Category Archives: Science

Collaborating with Threat Sharing Groups

blog.analecta-llc.com - Ongoing contact with security groups and associations, especially affiliated with your organization’s industry, can be a vital source of threat information. The threat landscape changes so rapidly th…


Tweeted by @AnalectaCyber https://twitter.com/AnalectaCyber/status/1043300665261342720

Increased Use of a Delphi Packer to Evade Malware Classification « Increased Use of a Delphi Packer to Evade Malware Classification

fireeye.com - The concept of "packing" or "crypting" a malicious program is widely popular among threat actors looking to bypass or defeat analysis by static and dynamic analysis tools. Evasion of classification a…


Tweeted by @Cyber_O51NT https://twitter.com/Cyber_O51NT/status/1042909365156687873

How Augmented Intelligence provides a key in understanding complex city systems, by Michel Morvan, CEO Cosmo Tech USA

smartcitiesworld.net - Recently, the city of Toronto selected Alphabet’s Sidewalk Labs to bring its computing power and big data experience to bear in an effort to build a better urban center. It’s no surprise that the sam…


Tweeted by @Cyber_Physical https://twitter.com/Cyber_Physical/status/1042816408328040448

NDC – News

ndc.nato.int - Dear Reader, Recent events surrounding the presidential election in the United States have thrown Russia's capabilities and intentions in the information domain into renewed focus. The implications o…


Tweeted by @jim_cabral https://twitter.com/jim_cabral/status/1042772294572101632

Humans Simply ‘Hardwired’ For Laziness, Study Says

Zorro shares a report from Study Finds: [...] A new study shows we may just have to chalk it up to our brains simply being hardwired to prefer hanging on the couch instead of the chin-up bar. Researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Geneva sought to better understand the brain chemistry behind what they refer to as the "exercise paradox." This happens when people pledge to engage in regular physical fitness, but instead find themselves becoming less active. "Conserving energy has been essential for humans' survival, as it allowed us to be more efficient in searching for food and shelter, competing for sexual partners, and avoiding predators," explains Matthew Boisgontier, a postdoctoral researcher in UBC's brain behavior lab at the department of physical therapy, and senior author of the study, in a UBC release. So Boisgontier and his co-authors recruited 29 young adults who wanted to improve the level of exercise in their lives to take part in a computerized test. The test required them to move a human figure on the screen either towards images of physical activities or away from images of sedentary activities that would randomly appear, and then again vice versa. Participants were hooked up to an electroencephalograph to monitor their brain activity during the exercise. The results showed that participants tended to move towards the active images or away from the sedentary ones at the fastest rates. "We found that participants took 32 milliseconds less to move away from the sedentary image, which is considerable for a task like this," says study co-author Boris Cheval, of the University of Geneva, in a university release, adding that this finding went against the so-called exercise paradox.

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Working at Macquarie

mq.edu.au - Excellent continuing opportunity for an early career academic to build a career in the dynamic field of intelligence studies __________________________________________________________________________…


Tweeted by @CyberTaters https://twitter.com/CyberTaters/status/1042584974686347264

Cyber Dragon: Inside China’s Information Warfare and Cyber Operations (Praeger Security International) – CyberWar

tobem.com - This book provides a framework for assessing China's extensive cyber espionage efforts and multi-decade modernization of its military, not only identifying the "what" but also addressing the "why" be…


Tweeted by @CyberToolsBooks https://twitter.com/CyberToolsBooks/status/1042517003943194626

Reimagining of Schrodinger’s Cat Breaks Quantum Mechanics — and Stumps Physicists

In a multi-'cat' experiment, the textbook interpretation of quantum theory seems to lead to contradictory pictures of reality, physicists claim. New submitter Lanodonal shares a report: In the world's most famous thought experiment, physicist Erwin Schrodinger described how a cat in a box could be in an uncertain predicament. The peculiar rules of quantum theory meant that it could be both dead and alive, until the box was opened and the cat's state measured. Now, two physicists have devised a modern version of the paradox by replacing the cat with a physicist doing experiments -- with shocking implications. Quantum theory has a long history of thought experiments, and in most cases these are used to point to weaknesses in various interpretations of quantum mechanics. But the latest version, which involves multiple players, is unusual: it shows that if the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics is correct, then different experimenters can reach opposite conclusions about what the physicist in the box has measured. This means that quantum theory contradicts itself. The conceptual experiment has been debated with gusto in physics circles for more than two years -- and has left most researchers stumped, even in a field accustomed to weird concepts. "I think this is a whole new level of weirdness," says Matthew Leifer, a theoretical physicist at Chapman University in Orange, California. The authors, Daniela Frauchiger and Renato Renner of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, posted their first version of the argument online in April 2016. The final paper [PDF] appears in Nature Communications on 18 September.

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2018 Application Protection Report

f5.com - Protecting applications is a critical task for security professionals, yet many feel they’re fighting a losing battle. In F5 Labs’ first annual, comprehensive Application Protection Report, we provid…


Tweeted by @F5Networks https://twitter.com/F5Networks/status/1042478709314400257

Kalender – Piratenpartij

piratenpartij.nl - Op deze agenda staan evenementen waar je kennis kunt maken met Piraten. Ben je Piraat, en ga je ergens naartoe waar je duidelijk als Piraat herkenbaar aanwezig bent, of organiseer je zelf iets? stuur…


Tweeted by @PiratenpartijNL https://twitter.com/PiratenpartijNL/status/1042418312431456257

Elise McGill on LinkedIn: ““Some #defense companies such as #Raytheon, #Lockheed Martin and #Boeing have made investments in #startups that develop…

linkedin.com - “Some #defense companies such as #Raytheon, #Lockheed Martin and #Boeing have made investments in #startups that develop small #satellites as the #Pentagon and #intelligence agencies work to counter …


Tweeted by @VALT_Ent https://twitter.com/VALT_Ent/status/1042386948789170176

Top 10 roles in AI and data science

kdnuggets.com - If you’re keen to make your data useful with a decision intelligence engineering approach, here’s my take on the order in which to grow your team. We start counting at zero, of course, since you need…


Tweeted by @InsightBrief https://twitter.com/InsightBrief/status/1042257738250768385

People Tend To Cluster Into Four Distinct Personality ‘Types,’ Says Study

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A new study has sifted through some of the largest online data sets of personality quizzes and identified four distinct "types" therein. The new methodology used for this study -- described in detail in a new paper in Nature Human Behavior -- is rigorous and replicable, which could help move personality typing analysis out of the dubious self-help section in your local bookstore and into serious scientific journals. What's new here is the identification of four dominant clusters in the overall distribution of traits. [Paper co-author William Revelle (Northwestern University)] prefers to think of them as "lumps in the batter" and suggests that a good analogy would be how people tend to concentrate in cities in the United States. The Northwestern researchers used publicly available data from online quizzes taken by 1.5 million people around the world. That data was then plotted in accordance with the so-called Big Five basic personality traits: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. The Big Five is currently the professional standard for social psychologists who study personality. (Here's a good summary of what each of those traits means to psychologists.) They then applied their algorithms to the resulting dataset. Here are the four distinct personality clusters that the researchers ended up with: Average: These people score high in neuroticism and extraversion, but score low in openness. It is the most typical category, with women being more likely than men to fit into it. Reserved: This type of person is stable emotionally without being especially open or neurotic. They tend to score lower on extraversion but tend to be somewhat agreeable and conscientious. Role Models: These people score high in every trait except neuroticism, and the likelihood that someone fits into this category increases dramatically as they age. "These are people who are dependable and open to new ideas," says Amaral. "These are good people to be in charge of things." Women are more likely than men to be role models. Self-Centered: These people score very high in extraversion, but score low in openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Most teenage boys would fall into this category, according to Revelle, before (hopefully) maturing out of it. The number of people who fall into this category decreases dramatically with age.

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SSIR | research&resources

asghost.co.uk - In these circumstances and involving contexts in international relations (IR) where the developing and observable concept of ‘multiplexity’ is present, to both scholars and practitioners, and equally…


Tweeted by @intstrategist https://twitter.com/intstrategist/status/1042107915249831936

Globalization and Asymmetrical Warfare – Information and Technology, Media Effects, Merging of Defense and Commercial Technologies, Nuclear and Cyber Attack Threats to America, Force Structure – CyberWar

tobem.com - This research paper analyzes the globalization trend and the effect it is having on the ability to conduct asymmetrical attacks against the United States and our Allies worldwide. This research is in…


Tweeted by @CyberTaters https://twitter.com/CyberTaters/status/1041931918521114626

Air Force Reserve

afreserve.com - Overview: The mission statement of the U.S. Air Force is to fly, fight and win...in air, space and cyberspace. The emerging 21st Century battleground is cyberspace; the computer networks and communic…


Tweeted by @AirForceReserve https://twitter.com/AirForceReserve/status/1041824142344052737

Technical Analysis

investopedia.com - Technical analysis is a trading discipline employed to evaluate investments and identify trading opportunities by analyzing statistical trends gathered from trading activity, such as price movement a…


Tweeted by @vestywaves https://twitter.com/vestywaves/status/1041821621294702593

The Marines want to use artificial intelligence to counter one of their enemies’ most effective and hard-to-detect weapons

businessinsider.com - South Korean marines and the US 7th Marine Regiment take part in a mock amphibious landing. After nearly two decades of fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Marine Corps is looking to reorient towar…


Tweeted by @BIAUS https://twitter.com/BIAUS/status/1041794848632651776

Telepathic warfare takes center stage as US military bets big on neuro tech – Fanatical Futurist by International Keynote Speaker Matthew Griffin

fanaticalfuturist.com - WHY THIS MATTERS IN BRIEF Today’s brain machine interfaces are rudimentary or require invasive surgery, this program could bring brain interfaces to the masses and be the next step in human-technolog…


Tweeted by @mgriffin_uk https://twitter.com/mgriffin_uk/status/1041761251930595328

Scientists Followed a Leatherback Turtle Through Hurricane Florence — Here’s What They Saw

An anonymous reader shares a report: At 10:00 p.m. on May 5, a team of people quietly approached a leatherback lying in the sand on the Florida beach. Working quickly while the female sea turtle laid her eggs, they drilled two small holes in the back of her shell. Through the holes they threaded zip ties, affixing a small transmitter with epoxy on the back for added security. Over the next few months, members of the non-profit, Florida Leatherbacks, Inc, watched as Isla the sea turtle visited the beach a few more time to lay new clutches of fragile eggs in the sand, before starting her late summer migration north along the East Coast. "We're monitoring where she is right now, and it just happens to be in the middle of a hurricane," Kelly Martin says. Isla is now off the Outer Banks of North Carolina, to the north of where Hurricane Florence made landfall late last week. For a while it seemed like she would get caught in the massive storm as it slid past the coast. She wound up north of the worst of it, but still experienced rough seas over the weekend. Even before the hurricane hit, she surfaced in an area where waves reached 14 feet high. "Turtles are air breathers, so they need to come to the surface periodically to breathe, but I suspect many dive below the surface to weather the storms," Kate Mansfield, director of the Marine Turtle Research Group at the University of Central Florida, says in an email. "I have tracked turtles through some storms in the past and never saw any sort of movement that suggested they were trying to get away from the storm (or that the storms shifted their paths). The turtles I tracked were larger juveniles -- at that size they can dive 100s of meters deep."

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Becoming a Data Scientist (Transcript)

r-bloggers.com - Here is a link to the podcast. Hugo: Hi there, Renée, and welcome to DataFramed. Renée: Hi Hugo. Great to be here. Hugo: It’s great to have you on the show and I’m really excited to talk about all th…


Tweeted by @Chandanrtcs https://twitter.com/Chandanrtcs/status/1041718591081639936

On the Organization of the U.S. Government for Responding to Cyber-Enabled Information Warfare and Influence Operations, Dr. Herb Lin, Stanford University – Yale Law School

law.yale.edu - This talk will contrast cyber-enabled IW/IO to cybersecurity threats, describe the mechanisms underlying the operation of cyber-enabled IW/IO, address future IW/IO threats, and most importantly consi…


Tweeted by @yaleisp https://twitter.com/yaleisp/status/1041700897225625601

News Article

css.ethz.ch - This article was originally published by the Elcano Royal Institute on 11 September 2018. Thumbnail image courtesy of Markus Spiske/Unsplash. Cyberspace is a new domain for coercive operations in sup…

What is a chatbot, why you need it?

blog.openwebsolutions.in - If you have attempted to get in touch with a company, you would know the depth of frustration which one goes through. Calling does not help as the caller is put through a lengthy process which does n…


Tweeted by @Necio_news https://twitter.com/Necio_news/status/1041374909841256453

Protecting the connected barrels

deloitte.com - For years, cyber attackers have targeted crude oil and natural gas (O&G) companies, with attacks growing in frequency, sophistication, and impact as the industry employs ever more connected technolog…


Tweeted by @Taro_Siddiqui https://twitter.com/Taro_Siddiqui/status/1041323504023601152

Quantum Experiment Confirms Causality Is Fuzzy

"An experiment has confirmed that quantum mechanics allows events to occur with no definite causal order," reports an article shared by long-time Slashdot readers UpnAtom and jd. Researchers at the University of Queensland in Australia believe this could link Einstein's general theory of relativity to quantum mechanics, according to Physics World: In classical physics -- and everyday life -- there is a strict causal relationship between consecutive events. If a second event (B) happens after a first event (A), for example, then B cannot affect the outcome of A. This relationship, however, breaks down in quantum mechanics because the temporal spread of a particles's wave function can be greater than the separation in time between A and B. This means that the causal order of A and B cannot be always be distinguished by a quantum particle such as a photon. In their experiment, Romero, Costa and colleagues created a "quantum switch", in which photons can take two paths. One path involves being subjected to operation A before operation B, while in the other path B occurs before A. The order in which the operations are performed is determined by the initial polarization of the photon as it enters the switch.... The team did the experiment using several different types of operation for A and B and in all cases they found that the measured polarization of the output photons was consistent with their being no definite causal order between when A and B was applied. Indeed, the measurements backed indefinite causal order to a whopping statistical significance of 18 -- well beyond the 5 threshold that is considered a discovery in physics. Science Magazine applauds the experiments for "obliterating our common sense notion of before and after and, potentially, muddying the concept of causality.

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A Transition to Marketing Automation

maria-johnsen.com - When it comes to making a transition to marketing automation, many companies are often uncertain about the extent to which their operations and workforce are equipped to handle potential challenges t…


Tweeted by @RobWillox https://twitter.com/RobWillox/status/1040889399502876672

Study Suggests BPA-Free Plastics Are Just As Harmful To Health

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Gizmodo: Plastic products that boast of being "BPA-free" aren't necessarily any safer for us, suggests a new mouse study published Thursday in Current Biology. The chemicals used to replace BPA in these plastics can still leak out and affect the sperm and eggs of both male and female mice, it found. And these same effects could be happening in people. Bisphenol A, or BPA, is a chemical commonly used to create polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. These clear white plastics are themselves used in food and drink packaging, as well as consumer products and medical devices, while resins are used to coat metal products like canned foods. When these products degrade or are otherwise damaged (from being repeatedly heated in a microwave, for example), they can leach out BPA, exposing us to it. As a result, it's estimated that 93 percent of Americans have some level of BPA in their system. While working on another project, the authors began seeing some but not all of their control mice, both male and female, develop reproductive problems. Though the mice had kept in cages made of polysulfone, not polycarbonate, the researchers noticed a whitish residue in some of the cages, indicating they had been damaged and were leaching chemicals. When Patricia Hunt, a researcher at the Center for Reproductive Biology at Washington State University, and her team analyzed the chemical signature of the damaged cages, they found both BPA and BPS, a bisphenol that is widely replacing BPA. The cases were polysulfone plastic, which is partly made from BPA, but it's advertised to be more heat and chemical resistant than polycarbonate and thus less likely to break down. Polysulfone isn't thought to degrade into BPS, but Hunt's team found that if certain chemical bonds in the plastic were broken in the right way, BPS could form. Following in the vein of their original experiments with BPA, Hunt's team exposed more mice to low doses of BPS, and compared their reproductive health to mice exposed to BPA and mice raised in fresh new cages, presumably free of any BPA/BPS contamination. The BPS mice had more defects in their egg and sperm cells than did the control mice, but the level of damage was similar to that seen in mice they exposed to the same dose of BPA alone. "Though manufacturers have shied away from making explicit claims about BPA replacements being safer, Hunt noted, customers have certainly assumed that they are safer," the report notes.

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Cloud data management firm exposes database with over 440M emails & IP addresses

By Waqas

Data management software companies are mandatorily believed to be having perfectly capable of managing their own data. However, it turns out that some companies, the most popular ones too, struggle to do so. The well-known cloud data management firm Veeam has been in the news lately for grave mismanagement of its customer data, something the […]

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Cloud data management firm exposes database with over 440M emails & IP addresses

A Beginner’s Guide to Threat Hunting

securityintelligence.com - Threat hunting is a popular buzzword in cybersecurity at the moment, but what does it mean? How do you know if you should be doing it, and where do you start? To threat hunt means to proactively sear…


Tweeted by @EricSchnatterly https://twitter.com/EricSchnatterly/status/1040402613898866688