Category Archives: RSA

QuintessenceLabs to extend support for RSA Data Protection Manager software customers

QuintessenceLabs has announced a partnership to allow customers of RSA Data Protection Manager software (DPM) to receive extended support beyond the RSA DPM End-Of-Life date of September 30, 2019. As part of this agreement, QuintessenceLabs will provide the same level of enterprise-class support, Service Level Objectives and product quality as RSA provided. RSA DPM customers can renew their DPM maintenance contract directly with QuintessenceLabs to benefit from long-term DPM support. QuintessenceLabs is also providing a … More

The post QuintessenceLabs to extend support for RSA Data Protection Manager software customers appeared first on Help Net Security.

McAfee CTO @ RSA: Catching Lightning in a Bottle or Burning Bridges to the Future?

I spoke last week at the RSA Conference in San Francisco on the subject of AI related threats and opportunities in the cybersecurity field. I asserted that innovations such as AI can strengthen our defenses but can also enhance the effectiveness of a cyber attacker.  I also looked at some examples of underlying fragility in AI that enable an attacker opportunity to evade AI based defenses. The key to successfully unlocking the potential of AI in cybersecurity requires that we in the cybersecurity industry answer the question of how we can nurture the sparks of AI innovation while recognizing its limitations and how it can be used against us.

We should look to the history of key technological advances to better understand how technology can bring both benefits and challenges. Consider flight in the 20th century. The technology has changed every aspect of our lives, allowing us to move between continents in hours, instead of weeks. Businesses, supply chains, and economies operate globally, and our ability to explore the world and the universe has been forever changed.

But this exact same technology also fundamentally changed warfare. In World War II alone, the strategic bombing campaigns of the Allied and Axis powers killed more than two million people, many of them civilians.

The underlying technology of flight is Bernoulli’s Principle, which explains why an airplane wing creates lift. Of course, the technology in play has no knowledge of whether the airplane wing is connected to a ‘life-flight’ rescue mission, or to a plane carrying bombs to be dropped on civilian targets.

When Orville Wright was asked in 1948 after the devastation of air power during World War II whether he regretted inventing the airplane he answered:

“No, I don’t have any regrets about my part in the invention of the airplane, though no one could deplore more than I do the destruction it has caused. We dared to hope we had invented something that would bring lasting peace to the earth. But we were wrong. I feel about the airplane much the same as I do in regard to fire. That is, I regret all the terrible damage caused by fire, but I think it is good for the human race that someone discovered how to start fires, and that we have learned how to put fire to thousands of important uses.”

Orville’s insight that technology does not comprehend morality—and that any advances in technology can be used for both beneficial and troubling purposes.  This dual use of technology is something our industry has struggled with for years.

Cryptography is a prime example. The exact same algorithm can be used to protect data from theft, or to hold an individual or organization for ransom. This matters more than ever given that we now encrypt 75% of the world’s web traffic, protecting over 150 exabytes of data each month.  At the same time, organizations and individuals are enduring record exploitation through ransomware.

The RSA Conference itself was at the epicenter of a debate during the 1990’s on whether it was possible to conditionally use strong encryption only in desirable places, or only for desirable functions.  At the time, the U.S. government classified strong encryption as a munition along with strict export restrictions.   Encryption is ultimately just math and it’s not possible to stop someone from doing math.  We must be intellectually honest about our technologies; how they work, what the precursors to use them are and when, how and if they should be contained.

Our shared challenge in cybersecurity is to capture lightning in a bottle, to seize the promise of advances like flight, while remaining aware of the risks that come with technology.  Let’s take a closer look at that aspect.

History repeats itself

Regardless of how you define it, AI is without a doubt the new foundation for cybersecurity defense. The entire industry is tapping into the tremendous power that this technology offers to better defend our environments. It enables better detection of threats beyond what we’ve seen in the past, and helps us out-innovate our cyber adversaries. The combination of threat intelligence and artificial intelligence, together or human-machine teaming provides us far better security outcomes—faster—than either capability on their own.

Not only does AI enable us to build stronger cyber defense technology, but also helps us solve other key issues such as addressing our talent shortage. We can now delegate many tasks to free up our human security professionals to focus on the most critical and complex aspects of defending our organizations.

“It’s just math..”

Like encryption, AI is just math. It can enhance criminal enterprises in addition to its beneficial purposes. McAfee Chief Data Scientist Celeste Fralick joined me on stage during this week’s keynote to run through some examples of how this math can be applied for good or ill. (visit here to view the keynote).  From machine learning fueled crime-spree predictors to DeepFake videos to highly effective attack obfuscation, we touch on them all.

It’s important to understand that the cybersecurity industry is very different from other sectors that use AI and machine learning. For a start, in many other industries, there isn’t an adversary trying to confuse the models.

AI is extremely fragile, therefore one focus area of the data science group at McAfee is Adversarial Machine Learning. Where we’re working to better understand how attackers could try to evade or poison machine learning models.  We are developing models that are more resilient to attacks using techniques such as feature reduction, adding noise, distillation and others.

AI and False Positives: A Warning

We must recognize that this technology, while incredibly powerful, is also incredibly different from what many cybersecurity defenders worked with historically. In order to deal with issues such as evasion, models will need to be tuned to high levels of sensitivity. The high level of sensitivity makes false positives inherent and something we must fully work into the methodology for using the technology.

False positive can have catastrophic results.  For an excellent example of this, watch the video of the keynote here if you haven’t seen it yet.  I talk through the quintessential example of how a false positive almost started World War III and nuclear Armageddon.

The Take-Away

As with fire and flight, how we manage new innovations is the real story.  Recognizing technology does not have a moral compass is key.  Our adversaries will use the technology to make their attacks more effective and we must move forward with our eyes wide open to all aspects of how technology will be used…. Its benefits, limitations and how it will be used against us.

 

Please see the video recording of our keynote speech RSA Conference 2019: https://www.rsaconference.com/events/us19/presentations/keynote-mcafee

 

The post McAfee CTO @ RSA: Catching Lightning in a Bottle or Burning Bridges to the Future? appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and More at RSAC 2019

Last week, the RSA Conference painted San Francisco’s Moscone Center purple with the theme ‘Better’, and the cybersecurity industry did not disappoint in making the digital world a better and safer place. Below, we’re sharing a few McAfee highlights from this year’s event.

Behind the Scenes of MGM Resorts’ Digital Transformation at CSA Summit

In its tenth year at the RSA Conference, the CSA Summit welcomed Rajiv Gupta, Senior Vice President, Cloud Security Business Unit at McAfee and Scott Howitt, Senior Vice President & Chief Information Security Officer at MGM Resorts International to the stage. During the keynote, Howitt discussed MGM’s digital transformation and how adopting the cloud into MGM’s business model resulted in delivering a modern experience to customers and more engaged and productive employees. We also heard Gupta share statistics from our Cloud Report on how cloud data distribution has changed dramatically ,which now requires new and better solutions. Before attendees headed out for lunch, Howitt and Gupta closed the first half of the CSA summit by solidifying the positive impact the cloud can have on enterprise businesses. 

Tapping into the Tremendous Power of Artificial Intelligence at RSAC

On Tuesday, SVP and Chief Technology Officer, Steve Grobman and Chief Data Scientist, Dr. Celeste Fralick, took the mainstage at RSAC. During their keynote, Grobman and Fralick discussed how the industry needs to think about artificial intelligence, its power, how it can be used against us and its adversarial uses. Fralick shared how “most people don’t realize how fragile AI and machine learning can really be” and voiced how her team is involved in a technical area called the adversarial machine learning, where they study ways that adversaries can invade or poison machine learning classifier. In closing, Grobman told RSA attendees that “we must embrace AI but never ignore its limitations. It’s just math. It’s fragile. And there is a cost to both false positives and false negatives.”

EXPO- nentially Better

This year’s RSAC expo didn’t disappoint, with over 400 exhibitors showcasing unique content from the world’s top cybersecurity minds and the latest security solutions. Every day our booth was full as we connected with our customers, partners, and prospects. At this year’s conference, we hosted a fun and interactive Capture the Flag challenge which tested the investigative and analytical skills of RSA attendees. Contestants were given various challenges and received “flag” details on how to complete each challenge as quickly and accurately as possible.

RSAC was full of announcements with new and better products along with the buzzing of cybersecurity professionals making better connections with peers from around the world, with the same goal of keeping the digital world safe and making the real world a better place.

The post Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and More at RSAC 2019 appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

The Best Ways to Catch McAfee at RSA Conference 2019

In just a few weeks, San Francisco will be taken over by cybersecurity professionals and vendors at Moscone Center for the 2019 RSA Conference. There’s a lot packed into the conference—that’s why we’re breaking down the best ways to see McAfee in action. So take out your calendars and make note of the events below.

McAfee Leadership Takes the Stage

CSA Summit Keynote: Case Study: Behind the Scenes of MGM Resorts’ Digital Transformation
Monday, March 4 | 11:35 am – 11:55 am | Moscone Center

Rajiv Gupta, Senior Vice President, Cloud Security Business Unit, McAfee

Scott Howitt, Senior Vice President & Chief Information Security Officer, MGM Resorts International

As a leader in their industry, MGM is transforming into a digital business by aggressively adopting the cloud to make their employees more engaged and productive and to deliver modern experiences to their customers. Join Rajiv Gupta, SVP of McAfee’s Cloud Business, and Scott Howitt, SVP and CISO for MGM Resorts International, to hear how MGM is protecting their enterprise data across the whole spectrum of their evolving infrastructure, from on-prem, to the device, to their SaaS, IaaS and PaaS cloud instances. More, here.

 

Session: #Ransomware – The Rise, Death and Resurrection of Digital Extortion
Monday, March 4 | 4:45 pm – 5:15 pm | Session Code: SEM-M03

John Fokker

Head of Cyber Investigations

Raj Samani

Chief Scientist, McAfee Fellow

 

Hear from cybercrime experts on the successes and lessons learned from the No More Ransom initiative, an online portal that has prevented millions of dollars in ransom payments to cybercriminals. Recent statistics point to a decrease in the number of ransomware variants. So, is ransomware dead? Not so fast. Get up to speed on what’s new in the ongoing effort to combat the threat of ransomware. More, here.

Keynote: Lightning in a Bottle, or Burning Down the House?
Tuesday, March 5 | 8:35 am – 8:55 am | RSA, West Stage

Dr. Celeste Fralick 

Chief Data Scientist 

Steve Grobman

Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer

 

Fire. In the wild, it’s a force for destruction. Controlled, it powers civilization’s forward evolution. But containing phenomena—natural or manmade—is a devilish challenge. Today’s regulatory hotspots include AI and quantum computing, because innovations that strengthen defenses can also fuel targeted threats. The weaponization of AI to amplify cyberattack impacts is enough to give anyone pause, so discussion of export controls on these and other technologies is a worthy conversation. What is the path forward to advance and protect human progress? How do we nurture sparks of innovation without burning bridges to the future? More, here.

Session: Using Machine Learning to Improve Security Predictions
Tuesday, March 5 | 11:00 am – 11:50 am | Session Code: SPO2-T06

Grant Bourzikas

Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) & Vice President of McAfee Labs Operations

 

 

 

Organizations are overwhelmed by data and dependent on outdated (nonpredictive) tools and methods. Security companies can’t keep up with the frequency of attacks, 50% of which are missed by traditional antivirus programs. In this session, McAfee’s CISO will share his experiences, providing valuable information for security organizations to predict attacks by relying on data science and machine learning. More, here.

Session: Mulitparty Vulnerability Disclosure: From Here to Where?
Wednesday, March 6 | 9:20 am – 10:10 am | Session Code: PDAC-W03

As the world grows ever more dependent on complex technological systems, the risk of broadly impactful vulnerabilities in software and hardware is driving the need for improvements in how the global ecosystem addresses identification and disclosure of those vulnerabilities. This panel will discuss what works, what doesn’t, and suggest a path forward that can benefit everyone globally. More, here.

Moderator: John Banghart, Senior Director, Venable

Panelists: Kent Landfield, Chief Standards and Technology Policy Strategist, McAfee LLC

Art Manion, Vulnerability Analysis Technical Manager, CERT Coordination Center

Audrey Plonk, Director, Global Security Policy, Intel Corporation

Session: Law Enforcement: The Secret Weapon in the CISO’s Toolkit
Friday, March 8 | 11:10 am – 12:00 pm | Session Code: AIR-F03

John Fokker

Head of Cyber Investigations

 

 

 

This session will show you how to get the most out of working with law enforcement agencies (LEA) before, during or after a security breach. Learn why partnering with law enforcement can be a valuable strategic asset in the CISO’s ever-expanding toolbox of security measures. More, here.

Hack Your Way Through the Crowds at the McAfee Booth

We’re hosting a fun and interactive Capture the Flag challenge at our RSA booth to test the investigative and analytical skills of RSA attendees. Contestants will be given various challenges and will receive “flag” details on how to complete each challenge as quickly and accurately as possible. Want to know who is in the lead? Don’t worry, we’ll have a live scoreboard. The winner of the RSA Capture the Flag contest will get bragging rights and a cool prize to take home. Visit us at booth #N5745 in the North Hall.

Cloud Security BarCade Challenge

Tuesday, March 5 | 6:00 pm – Midnight | Coin-Op Game Room, San Francisco | 508 4th Street

We’re hosting an epic cloud security networking event at Coin-Op Game Room in San Francisco! What’s the challenge? Come out to see us and find out. There will be prizes, games, food, networking, and more. Register here.

RSA After-Hours Social & Cloud Security Panels

Wednesday, March 6 | 6:30 pm – 11:00 pm | Mourad, San Francisco | 140 New Montgomery Street

We’re bringing the cloud community together for a night of networking at Mourad, so grab your peers and head over to the after-hours social. We will have a DJ, awesome food, creative libations, and a VIP area upstairs for a private whiskey tasting. Throughout the night, we’ll be hosting cloud security panels, where you’ll hear perspectives from industry experts on the current security landscape, best practices, and how to elevate your cloud security posture. Register here and join us as we close out RSA at the after-hours social of the year.

There’s a lot to look forward to at RSA 2019, so be sure to stop by booth #N5745 in the North Hall for demos, theater sessions, and more. Feel free to use code XSU9MCAFEE for a free RSAC expo pass. Also, be sure to follow @McAfee for real-time updates from the show throughout the week.

The post The Best Ways to Catch McAfee at RSA Conference 2019 appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Customers Blame Companies not Hackers for Data Breaches

RSA Security latest search reveals over half (57%) of consumers blame companies ahead of hackers if their data is stolen. Consumer backlash in response to the numerous high-profile data breaches in recent years has exposed one of the hidden risks of digital transformation: loss of customer trust.

The RSA Data Privacy & Security Survey 2019 identified that companies have lost the trust of customers as a disconnect has formed between how companies are using customer data and how consumers expect their data to be used.

Despite the fact that consumers harbour heightened concerns about their privacy, they continue to exhibit poor cyber hygiene, with 83% of users admitting that they reuse the same passwords across many sites, leaving them more vulnerable.

Key takeaways from the RSA Data Privacy study, include:

  • Context matters: Individuals across all demographics are concerned about their financial/banking data, as well as sensitive information such as passwords, but other areas of concern vary dramatically by generation, nationality and even gender. For example, younger demographics are more comfortable with their data being used and collected than older survey respondents. 
  • Privacy expectations are cultural: Consumers respond to data privacy differently based on their nationality due to cultural factors, current events and high-profile data breaches in their respective countries. For example, in the months of the GDPR being implemented, German attitudes shifted in favour of stricter data privacy expectations, with 42% wanting to protect location data in 2018 versus only 29 percent in 2017.
  • Personalisation remains a puzzle: Countless studies have demonstrated that personalised experiences increase user activity and purchasing. However, the survey results showed that respondents do not want personalized services at the expense of their privacy. In fact, a mere 17% of respondents view tailored advertisements as ethical, and only 24% believe personalisation to create tailored newsfeeds is ethical. 
“With a growing number of high-profile data breaches, questions around the ethical use of data and privacy missteps, consumers increasingly want to know how their data is being collected, managed and shared,” said Nigel Ng, Vice President of International, RSA. “Now is the time for organisations to evaluate their growing digital risks, doubling down on customer privacy and security. Today’s leaders must be vigilant about transforming their cybersecurity postures to manage today’s digital risks in a way that ensures consumer trust and confidence in their business.