protection:

People
Users understand threat and risk, and know what role they play in the protection strategy. For example, if you see something, say something. Don’t let someone surf in behind you through a badge check entry. And don’t think about trying to shut off your end-point anti-virus or firewall.

Process
Policy are established, documented, and socialized. For example, personal laptops should never be connected to the corporate network. Also, don’t send sensitive information to your personal email account so you can work from home.

Technology
Some examples of the barriers used to deter attackers and breaches are edge security with firewalls, intrusion detection and prevention, sandboxing, and advanced threat detection.

Detection:

The average mean time to identify an active incident in a network is 197 days. The mean time to contain an incident is 69 days.

People
Incident response teams need to be identified and trained, and all employees need to be trained on the concept of “if you see something, say something.” Detection is a proactive process.

Process
What happens when an alert occurs? Who sees it? What is the documented process for taking action?

Technology
What is in place to ensure you are detecting malicious activity? Is it configured to ignore noise and only alert you of a real event? Will it help you bring that 197-day mean time to detection way down?

Reaction:

People
What happens when an event occurs? Who responds? How do you recover? Does everyone understand their role? Do you War Game to ensure you are prepared WHEN an incident occurs?

Process
What is the documented process to reduce the Kill Chain—the mean time to detect and contain—from 69 days to 69 minutes? Do you have a Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Plan to ensure the ability to react to a natural disaster, significant cyber breach such as ransomware, DDoS, or—dare I say it—a pandemic?

Technology
What cyber security consoles have been deployed that allow quick access to patch a system, change a firewall rule, switch ACL, or policy setting at an end point, or track a security incident through the triage process?

All of these things are important to create a comprehensive InfoSec Program. The science is the technology that will help you build a layered, in-depth defense approach. The art is how to assess the threat, define and document the risk, and create a strategy that allows you to manage your cyber risk as it applies to your environment, users, systems, applications, data, customers, supply chain, third party support partners, and business process.

More Art: Are You a Risk Avoider or Risk Transference Expert?

A better way to state that is, “Do you avoid all risk responsibility or do you give your risk responsibility to someone else?” Hint: I don’t believe in risk avoidance or risk transference.

Yes, there is an art to risk management. There is also science if you use, for example, The Carnegie Mellon risk tools. But a good risk owner and manager documents risk, prioritizes it by risk criticality, turns it into a risk register or roadmap plan, remediates what is necessary, and accepts what is reasonable from a business and cyber security perspective. Oh, by the way, those same five cyber security professional we talked about earlier? They have 17 definitions of risk.

As we wrap up this conversation, let’s talk about the importance of selecting a risk framework. It’s kind of like going to a baseball game and recognizing the program helps you know the players and the stats. What framework will you pick? Do you paint in watercolors or oils? Are you a National Institute of Standards (NIST) artist, an Internal Standards Organization artist, or have you developed your own framework like the Nardone puzzle chart? I developed this several years ago when I was the CTO/CSO of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It has been artistically enhanced over the years to incorporate more security components, but it is loosely coupled on the NIST 800-53 and ISO 27001 standards.

When it comes to selecting a security framework as a CISO, I lean towards the NIST Cyber Security Framework (CSF) pictured below. This framework is comprehensive, and provides a scoring model that allows risk owners to measure and target what risk level they believe they need to achieve based on their business model, threat profile, and risk tolerance. It has five functional focus areas. The ISO 27001 framework is also a very solid and frequently used model. Both of these frameworks can result in a Certificate of Attestation demonstrating adherence to the standard. Many commercial corporations do an annual ISO 27001 assessment for that very reason. More and more are leaning towards the NIST CSF, especially commercial corporations doing work with the government.

The art in cyber security is in the interpretation of the rules, standards, and requirements that are primarily based on a foundation in science in some form. The more experience one has in the cyber security industry, the more effective the art becomes. As a last thought, keep in mind that Connection’s Technology Solutions Group Security Practice has over 150 years of cyber security expertise on tap to apply to that art.

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October Is National Cyber Security Awareness Month: Be Part of Something Big

2018 marks the 15th year of National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM). The Internet touches every aspect of our lives, and keeping it safe and secure is everyone’s responsibility. You can make a difference by remaining diligent and staying cyber aware. Be part of something big this month. Learn more, be aware, and get involved.

Connection is an official Champion of NCSAM. We’re dedicating the month of October to spreading the word about the importance of cyber security, and providing tools and resources to help you stay safe and secure online.

Each week during October highlights a different cyber security theme, addressing specific challenges and opportunities for change. Stay tuned for information about the top cyber security threats, careers in cyber security, and why it’s everyone’s job to ensure online safety. What are you doing to keep the Internet safer and more secure? Be sure to check back each week to stay informed, and get tips from our experts about how you can participate in keeping everyone safe online.

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