Category Archives: patching

Cyber Security Roundup for May 2020

A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, April 2020.

As well reported, UK foreign exchange firm Travelex business operations were brought to a standstill after its IT systems were severely hit by the Sodinokibi ransomware at the start of the year. It was reported that
 REvil group were behind the attack and had stolen 5Gbs of customer personal data, and then demanded $6 million (£4.6m) in ransom. The Wall Street Journal reported in April 2020 that Travelex had reached a deal, paying $2.3 million (£1.84m) in Bitcoin to the cybercriminals. This sort of response incentivises future ransomware activity against all other businesses and could lead to an inflation of future cyber-extortion demands in my opinion.

Cognizant, a US large digital solutions provider and IT consultancy, was reportedly hit by the Maze ransomware.  Maze, previously known as the 'ChaCha' ransomware, like the Travelex attack, not only encrypts victim's files but steals sensitive data from the IT systems as well. Enabling the bad guys to threaten the publishing of the stolen data if the organisation cough up to their cyber-extortion demands, so the bad guys are very much rinsing and repeating lucrative attacks.

Microsoft wrote an excellent blog covering the 'motley crew' of ransomware payloads  The blog covers ransomware payloads said to be straining security operations especially in health care, Microsoft warned, urging security teams to look for signs of credential theft and lateral movement activities that herald attacks.

Researchers continue to be busy in exposing large sensitive datasets within misconfigured cloud services.  In April researchers reported 14 million Ring user details exposed in misconfigured AWS open database, fitness software Kinomap had 42 million user details exposed in another misconfigured database, and Maropost had 95 million users exposed, also in a misconfigured database.

Nintendo confirmed 160,000 of its users' accounts had been accessed, exposing PII and Nintendo store accounts. The gaming giant Nintendo said from April, its user's accounts were accessed through the Nintendo Network ID (NNID), which is primarily used for Switch gaming. The company is unaware exactly how the intrusion had occurred, saying it “seems to have been made by impersonating login to “Nintendo Network ID. “If you use the same password for your NNID and Nintendo account, your balance and registered credit card / PayPal may be illegally used at My Nintendo Store or Nintendo eShop. Please set different passwords for NNID and Nintendo account,” Nintendo said. In response to these issues the company has abolished user’s ability to log into their Nintendo account via NNID and passwords for both NNID and Nintendo accounts are being reset and the company is recommending multi-factor authentication be set up for each account.  The account breaches weren't the only cyber issue affecting Nintendo in April, it reported that a bot, dubbed 'Bird Bot' was used by a reseller to buy up Nintendo Switches before customers could make their Switch purchase from Nintendo. The bot using reseller benefits at the expense of consumers, in buying up all available Switches directly from Nintendo, they are able to sell them on for higher prices, so making a quick and easy tidy profit, due to the current high demand of Switches and lack of supply.

April was a busy month for security updates, Microsoft released security patches fixing 113 vulnerabilities on Patch Tuesday and an out-of-band patch for Teams found by researchers at CyberArk. Patch Tuesday for a quiet one for Adobe, though they released fixes for 21 critical vulnerabilities in illustrator and Bridge at the end of the month.  Oracle released a huge 397 fixes for 450 CVEs in over 100 products, which I think is a new record for a patch release!  

Sophos said it and its customers were attacked when a previously unknown SQL injection vulnerability in their physical and virtual XG Firewall units was exploited. “The attack affected systems configured with either the administration interface (HTTPS admin service) or the user portal exposed on the WAN zone. In addition, firewalls manually configured to expose a firewall service (e.g. SSL VPN) to the WAN zone that shares the same port as the admin or User Portal were also affected,Sophos said.

There were security critical patch releases for Mozilla Firefox, Chrome (twice), and for 8 Cisco products. A bunch of VMware patches for including a CVSS scored 10 (highest possible) in vCenter, a critical in vRealize Log Insight and a critical cross-site scripting vulnerability in ESXi 6.5 and 6.7. And finally, on the patch front, Intel decided to discontinue multiple products, as it was unable to keep ahead of patch their vulnerabilities.

Stay safe, safe home and watch for the scams.

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    How to Keep Your Video Conferencing Meetings Secure

    Guest Post by By Tom Kellermann (Head Cybersecurity Strategist, VMware Carbon Black)

    The sudden and dramatic shift to a mobile workforce has thrust video conferencing into the global spotlight and evolved video conferencing vendors from enterprise communication tools to critical infrastructure.

    During any major (and rapid) technology adoption, cyberattackers habitually follow the masses in hopes of launching an attack that could lead to a pay day or give them a competitive advantage. This has not been lost on global organisations’ security and IT teams, who are quickly working to make sure their employees’ privacy and data remains secure.

    Here are some high-level tips to help keep video conferencing secure.

    Update the Application
    Video conferencing providers are regularly deploying software updates to ensure that security holes are mitigated.  Take advantage of their diligence and update the app prior to using it every time.

    Lock meetings down and set a strong password
    Make sure that only invited attendees can join a meeting. Using full sentences with special characters included, rather than just words or numbers, can be helpful. Make sure you are not sharing the password widely, especially in public places and never on social media. Waiting room features are critical for privacy as the meeting host can serve as a final triage to make sure only invited participants are attending. Within the meeting, the host can restrict sharing privileges, leading to smoother meetings and ensuring that uninvited guests are not nefariously sharing materials. 

    Discussing sensitive information
    If sensitive material must be discussed, ensure that the meeting name does not suggest it is a top-secret meeting, which would make it a more attractive target for potential eavesdroppers.  Using code words to depict business topics is recommended during the cyber crime wave we are experiencing.

    Restrict the sharing of sensitive files to approved file-share technologies, not as part of the meeting itself
    Using an employee sharing site that only employees have access to (and has multi-factor authentication in place) is a great way to make sure sensitive files touch the right eyes only.  This should be mandated as this is a huge Achilles heel.

    Use a VPN to protect network traffic while using the platform 
    With so many employees working remotely, using a virtual private network (VPN) can help better secure internet connections and keep private information private via encryption. Public WiFi can be a gamble as it only takes one malicious actor to cause damage.  Do not use public WiFi, especially in airports or train stations.  Cyber criminals lurk in those locations.

    If you can, utilise two networks on your home WiFi router, one for business and the other for personal use.
    Make sure that your work computer is only connected to a unique network in your home. All other personal devices – including your family’s – should not be using the same network. The networks and routers in your home should be updated regularly and, again, should use a complex password. Additionally, you should be the only system administrator on your network and all devices that connect to it.

    All of us have a role to play in mitigating the cyber crime wave.  Please remember these best practices the next time you connect. Stay safe online

    Also related - How Safe are Video Messaging Apps such as Zoom?

    Cyber Security Roundup for April 2020

    A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, March 2020.

    The UK went into lockdown in March due to the coronavirus pandemic, these are unprecedented and uncertain times. Unfortunately, cybercriminals are taking full advantage of this situation, both UK citizens and 
    businesses have been hit with a wave of COVID-19 themed phishing emails, and scam social media and text messages (smishing). Which prompted warnings by the UK National Cyber Security Centre and UK Banks, and a crackdown by the UK Government.
    Convincing COVID-19 Scam Text Message (Smishing)

    I have not had the opportunity to analyse a copy of the above scam text message (smishing), but it looks like the weblink displayed is not as it appears. My guess is the link is not part of the gov.uk domain, but the attacker has used an international domain name homograph attack, namely using foreign font characters to disguise the true address of a malicious website that is linked.

    I was privileged to be on The Telegraph Coronavirus Podcast on 31st March, where I was asked about the security of video messaging apps, a transcript of what I advised is here. Further coronavirus cybersecurity advice was posted on my blog, on working from home securely and to provide awareness of coronavirus themed message scams.  It was also great to see the UK payment card contactless limit increased from £30 to £45 to help prevent coronavirus spread.

    March threat intelligence reports shone a light to the scale of the cybercriminal shift towards exploiting COVID-19 crisis for financial gains. Check Point Global Threat Index reported a spike in the registration of coronavirus themed domains names, stating more than 50% of these new domains are likely to be malicious in nature. Proofpoint reports for more 80% of the threat landscape is using coronavirus themes in some way.  There has been a series of hacking attempts directly against the World Health Organisation (WHO), from DNS hijacking to spread a malicious COVID-19 app to a rather weird plot to spread malware through a dodgy anit-virus solution

    Away from the deluge of coronavirus cybersecurity news and threats, Virgin Media were found to have left a database open, which held thousands of customer records exposed, and T-Mobile's email vendor was hacked, resulting in the breach of their customers and employees personal data.  

    International hotel chain Marriot reported 5.2 million guest details were stolen after an unnamed app used by guests was hacked. According to Marriots online breach notification, stolen data included guest name, address, email address, phone number, loyalty account number and point balances, employer, gender, birthdays (day and month only), airline loyalty program information, and hotel preferences. It was only on 30th November 2018 Marriott disclosed a breach of 383 million guestsTony Pepper, CEO at Egress said “Marriott International admitted that it has suffered another data breach, affecting up to 5.2 million people. This follows the well-documented data breach highlighted in November 2018 where the records of approximately 339 million guests were exposed in a catastrophic cybersecurity incident. Having already received an intention to fine from the ICO to the tune of £99m for that, Marriott will be more than aware of its responsibility to ensure that the information it shares and stores is appropriately protected. Not only does this news raise further concerns for Marriott, but it also serves as a reminder to all organisations that they must constantly be working to enhance their data security systems and protocols to avoid similar breaches. It will be interesting to see if further action is taken by the ICO”

    Five billion records were found to be exposed by UK security company Elasticsearch.  Researchers also found an Amazon Web Services open MongoDB database of eight million European Union citizen retail sales records was left exposed, which included personal and financial information.  And Let’s Encrypt revoked over 3 million TLS certificates due to a bug which certification rechecking

    March was another busy month for security updates, patch Tuesday saw Microsoft release fixes for 116 vulnerabilities and there was an out-of-band Microsoft fix for 'EternallDarkness' bug on 10th March, but a zero-day exploited vulnerability in Windows remained unpatched by the Seattle based software giants.  Adobe released a raft of security patches, as did Apple (over 30 patches), Google, Cisco, DrayTek, VMware, and Drupal.

    Stay safe, safe home and watch for the scams.

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        How Safe are Video Messaging Apps such as Zoom?

        I was privileged to be part of The Telegraph Coronavirus Podcast today, where I was asked about the security of video messaging apps.



        'How safe are video messaging apps such as Zoom, and what should users bear in mind when using them?'

        My reply...
        Video messaging apps are an essential communication tool for at home and within businesses, especially during the COVID-19 lockdown period. They are generally safe to use but there are a few security risks which users should be aware of.

        Our increased use of video messaging apps has not gone unnoticed by cybercriminals, who are seeking to exploit the increase of use by sending phishing emails, social media scam messages and even scam text messages, with fake invitations to video messaging app meetings.

        Typically, these scam messages will entice you into either opening a malicious attachment or click a web link which directs to a malicious website. The ultimate aim of these cyberattacks is to deliver malicious software, such as ransomware which locks your PC and demands a ransom payment to unlock, scam a payment, or steal your personal information which can be resold to other cybercriminals on the dark web.

        So, never open an attachment or click on any links within any unexpected or suspicious emails, social media messages and text messages.

        The next piece of advice is to ensure your video messaging app is always kept up-to-date. Luckily most modern smartphones and computer operating systems will automatically update your apps, but it is always worth double-checking and not to suppress any app updates from occurring, as often the app updates are fixing security flaws.

        And finally, on home computers and laptops, when not using video messaging apps, either cover your webcam with a piece of tape or face your webcam towards a wall or ceiling, just in case your computer is covertly compromised and a malicious actor gains access to your computer's webcam.


        Additional
        One tip I didn't have time to say on the podcast, is always ensure your video chats are set to private, using a strong password to prevent ZoomBombingRecent reportshave shown a series of “Zoombombing” incidents lately, where unwanted guests have joined in on open calls. 

        Bharat Mistry, Principal Security Strategist at Trend Micro on Zoom advises “Although not alone in being targeted, Zoom has been the subject of some of the highest-profile incidents so far this year. Fortunately, there are things you can do to keep your business safe.

        It’s all about taking advantage of unsecure settings in the app, (and possibly using brute-force tools to crack meeting IDs). With access to a meeting, hackers could harvest highly sensitive and/or market-critical corporate information, or even spread malware via a file transfer feature.

        Hackers know users are looking en masse for ways to communicate during government lockdowns. By creating legitimate-looking Zoom links and websites, they could steal financial details, spread malware or harvest Zoom ID numbers, allowing them to infiltrate virtual meetings. One vendor discovered 2,000 new domains had been registered in March alone, over two-thirds of the total for the year so far.

        Risk mitigation:
        The good news is that there are several things you can do to mitigate the security risks associated with Zoom. The most basic are: 
        • Ensure Zoom is always on the latest software version
        • Build awareness of Zoom phishing scams into user training programmes. Users should only download the Zoom client from a trusted site and check for anything suspicious in the meeting URL when joining a meeting
        • Ensure all home workers have anti-malware including phishing detection installed from a reputable vendor
        Organisational preparedness:
        Next, it’s important to revisit those administrative settings in the app, to reduce the opportunities for hackers and Zoombombers. Fortunately, automatically generated passwords are now switched on by default, and the use of personal meeting IDs are switched off, meaning Zoom will create a random, one-off ID for each meeting. These setting should be kept as is. But organisations can do more, including:
        • Ensure you also generate a meeting ID automatically for recurring meetings
        • Set screen-sharing to “host only” to prevent uninvited guests from sharing disruptive content
        • Don’t share any meeting IDs online
        • Disable “file transfers” to mitigate risk of malware
        • Make sure that only authenticated users can join meetings
        • Lock the meeting once it’s started to prevent anyone new joining
        • Use waiting room feature, so the host can only allow attendees from a pre-assigned register
        • Play a sound when someone enters or leaves the room
        • Allow host to put attendees on hold, temporarily removing them from a meeting if necessary”

        Cyber Security Roundup for March 2020

        A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, February 2020.

        Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council became the latest UK organisation to become the victim of a mass ransomware attack which started on 8th February.  The north-east Council's servers, PCs, mobile devices, websites and even phone lines have been down for three weeks at the time of writing. A Redcar and Cleveland councillor told the Guardian it would take several months to recover and the cost is expected to between £11m and £18m to repair the damage done. A significant sum for the cash-strapped council, which confirmed their outage as ransomware caused 19 days after the attack. The strain of ransomware involved and the method initial infiltration into the council's IT systems has yet to be confirmed.


        The English FA shut down its investigation into allegations Liverpool employees hacked into Manchester City's scouting system. The Manchester club also made news headlines after UEFA banned it from European competition for two years, a ban based on alleged stolen internal email evidence obtained by a hacker.  Read The Billion Pound Manchester City Hack for further details.

        The UK government said GRU (Russian military intelligence) was behind a massive cyber-attack which knocked out more than 2,000 websites in the country of Georgia last year, in "attempt to undermine Georgia's sovereignty". Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab described it as "totally unacceptable".

        The United States deputy assistant secretary for cyber and communications, Robert Strayer, said he did not believe the UK government's January 2020 decision to allow Huawei limited access to UK's 5G infrastructure was final. 'Our understanding is that there might have been some initial decisions made but conversations are continuing," he told the BBC. Read The UK Government Huawei Dilemma and the Brexit Factor for more on UK government's Huawei political, economic and security debate.

        Following Freedom of Information requests made by Viasat, it reported UK government employees had either lost or stolen 2,004 mobiles and laptops between June 2018 and June 2019.

        According to figures by the FBI, cybercriminals netted £2.7bn ($3.5bn) from cyber-crimes report 2019, with phishing and extortion remaining the most common method of scamming people. These FBI reported cybercrime losses have tripled over the past 5 years. The FBI concluded that cyber scam techniques are becoming more sophisticated, making it harder for original people to tell "real from fake".  A new Kaspersky report backs up the FBI, finding a 9.5% growth in financial phishing during the final quarter of 2019.

        The Labour party is facing data protection fines of up £15m for failing to protect their members' personal data. The Information Commissioner's Office confirmed the Labour Party would be the focus of their investigation since it is legally responsible for securing members' information as the "data controller".

        This month's cloud misconfiguration breach award goes to french sports retail giant Decathlon, after 123 million customer records were found to be exposed by researchers at vpnMentor .  Leaked data included employee usernames, unencrypted passwords and personally identifiable information (PII) including social security numbers, full names, addresses, mobile phone numbers, addresses and birth dates. “The leaked Decathlon Spain database contains a veritable treasure trove of employee data and more. It has everything that a malicious hacker would, in theory, need to use to take over accounts and gain access to private and even proprietary information,” said vpnMentor.

        If you have a 'Ring' smart camera doorbell (IoT) device then may have noticed Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) was mandated in February.  Ring's stance of enforcing a strengthening of security may be related to several recent high-profile home camera hack reports.
        Ring: An IoT device's security improved by mandated 2FA

        The facial recognition company Clearview AI advised a hacker stole its client list database. The firm works with law enforcement agencies and gained notoriety after admitting it had scrapped billions of individuals photos off the internet.

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        Cyber Security Roundup for February 2020

        A roundup of UK focused cyber and information security news stories, blog posts, reports and threat intelligence from the previous calendar month, January 2020.

        After years of dither and delay the UK government finally nailed its colours to the mast, no not Brexit but Huawei, permitting 'limited use' of the Chinese Telecoms giant's network appliances within the UK's new 5G infrastructure. Whether this is a good decision depends more on individual political persuasion than national security interest, so just like Brexit the general view on the decision is binary, either its a clever compromise or a complete sell out of UK national security. I personally believe the decision is more about national economics than national security, as I previously blogged in 'The UK Government Huawei Dilemma and the Brexit Factor'. The UK government is playing a delicate balancing to safeguard potentially massive trade deals with both of the world's largest economic superpowers, China and United States. An outright US style ban Huawei would seriously jeopardise billions of pounds worth of Chinese investment into the UK economy. While on the security front, Huawei's role will be restricted to protect the UK's critical national infrastructure, with Huawei's equipment banned from use within the core of the 5G infrastructure. The UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) published a document which provides guidance to high risk network providers on the use of Huawei tech.
        UK Gov agrees to 'limited' Huawei involvement within UK 5G

        UK business targeted ransomware continues to rear its ugly head in 2020, this time global foreign exchange firm Travelex's operations were all brought to a shuddering halt after a major ransomware attack took down Travelex's IT systems. Travelex services impacted included their UK business, international websites, mobile apps, and white-labelled services for the likes of Tesco, Sainsburys, Virgin Money, Barclays and RBS. The ransomware in question was named as Sodinokibi, with numerous media reports strongly suggesting the Sodinokibi ransomware infiltrated the Travelex network through unpatched vulnerable Pulse Secure VPN servers, which the National Cyber Security Centre had apparently previously detected and warned Travelex about many months earlier. Could be some truth in this, given the Sodinokibi ransomware is known to infect through remote access systems, including vulnerable Pulse Secure VPN servers. The cybercriminal group behind the attack, also known as Sodin and REvil, demanded £4.6 million in ransom payment, and had also claimed to have taken 5Gb of Travelex customer data. Travelex reported no customer data had been breached, however, its money exchange services remained offline for well over two weeks after reporting the incident, with the firm advising it expected most of its travel exchange services to be back operational by the end of January.

        The same Sodinokibi criminal group behind the Travelex attack also claimed responsibility for what was described by German automotive parts supplier Gedia Automotive Group, as a 'massive cyber attack'. Gedia said it would take weeks to months before its IT systems were up and running as normal. According to analysis by US cyber security firm Bad Packets, the German firm also had an unpatched Pulse Secure VPN server on its network perimeter which left it exposed to the ransomware attack. Gedia patched their server VPN on 4th January.

        Leeds based medical tech company Tissue Regenix halted its US manufacturing operation after unauthorised party accessed its IT systems. To date there hasn't been any details about the nature of this cyber attack, but a manufacturing shutdown is a hallmark of a mass ransomware infection. Reuters reported shares in the company dropped 22% following their cyber attack disclosure.

        London based marine consultancy company LOC was hacked and held to be ransom by cybercriminals. It was reported computers were 'locked' and 300Gb of company data were stolen by a criminal group, investigations on this hack are still ongoing.

        Its seem every month I report a massive data breach due to the misconfiguration of a cloud server, but I never expected one of leading global cloud providers, Microsoft, to be caught out by such a school boy error. Microsoft reported a database misconfiguration of their Elasticsearch servers exposed 250 million customer support records between 5th and 19th December 2019. Some of the non-redacted data exposed included customer email addresses; IP addresses; locations; descriptions of customer support claims and cases; Microsoft support agent emails; case numbers, resolutions and remarks; and confidential internal notes. It is not known if any unauthorised parties had accessed any of the leaked data.

        Cyber attacks against the UK defence industry hit unprecedented highs according government documentation obtained by Sky News. Sky News revealed the MoD and its partners failed to protect military and defence data in 37 incidents in 2017 and 34 incidents in first 10 months of 2018, with military data exposed to nation-level cyber actors on dozens of occasions.

        It was another fairly busy month for Microsoft patches, including an NSA revealed critical flaw in Windows 10. January also saw the end of security updates support for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008, unless you pay Microsoft extra for extended support.

        According to a World Economic Forum (WEF) study, most of the world's airports cybersecurity is not up to scratch. WEF reported 97 of the world’s 100 largest airports have vulnerable web and mobile applications, misconfigured public cloud and dark web leaks. Findings summary were:

        • 97% of the websites contain outdated web software.
        • 24% of the websites contain known and exploitable vulnerabilities.
        • 76% and 73% of the websites are not compliant with GDPR and PCI DSS, respectively.
        • 100% of the mobile apps contain at least five external software frameworks.
        • 100% of the mobile apps contain at least two vulnerabilities.
        Elsewhere in the world, it was reported a US Department of Defence contractor had its web servers (and thus its websites) taken down by the Ryuk ransomware. Houston-based steakhouse Landry advised it was hit by a point-of-sale malware attack which stole customer payment card data. Stolen customer payment card data taken from a Pennsylvania-based convenience store and petrol station operator was found for sale online. Ahead of the Superbowl LIV Twitter and Facebook accounts for 15 NFL teams were hacked. The hacking group OurMine took responsibility for the NFL franchise attacks, which said it was to demonstrate internet security was "still low" and had to be improved upon. Sonos apologised after accidentally revealing hundreds of customer email addresses to each other. And a ransomware took a US Maritime base offline for 30 hours.

        Dallas County Attorney finally applied some common-sense, dropping charges against two Coalfire Red Teamers. The two Coalfire employees had been arrested on 11th September 2019 while conducting a physical penetration test of the Dallas County courthouse. The Perry News quoted a police report which said upon arrest the two men stated, “they were contracted to break into the building for Iowa courts to check the security of the building". After the charges were dropped at the end of January Coalfire CEO Tom McAndrew said, 'With positive lessons learned, a new dialogue now begins with a focus on improving best practices and elevating the alignment between security professionals and law enforcement”. Adding “We’re grateful to the global security community for their support throughout this experience.”


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        Cyber Security Roundup for January 2020

        A roundup of UK focused cyber and information security news stories, blog posts, reports and threat intelligence from the previous calendar month, December 2019.

        Happy New Year!  The final month of the decade was a pretty quiet one as major security news and data breaches go, given cybers attack have become the norm in the past decade. The biggest UK media security story was saved for the very end of 2019, with the freshly elected UK government apologising after it had accidentally published online the addresses of the 1,097 New Year Honour recipients.  Among the addresses posted were those of Sir Elton John, cricketer and BBC 'Sports Personality of the Year' Ben Stokes, former Conservative Party leader Iain Duncan Smith, 'Great British Bakeoff Winner' Nadiya Hussain, and former Ofcom boss Sharon White. The Cabinet Office said it was "looking into how this happened", probably come down to a 'user error' in my view.

        An investigation by The Times found Hedge funds had been eavesdropping on the Bank of England’s press conferences before their official broadcast after its internal systems were compromised. Hedge funds were said to have gained a significant advantage over rivals by purchasing access to an audio feed of Bank of England news conferences. The Bank said it was "wholly unacceptable" and it was investigating further. The Times claimed those paying for the audio feed, via the third party, would receive details of the Bank's news conferences up to eight seconds before those using the television feed - potentially making them money. It is alleged the supplier charged each client a subscription fee and up to £5,000 per use. The system, which had been misused by the supplier since earlier this year, was installed in case the Bloomberg-managed television feed failed.

        A video showing a hacker talking to a young girl in her bedroom via her family's Ring camera was shared on social media. The hacker tells the young girl: "It's Santa. It's your best friend." The Motherboard website reported hackers were offering software making it easier to break into such devices. Ring owner Amazon said the incident was not related to a security breach, but compromised was due to password stuffing, stating "Due to the fact that customers often use the same username and password for their various accounts and subscriptions, bad actors often re-use credentials stolen or leaked from one service on other services."


        Ransomware continues to plague multiple industries and it has throughout 2019, even security companies aren't immune, with Spanish security company Prosegur reported to have been taken down by the Ryuk ransomware.

        Finally, a Microsoft Security Intelligence Report concluded what all security professionals know well, is that implementing Multi-Factor Authenication (MFA) would have thwarted the vast majority of identity attacks. The Microsoft study found reusing passwords across multiple account-based services is still common, of nearly 30 million users and their passwords, password reuse and modifications were common for 52% of users. The same study also found that 30% of the modified passwords and all the reused passwords can be cracked within just 10 guesses. This behaviour puts users at risk of being victims of a breach replay attack. Once a threat actor gets hold of spilled credentials or credentials in the wild, they can try to execute a breach replay attack. In this attack, the actor tries out the same credentials on different service accounts to see if there is a match.

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        Only Focused on Patching? You’re Not Doing Vulnerability Management

        By Anthony Perridge, VP International, ThreatQuotient

        When I speak to security professionals about vulnerability management, I find that there is still a lot of confusion in the market. Most people immediately think I’m referring to getting rid of the vulnerabilities in the hardware and software within their network, but vulnerability management encompasses a much broader scope.

        Vulnerability management is not just vulnerability scanning, the technical task of scanning the network to get a full inventory of all software and hardware and precise versions and current vulnerabilities associated with each. Nor is it vulnerability assessment, a project with a defined start and end that includes vulnerability scanning and a report on vulnerabilities identified and recommendations for remediation. Vulnerability management is a holistic approach to vulnerabilities – an ongoing process to better manage your organisation’s vulnerabilities for the long run. This practice includes vulnerability assessment which, by definition, includes vulnerability scanning, but also other steps as described in the SANS white paper, Implementing a Vulnerability Management Process.

        Just as the process of vulnerability management is broader than you might think, the definition of a vulnerability is as well. A vulnerability is the state of being exposed to the possibility of an attack. The technical vulnerabilities in your network are one component, but there is another important aspect that is often overlooked – the vulnerabilities specific to your company, industry and geography. You can’t only look internally at the state of your assets. You must also look externally at threat actors and the campaigns they are currently launching to get a more complete picture of your vulnerabilities and strengthen your security posture more effectively.

        In The Art of War, Sun Tzu captured the value of this strategy well when he stated, “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

        Prioritise Patching Based on the Threat
        As stated above, with respect to vulnerability management, most security organisations tend to focus on patching but because they don’t have the resources to patch everything quickly, they need to figure out what to patch first. To do this security teams typically take a thumbnail approach – they start with critical assets, the servers where their crown jewels are located, and work down to less critical assets. While a good starting point, their prioritisation decisions are based only on internal information. As Sun Tzu points out, knowing yourself but not the enemy will yield some victories but also defeats.

        Having a platform that serves as a central repository allows you to aggregate internal threat and event data with external threat feeds and normalise that data so that it is in a usable format. By augmenting and enriching information from inside your environment with external threat intelligence about indicators, adversaries and their methods, you can map current attacks targeting your company, industry and geography to vulnerabilities in your assets. Intelligence about a campaign that presents an immediate and actual threat to your organisation leads to a more accurate assessment of priorities and may cause you to change your current patch plan to prioritise those systems that could be attacked at that moment. The result is intelligence-driven patch management that hardens your processes to thwart the attack


        Bridge the Visibility Gap
        Unfortunately, the reality is that not every company has 100% visibility into their assets and vulnerabilities, so mapping external threat data to internal indicators to hone a patch plan sometimes has limited value. However, there is still tremendous value in gathering information from global threat feeds and other external intelligence sources to determine if your business is under a specific attack. The MITRE ATT&CK framework is one such source. It dives deep into adversaries and their methodologies so security analysts can use that information to their advantage.

        Bringing MITRE ATT&CK data into your repository allows you to start from a higher vantage point with information on adversaries and associated tactics, techniques and procedures. You can take a proactive approach, beginning with your organisation’s risk profile, mapping those risks to specific adversaries and their tactics, drilling down to techniques those adversaries are using and then investigating if these techniques could be successful or if related data have been identified in the environment. For example, you may be concerned with APT28 and can quickly answer questions including: What techniques do they apply? Have I seen potential indicators of compromise or possible related system events in my organisation? Are my endpoint technologies detecting those techniques? With answers to questions like these you can discover real threats, determine specific actions to harden your network and processes, and mitigate risk to your business.

        A holistic approach to vulnerability management, that includes knowing yourself and your enemy, allows you to go beyond patching. It provides awareness and intelligence to effectively and efficiently mitigate your organisation’s risk and position your team to address other high-value activities – like detecting, containing and remediating actual attacks, and even anticipating potential threats.

        Cyber Security Roundup for November 2019

        In recent years political motivated cyber-attacks during elections has become an expected norm, so it was no real surprise when the Labour Party reported it was hit with two DDoS cyber-attacks in the run up to the UK general election, which was well publicised by the media. However, what wasn't well publicised was both the Conservative Party and Liberal Democrats Party were also hit with cyber attacks. These weren't nation-state orchestrated cyberattacks either, black hat hacking group Lizard Squad, well known for their high profile DDoS attacks, are believed to be the culprits.

        The launch of Disney Plus didn’t go exactly to plan, without hours of the streaming service going live, compromised Disney Plus user accounts credentials were being sold on the black market for as little as £2.30 a pop. Disney suggested hackers had obtained customer credentials from previously leaked identical credentials, as used by their customers on other compromised or insecure websites, and from keylogging malware. It's worth noting Disney Plus doesn’t use Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA), implementing MFA to protect their customer's accounts would have prevented the vast majority of Disney Plus account compromises in my view.

        Trend Micro reported an insider stolen around 100,000 customer accounts details, with the data used by cyber con artists to make convincing scam phone calls impersonating their company to a number of their customers. In a statement, Trend Micro said it determined the attack was an inside job, an employee used fraudulent methods to access its customer support databases, retrieved the data and then sold it on. “Our open investigation has confirmed that this was not an external hack, but rather the work of a malicious internal source that engaged in a premeditated infiltration scheme to bypass our sophisticated controls,” the company said. The employee behind it was identified and fired, Trend Micro said it is working with law enforcement in an on-going investigation.

        Security researchers found 4 billion records from 1.2 billion people on an unsecured Elasticsearch server. The personal information includes names, home and mobile phone numbers and email addresses and what may be information scraped from LinkedIn, Facebook and other social media sources.

        T-Mobile reported a data breach of some their prepaid account customers. A T-Mobile spokesman said “Our cybersecurity team discovered and shut down malicious, unauthorized access to some information related to your T-Mobile prepaid wireless account. We promptly reported this to authorities”.

        A French hospital was hit hard by a ransomware attack which has caused "very long delays in care". According to a spokesman, medical staff at Rouen University Hospital Centre (CHU) abandon PCs as ransomware had made them unusable, instead, staff returned to the "old-fashioned method of paper and pencil". No details about the strain of the ransomware have been released.

        Microsoft released patches for 74 vulnerabilities in November, including 13 which are rated as critical. One of which was for a vulnerability with Internet Explorer (CVE-2019-1429), an ActiveX vulnerability known to be actively exploited by visiting malicious websites.

        It was a busy month for blog articles and threat intelligence news, all are linked below.

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