Category Archives: Mobile

Expert disclosed passcode bypass bug in iOS 13 a week before its release

A security researcher disclosed a passcode bypass just a week before Apple has planned to release the new iOS 13 operating system, on September 19.

Apple users are thrilled for the release of the iOS 13 mobile operating system planned for September 19, but a security expert could mess up the party.

The security researcher Jose Rodriguez discovered a passcode bypass issue that could be exploited by attackers to gain access to iPhones contacts and other information even on locked devices.

Below the step by step procedure to exploit the passcode bypass:

  1. Reply to an incoming call with a custom message.
  2. Enable the VoiceOver feature.
  3. Disable the VoiceOver feature
  4. Add a new contact to the custom message
  5. Click on the contacts image to open options menu and select “Add to existing contact”. 
  6. When the list of contacts appears, tap on the other contact to view its info.

Below the video PoC published by Rodriguez that shows how to see a device’s contact information.

Rodriguez reported the flaw to Apple on July 17th, 2019, at the time the new iOS version was still in beta. The expert disclosed the issue on September 11th and at the time Apple had still not addressed the flaw.

Experts hope that Apple will be able to fix the bug withing September 19th.

Rodriguez discovered many other passcode bypass issues in the past, in October 2018, a few hours after Apple released iOS 12.1 the iPhone bug hunter Jose Rodriguez found a new passcode bypass issue that could have been exploited to see all contacts’ private information on a locked iPhone.

A few weeks before, he discovered another passcode bypass vulnerability in Apple’s iOS version 12 that could have been exploited to access photos, contacts on a locked iPhone XS.

The researcher also disclosed a new passcode bypass flaw that could have been exploited to access photos and contacts on a locked iPhone XS.

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – iOS 13, passcode bypass)

The post Expert disclosed passcode bypass bug in iOS 13 a week before its release appeared first on Security Affairs.

What Is Safe Mode on My Phone?

Ever experienced buggy features on your phone? Well, there’s a way to solve them and it does not involve sending your phone packing to the nearest repair shop – it’s called the safe mode and, yes, it works just like Microsoft Windows’ repair and debugging environment. So, what is safe mode on my phone? Long story short, it could be your only shot at making that phone off your works again.

Screen freezes, unresponsive features, cascading restarts – all could be symptoms of a conflictive application. Unfortunately, uninstalling the application in question may not resolve the issue. Anyway, here’s how to switch on the safe mode on your phone.

What happens when your phone reboots in safe mode?

Basically, the safe mode is an environment where you debug faulty applications, turn off the feature that is otherwise hidden in normal mode. A Windows user knows best that in order to completely uninstall an app, you would need to go into safe mode. Well, that’s, more or less, what happens when you use this smartphone feature.

The environment is not at all different from your regular UI – all the apps are there, menus, connectivity options. However, while running in safe mode, you won’t be able to use widgets and some third-party applications; you won’t need them anyway since your goal here is to determine what went wrong with your phone. Well, that’s about it in safe mode. Yes, I know that it’s not a lot, but then again, you can’t get more straightforward than this.

Oh, by the way – most of the smartphone mishaps are generated by latent malware. On that note, I would wholeheartedly recommend using Thor Mobile Security, our latest malware-busting tool. Take it for a spin – first month’s on the house. If you don’t like it, you can always cancel your subscription and rely on your tool of choice.

Free Trial

How do you turn on the safe mode on your phone?

The quickest answer would be that it depends on what operating system your phone runs. Interestingly enough, the procedure’s the same across all iPhone devices, regardless of the OS. I’ll start with this one.

Turning on safe mode on your iPhone

Here’s a rundown on how to switch on the safe mode feature on your iPhone.

Step 1. Power down your phone by holding the power button.

Step 2. Wait until the phone’s completely powered off.

Step 3. Press and hold the power button again.

Step 4. When the screen lights up, hold down the Volume down button. Keep the two buttons pressed until the Apple logo appears on the screen.

Step 5. Your phone will now boot up in safe mode. Now you can safely remove any malfunctioning applications.

That was suspiciously easy, wasn’t it? Told you that the procedure’s the same when it comes to iPhones. Now that the fun part is over, let’s see how to switch on the safe mode on your Android device.

Turning on safe mode on Android

Let me start by showing you how to switch on this feature on most Samsung Galaxy phones.

Step 1. Drag down the notification bar.

Step 2. Tap on the “Safe mode enabled” button.

Step 3. Confirm and wait until your phone restarts. Congrats! Your phone is now operating in a safe mode.

Pitch-perfect! But that’s hardly the only way to switch on the celebrated safe mode. As I might have mentioned, the procedure depends on the type of phone you have. The list below will show you to unlock the feature on your Android phone.

Safe mode on HTC phones

If you have an HTC device, here’s how to switch on the safe mode.

Step 1. Press and hold the Power key. It should be located on the right side of your phone.

Step 2. Hold the Power key for about three seconds.

Step 3. From the power down menu that appears on the screen, tap and holds the Power off icon. After a couple of seconds, a new power down option will appear on your screen – “Reboot to safe mode”.

Step 4. Hit the Restart button. Your phone will now boot up in safe mode.

Safe mode on LG phones

To switch on the safe mode on your LG phone, start by holding the Power key and select the Restart option. Once the LG logo appears on the screen, hold down the Volume Down key. To see if safe mode is enabled, take a closer look at the bottom left corner of the screen. If you followed the above-mentioned steps, a Safe mode icon should appear.

Safe mode on Moto G phones

If you have a Motorola smartphone, please follow these steps in order to enable safe mode.

Step 1. Press and hold the Power key.

Step 2. Please release the power key when the Shut Down menu appears.

Step 3. Long-press the power off button.

Step 4. When the Reboot to Safe Mode option appears on your screen, tap on OK to initiate safe mode.

Safe mode on Huawei smartphones

It’s trickier to switch on the safe mode on Huawei phone since it involves removing the battery. Just follow the steps below.

Step 1. With the phone turned on, remove the back cover.

Step 2. Remove the battery.

Step 3. Put the battery back in the slot.

Step 4. Hold down the Menu.

Step 5. Long-press the Power Key. Don’t let go of that Menu key.

Step 6. If done correctly, the message “Safe Mode” should appear in the lower part of the screen.

Safe Mode on Blackberry PRIVs

Here’s a quick guide ton how to turn off the feature on your Blackberry PRIV phone.

Step 1. Long-press the Power button.

Step 2. When the Power Off menu appears on the screen, long-tap the Power Off button.

Step 3. After a couple of seconds, a safe mode prompt will appear on your screen.

Step 4. Tap OK to confirm.

Safe mode on Xiaomi smartphones

There are two ways to enable this feature on your Mi smartphone. Check out the guide below.

First method

Step 1. With the device powered on, long-press the power key.

Step 2. When the power menu appears, let go of the power key.

Step 3. Long-press the Power Off button.

Step 4. After a couple of seconds, the Android Safe Mode message will appear on your screen.

Step 5. Hit the Reboot button to restart the device into safe mode.

Second method

Step 1. Restart your device. You can do that by selecting the Restart option from the Power Off menu.

Step 2. When the Xiaomi logo appears on your screen, tap the Menu key.

Step 3. Continue tapping the menu key until you see the lock screen.

Step 4. The Android Safe Mode message should now be on your screen.

Safe mode on your Oppo smartphone

Oppo phones are the latest addition to the market. Can’t say I’ve had too much contact with them, but from what I’ve gathered, they’re cheap and surprisingly high-performing. So, here’s how to switch on the safe mode on your Oppo phone.

Step 1. Press and hold the Power key.

Step 2. In the Power Off menu, tap and hold the power off. Keep it pressed for a couple of seconds.

Step 3. A second power off menu till appear.

Step 4. Tap on OK to confirm booting into safe mode.

Wrap-up

Well, that’s about everything you need to know about the issue at hand (what is safe mode on my phone). As I’ve mentioned, sometimes it may be the only way to get rid of buggy applications and unresponsive features. And, if all else fails, there’s always the restore to factory settings feature. Hope you’ve enjoyed the read and, as always, for comments, rants, beer donations, shoot me a comment.

The post What Is Safe Mode on My Phone? appeared first on Heimdal Security Blog.

Hundreds of millions of Facebook users’ phone numbers found lying around on the internet

A security researcher found a server on the internet containing more than 419 million records related to Facebook users.

No password protection was in place – meaning the treasure trove of phone numbers was available to literally anybody with an internet connection.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Smashing Security #144: Google helps the FBI, Twitter Jack’s hijack, and car data woes

Should Google really be helping the FBI with a bank robbery? What’s the story behind the Twitter CEO claiming there’s a bomb in their offices? And how much does your car really know about you?

And we mourn the loss of Doctor Who legend Terrance Dicks…

Cybercrime’s Most Wanted: Four Mobile Threats that Might Surprise You

It’s hard to imagine a world without cellphones. Whether it be a smartphone or a flip phone, these devices have truly shaped the late 20th century and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. But while users have become accustomed to having almost everything they could ever want at fingertips length, cybercriminals were busy setting up shop. To trick unsuspecting users, cybercriminals have set up crafty mobile threats – some that users may not even be fully aware of. These sneaky cyberthreats include SMSishing, fake networks, malicious apps, and grayware, which have all grown in sophistication over time. This means users need to be equipped with the know-how to navigate the choppy waters that come with these smartphone-related cyberthreats. Let’s get started.

Watch out for SMSishing Hooks

If you use email, then you are probably familiar with what phishing is. And while phishing is commonly executed through email and malicious links, there is a form of phishing that specifically targets mobile devices called SMSishing. This growing threat allows cybercriminals to utilize messaging apps to send unsuspecting users a SMSishing message. These messages serve one purpose – to obtain personal information, such as logins and financial information. With that information, cybercriminals could impersonate the user to access banking records or steal their identity.

While this threat was once a rarity, it’s rise in popularity is two-fold. The first aspect being that users have been educated to distrust email messages and the second being the rise in mobile phone usage throughout the world. Although this threat shows no sign of slowing down, there are ways to avoid a cybercriminal’s SMSishing hooks. Get started with these tips:

  1. Always double-check the message’s source. If you receive a text from your bank or credit card company, call the organization directly to ensure the message is legit.
  2. Delete potential SMSishing Do not reply to or click on any links within a suspected malicious text, as that could lead to more SMSishing attempts bombarding your phone.
  3. Invest in comprehensive mobile security. Adding an extra level of security can not only help protect your device but can also notify you when a threat arises.

Public Wi-Fi Woes  

Public and free Wi-Fi is practically everywhere nowadays, with some destinations even having city-wide Wi-Fi set up. But that Wi-Fi users are connecting their mobile device to may not be the most secure, given cybercriminals can exploit weaknesses in these networks to intercept messages, login credentials, or other personal information. Beyond exploiting weaknesses, some cybercriminals take it a step further and create fake networks with generic names that trick unsuspecting users into connecting their devices. These networks are called “evil-twin” networks. For help in spotting these imposters, there are few tricks the savvy user can deploy to prevent an evil twin network from wreaking havoc on their mobile device:

  1. Look for password-protected networks. As strange as it sounds, if you purposely enter the incorrect password but are still allowed access, the network is most likely a fraud.
  2. Pay attention to page load times. If the network you are using is very slow, it is more likely a cybercriminal is using an unreliable mobile hotspot to connect your mobile device to the web.
  3. Use a virtual private network or VPN. While you’re on-the-go and using public Wi-Fi, add an extra layer of security in the event you accidentally connect to a malicious network. VPNs can encrypt your online activity and keep it away from prying eyes. 

Malicious Apps: Fake It till They Make It

Fake apps have become a rampant problem for Android and iPhone users alike. This is mainly in part due to malicious apps hiding in plain sight on legitimate sources, such as the Google Play Store and Apple’s App Store. After users download a faulty app, cybercriminals deploy malware that operates in the background of mobile devices which makes it difficult for users to realize anything is wrong. And while users think they’ve just downloaded another run-of-the-mill app, the malware is hard at work obtaining personal data.

In order to keep sensitive information out of the hands of cybercriminals, here are a few things users can look for when they need to determine whether an app is fact or fiction:

  1. Check for typos and poor grammar. Always check the app developer name, product title, and description for typos and grammatical errors. Often, malicious developers will spoof real developer IDs, even just by a single letter or number, to seem legitimate.
  2. Examine the download statistics. If you’re attempting to download a popular app, but it has a surprisingly low number of downloads, that is a good indicator that an app is most likely fake.
  3. Read the reviews. With malicious apps, user reviews are your friend. By reading a few, you can receive vital information that can help you determine whether the app is fake or not.

The Sly Operation of Grayware

With so many types of malware out in the world, it’s hard to keep track of them all. But there is one in particular that mobile device users need to be keenly aware of called grayware. As a coverall term for software or code that sits between normal and malicious, grayware comes in many forms, such as adware, spyware or madware. While adware and spyware can sometimes operate simultaneously on infected computers, madware — or adware on mobile devices — infiltrates smartphones by hiding within rogue apps. Once a mobile device is infected with madware from a malicious app, ads can infiltrate almost every aspect on a user’s phone. Madware isn’t just annoying; it also is a security and privacy risk, as some threats will try to obtain users’ data. To avoid the annoyance, as well as the cybersecurity risks of grayware, users can prepare their devices with these cautionary steps:

  1. Be sure to update your device. Grayware looks for vulnerabilities that can be exploited, so be sure to always keep your device’s software up-to-date.
  2. Beware of rogue apps. As mentioned in the previous section, fake apps are now a part of owning a smartphone. Use the tips in the above section to ensure you keep malicious apps off of your device that may contain grayware.
  3. Consider a comprehensive mobile security system. By adding an extra level of security, you can help protect your devices from threats, both old and new.

Can’t get enough mobile security tips and trends? Follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

The post Cybercrime’s Most Wanted: Four Mobile Threats that Might Surprise You appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Boost Your Bluetooth Security: 3 Tips to Prevent KNOB Attacks

Many of us use Bluetooth technology for its convenience and sharing capabilities. Whether you’re using wireless headphones or quickly Airdropping photos to your friend, Bluetooth has a variety of benefits that users take advantage of every day. But like many other technologies, Bluetooth isn’t immune to cyberattacks. According to Ars Technica, researchers have recently discovered a weakness in the Bluetooth wireless standard that could allow attackers to intercept device keystrokes, contact lists, and other sensitive data sent from billions of devices.

The Key Negotiation of Bluetooth attack, or “KNOB” for short, exploits this weakness by forcing two or more devices to choose an encryption key just a single byte in length before establishing a Bluetooth connection, allowing attackers within radio range to quickly crack the key and access users’ data. From there, hackers can use the cracked key to decrypt data passed between devices, including keystrokes from messages, address books uploaded from a smartphone to a car dashboard, and photos.

What makes KNOB so stealthy? For starters, the attack doesn’t require a hacker to have any previously shared secret material or to observe the pairing process of the targeted devices. Additionally, the exploit keeps itself hidden from Bluetooth apps and the operating systems they run on, making it very difficult to spot the attack.

While the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (the body that oversees the wireless standard) has not yet provided a fix, there are still several ways users can protect themselves from this threat. Follow these tips to help keep your Bluetooth-compatible devices secure:

  • Adjust your Bluetooth settings. To avoid this attack altogether, turn off Bluetooth in your device settings.
  • Beware of what you share. Make it a habit to not share sensitive, personal information over Bluetooth.
  • Turn on automatic updates. A handful of companies, including Microsoft, Apple, and Google, have released patches to mitigate this vulnerability. To ensure that you have the latest security patches for vulnerabilities such as this, turn on automatic updates in your device settings.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Boost Your Bluetooth Security: 3 Tips to Prevent KNOB Attacks appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

How to Build Your 5G Preparedness Toolkit

5G has been nearly a decade in the making but has really dominated the mobile conversation in the last year or so. This isn’t surprising considering the potential benefits this new type of network will provide to organizations and users alike. However, just like with any new technological advancement, there are a lot of questions being asked and uncertainties being raised around accessibility, as well as cybersecurity. The introduction of this next-generation network could bring more avenues for potential cyberthreats, potentially increasing the likelihood of denial-of-service, or DDoS, attacks due to the sheer number of connected devices. However, as valid as these concerns may be, we may be getting a bit ahead of ourselves here. While 5G has gone from an idea to a reality in a short amount of time for a handful of cities, these advancements haven’t happened without a series of setbacks and speedbumps.

In April 2019, Verizon was the first to launch a next-generation network, with other cellular carriers following closely behind. While a technological milestone in and of itself, some 5G networks are only available in select cities, even limited to just specific parts of the city. Beyond the not-so widespread availability of 5G, internet speeds of the network have performed at a multitude of levels depending on the cellular carrier. Even if users are located in a 5G-enabled area, if they are without a 5G-enabled phone they will not be able to access all the benefits the network provides. These three factors – user location, network limitation of certain wireless carriers, and availability of 5G-enabled smartphones – must align for users to take full advantage of this exciting innovation.

While there is still a lot of uncertainty surrounding the future of 5G, as well as what cyberthreats may emerge as a result of its rollout, there are a few things users can do to prepare for the transition. To get your cybersecurity priorities in order, take a look at our 5G preparedness toolkit to ensure you’re prepared when the nationwide roll-out happens:

  • Follow the news. Since the announcement of a 5G enabled network, stories surrounding the network’s development and updates have been at the forefront of the technology conversation. Be sure to read up on all the latest to ensure you are well-informed to make decisions about whether 5G is something you want to be a part of now or in the future.
  • Do your research. With new 5G-enabled smartphones about to hit the market, ensure you pick the right one for you, as well as one that aligns with your cybersecurity priorities. The right decision for you might be to keep your 4G-enabled phone while the kinks and vulnerabilities of 5G get worked out. Just be sure that you are fully informed before making the switch and that all of your devices are protected.
  • Be sure to update your IoT devices factory settings. 5G will enable more and more IoT products to come online, and most of these connected products aren’t necessarily designed to be “security first.” A device may be vulnerable as soon as the box is opened, and many cybercriminals know how to get into vulnerable IoT devices via default settings. By changing the factory settings, you can instantly upgrade your device’s security and ensure your home network is secure.
  • Add an extra layer of security.As mentioned, with 5G creating more avenues for potential cyberthreats, it is a good idea to invest in comprehensive mobile security to apply to all of your devices to stay secure while on-the-go or at home.

Interested in learning more about IoT and mobile security trends and information? Follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and ‘Like” us on Facebook.

The post How to Build Your 5G Preparedness Toolkit appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Be Wary of WhatsApp Messages Offering 1000GB of Free Data

Global messaging giant WhatsApp turned 10 years old this year. It’s not unusual for companies to provide loyal customers or members with gifts to show their appreciation during these milestones. Unfortunately, cybercriminals are using this as a ploy to carry out their malicious schemes. According to Forbes, security researchers have discovered a fraudulent message promising users 1000GB of free internet data, which is a scam bringing in ad click revenue for cybercriminals.

Let’s dive into the details of this suspicious message. The text reads “WhatsApp Offers 1000GB Free Internet!” and includes a link to click on for more details. However, the link provided doesn’t use an official WhatsApp domain. Many users might find this confusing since some businesses do run their promotions through third-party organizations. Forbes states that once a user clicks on the link, they are taken to a landing page that reads “We offer you 1000 GB free internet without Wi-Fi! On the occasion of our 10th anniversary of WhatsApp.” To make the user feel like they need to act fast, the landing page also displays a bright yellow countdown sticker warning that there are a limited number of awards left.

As of now, it doesn’t appear that the link spreads malware or scrapes users’ personal information. However, the scam could eventually evolve into a phishing tactic. Additionally, the more users click on the fraudulent link, the more the cybercriminals behind this scheme rack up bogus ad clicks. This ultimately brings in revenue for the cybercrooks, encouraging them to continue creating these types of scams. For example, the domain being used by the scammers behind the WhatsApp message also hosts other fake brand-led promotional offers for Adidas, Nestle, Rolex, and more.

So, what can users do to prevent falling for these phony ads? Check out the following tips to help you stay secure:

  • Avoid interacting with suspicious messages. Err on the side of caution and don’t respond to direct messages from a company that seems out of the ordinary. If you want to know if a company is participating in a promotional offer, it is best to go directly to their official site to get more information.
  • Be careful what you click on.If you receive a message in an unfamiliar language, one that contains typos, or one that makes claims that seem too good to be true, avoid clicking on any attached links.
  • Stay secure while you browse online. Security solutions like McAfee WebAdvisor can help safeguard you from malware and warn you of phishing attempts so you can connect with confidence.

And, of course, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Be Wary of WhatsApp Messages Offering 1000GB of Free Data appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Say So Long to Robocalls

For as long as you’ve had a phone, you’ve probably experienced in one form or another a robocall. These days it seems like they are only becoming more prevalent too. In fact, it was recently reported that robocall scams surged to 85 million globally, up 325% from 2017. While these scams vary by country, the most common type features the impersonation of legitimate organizations — like global tech companies, big banks, or the IRS — with the goal of acquiring user data and money. When a robocall hits, users need to be careful to ensure their personal information is protected.

It’s almost impossible not to feel anxious when receiving a robocall. Whether the calls are just annoying, or a cybercriminal uses the call to scam consumers out of cash or information, this scheme is a big headache for all. To combat robocalls, there has been an uptick in apps and government intervention dedicated to fighting this ever-present annoyance. Unfortunately, things don’t seem to be getting better — while some savvy users are successful at avoiding these schemes, there are still plenty of other vulnerable targets.

Falling into a cybercriminal’s robocall trap can happen for a few reasons. First off, many users don’t know that if they answer a robocall, they may trigger more as a result. That’s because, once a user answers, hackers know there is someone on the other end of the phone line and they have an incentive to keep calling. Cybercriminals also have the ability to spoof numbers, mimic voices, and provide “concrete” background information that makes them sound legitimate. Lastly, it might surprise you to learn that robocalls are actually perfectly legal. It starts to become a grey area, however, when calls come through from predatory callers who are operating on a not-so-legal basis.

While government agencies, like the Federal Communications Commission and Federal Trade Commission, do their part to curb robocalls, the fight to stop robocalls is far from over, and more can always be done. Here are some proactive ways you can say so long to pesky scammers calling your phone.

  1. There’s an app for that. Consider downloading the app Robokiller that will stop robocalls before you even pick up. The app’s block list is constantly updating, so you’re protected.
  2. Let unknown calls go to voicemail. Unless you recognize the number, don’t answer your phone.
  3. Never share personal details over the phone. Unfortunately, there’s a chance that cybercriminals may have previously obtained some of your personal information from other sources to bolster their scheme. However, do not provide any further personal or financial information over the phone, like SSNs or credit card information.
  4. Register for the FCC’s “Do Not Call” list. This can help keep you protected from cybercriminals and telemarketers alike by keeping your number off of their lists.
  5. Consider a comprehensive mobile security platform. Utilize the call blocker capability feature from McAfee Mobile Security. This tool can help reduce the number of calls that come through.

Interested in learning more about IoT and mobile security trends and information? Follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and ‘Like” us on Facebook.

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3 Tips for Protecting Against the New WhatsApp Bug

Messaging apps are a common form of digital communication these days, with Facebook’s WhatsApp being one of the most popular options out there. The communication platform boasts over 1.5 billion users – who now need to immediately update the app due to a new security threat. In fact, WhatsApp just announced a recently discovered security vulnerability that exposes both iOS and Android devices to malicious spyware.

So, how does this cyberthreat work, exactly? Leveraging the new WhatsApp bug, hackers first begin the scheme by calling an innocent user via the app. Regardless of whether the user picks up or not, the attacker can use that phone call to infect the device with malicious spyware. From there, crooks can potentially snoop around the user’s device, likely without the victim’s knowledge.

Fortunately, WhatsApp has already issued a patch that solves for the problem – which means users will fix the bug if they update their app immediately. But that doesn’t mean users shouldn’t still keep security top of mind now and in the future when it comes to messaging apps and the crucial data they contain. With that said, here are a few security steps to follow:

  • Flip on automatic updates. No matter the type of application or platform, it’s always crucial to keep your software up-to-date, as fixes for vulnerabilities are usually included in each new version. Turning on automatic updates will ensure that you are always equipped with the latest security patches.
  • Be selective about what information you share. When chatting with fellow users on WhatsApp and other messaging platforms, it’s important you’re always careful of sharing personal data. Never exchange financial information or crucial personal details over the app, as they can possibly be stolen in the chance your device does become compromised with spyware or other malware.
  • Protect your mobile phones from spyware. To help prevent your device from becoming compromised by malicious software, such as this WhatsApp spyware, be sure to add an extra layer of security to it by leveraging a mobile security solution. With McAfee Mobile Security being available for both iOS and Android, devices of all types will remain protected from cyberthreats.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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