Category Archives: Marriott

A week in security (December 3 – 9)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs, we gave readers an FYI on multiple breaches that affected Humble Bundle, Quora, and Dunkin’ Donuts, to name a few. This follows the announcement from Marriott about a four-year long breach that impacted half a billion of its patrons.

We also pushed out the report, “Under the Radar: The Future of Undetected Malware”, wherein we examined current threats and the technologies that are unprepared for them. You can download the report directly here.

Lastly, we discovered a new Mac malware, which has the combined the capabilities of the Empyre backdoor and the XMRig miner, and reported about a new Adobe Flash zero-day vulnerability that was used against a Russian facility in a targeted attack campaign.

Other cybersecurity news:

Stay safe!

The post A week in security (December 3 – 9) appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

Smashing Security #107: Sextorting the US army, and a Touch ID scam

Smashing Security #107: Sextorting the US army, and a Touch ID scam

Fitness apps exploit TouchID through a sneaky user interface trick, tech giants claim to have a plan to banish passwords, and you won’t believe who was behind a sextortion scam that targeted over 400 members of the US military.

All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by ferret-loving ethical hacker Zoë Rose.

Breaches, breaches everywhere, it must be the season

After last weeks shocker from Marriott this week started off with disclosures about breaches at Quora, Dunkin’ Donuts, and 1-800-Flowers.

Quora

Quora is an online community that focuses on asking and answering questions. It was founded in 2009 by two former Facebook employees.

The stolen data may concern up to 100 million users of the platform and included the username, the email address, and the encrypted password. In some cases, imported data from other social networks and private messages on the platform may have been taken as well.

To counter future abuse of the login credentials we would advise Quora users to change their password and make sure that the combination of credentials they used on Quora aren’t used elsewhere. Even though Quora used encryption and salted the passwords, it is not prudent to assume nobody will be able to decrypt them. For those that are in the habit of re-using passwords across different sites, please read: Why you don’t need 27 different passwords.

For those who no longer want to be registered at Quora, we also advise you to check under Settings and Disconnect any and all Connected Accounts.

Quora’s official statement can be checked for further details and updates.

Dunkin’ Donuts

A threat-actor successfully managed to gain access to Dunkin’ Donuts Perks accounts. The Perks accounts is a run-of-the-mill loyalty reward system. Dunkin’ Donuts claims that there was no breach into their systems but that re-used passwords were to blame.

we’ve been informed that third parties obtained usernames and passwords through other companies’ security breaches and used this information to log into some Dunkin’ DD Perks accounts.

As a countermeasure they forced password resets for all the customers the company believes were affected. If you are one of these customers the threat actors could have learned your first and last names, email addresses, 16-digit DD Perks account numbers, and DD Perks QR codes.

I repeat myself: For those that are in the habit of re-using passwords across different sites, please read: Why you don’t need 27 different passwords.

1-800-flowers

The Canadian online outpost of the floral and gourmet foods gift retailer reported an incident where a threat-actor may have gained access to customer data from 75,000 Canadian orders, including names and credit card information, over a four-year period. Even though the breach did not impact any customers on its U.S. website, 1-800-Flowers.com, the company has filed a notice with the attorney general’s office in California.

The stolen payment information seems to include credit card numbers and all the related information: names, expiration dates, and security codes. That’s really all any seasoned criminal needs to plunder your account.

Are you afraid to be a victim of this breach, here’s what you can do to prevent further damage:

  • Review your banking and credit card accounts for suspicious activity.
  • Consider a credit freeze if you’re concerned your financial information was compromised.
  • Watch out for breach-related scams; cybercriminals know this is a massive, newsworthy breach so they will pounce at the chance to ensnare users through social engineering

Or download our Data Breach Checklist here.

data breach epidemic

Is it the season?

Some of the recent breaches happened quite some time ago or have been ongoing for years, so why are they all telling us now?

Possible reasons:

  • New legislation requires companies to report breaches
  • Breaches happen all the time, but these happen to be some very serious or big ones, so the media talks about them
  • When a big breach is aired you will always see a few smaller ones, trying to hide in their shadow

If you’re a business looking for tips to prevent getting hit by a breach:

  • Invest in an endpoint protection product and data loss prevention program to make sure alerts on similar attacks get to your security staff as quickly as possible.
  • Take a hard look at your asset management program:
    • Do you have 100 percent accounting of all of your external facing assets?
    • Do you have uniform user profiles across your business for all use cases?
  • When it comes to lateral movement after an initial breach, you can’t catch what you can’t see. The first step to a better security posture is to know what you have to work with.

In a world where it seems breaches cannot be contained, consumers and businesses once again have to contend with the aftermath. Our advice to organizations: Don’t become a cautionary tale. Save your customers hassle and save your business’ reputation by taking proactive steps to secure your company today.

The post Breaches, breaches everywhere, it must be the season appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

Cyber Security Roundup for November 2018

One of the largest data breaches in history was announced by Marriott Hotels at the end of November. A hack was said to have compromised up to a mind-blowing "half a Billion" hotel guests' personal information over a four year period.  See my post, Marriott Hotels 4 Year Hack Impacts Half a Billion Guests for the full details. The Radisson Hotel Group also disclosed its Rewards programme suffer a data compromise. Radisson said hackers had gained access to a database holding member's name, address, email address, and in some cases, company name, phone number, and Radisson Rewards member number.

Vision Direct reported a website compromise, which impacted users of their website between 3rd and 8th November, some 16,300 people were said to be at risk  A fake Google Analytics script was placed within its website code by hackers. 

Eurostar customers were notified by email to reset their passwords following presumably successful automated login attempts to Eurostar accounts with stolen credentials obtained by an unknown method.

Two of the TalkTalk hackers were sentenced to a grand total of 20 months for their involvement in the infamous 2015 blackmail hack, which was said to have cost TalkTalk £77 million. There may have been up to 10 other attackers involved according to the court transcripts when hackers attempted to blackmail TalkTalk’s then CEO Dido Harding into paying a ransom in Bitcoin to cover up the breach. Has the enterprise, and judiciary, learned anything from TalkTalk hack?

Uber was fined £385,000 by the UK Information Commissioner's Office, after hackers stole 2.7 million UK customers in October and November 2016. Uber attempted to cover up the breach by paying the hackers $100,000 (£78,400) to destroy the stolen customer data. Meanwhile stateside,
 Uber paid $148m to settle federal charges. 

HSBC announced it had suffered a customer data breach in between 4th and 14th of October 2018 in a suspected "credential stuffing" attack. HSBC didn't state how many customers were impacted but are known to have 38 million customers worldwide. HSBC advised their customers to regularly change and use strong passwords and to monitor their accounts for unauthorised activity, sage good practice online banking advice, but I am sure their customers will want to know what has happened.

Facebook is still making the wrong kind of privacy headlines, this time it was reported that Facebook member's private message data was found for sale online, with one instance involving 257,256 stolen profiles and including 81,208 private messages. The report appears to suggest malicious browser extensions, not Facebook, may be behind the data breach.

A report from a UK parliamentary committee warned the UK government is failing to deliver on protecting the UK's critical national infrastructure (CNI) from cyber attacks. "The threat to critical infrastructure, including the power grid, is growing" the committee reported, with some states -"especially Russia" - starting to explore ways of disrupting CNI. An advisory notice also warned that UK companies connected to CNI were being targeted by cyber attackers believed to be in eastern Europe. APT28 (Russian based FancyBear) has added the "Cannon" Downloader Tool to their arsenal, according to researchers.

Amazon's showcase Black Friday sale was hit by data breach days before it started. The online retail giant said it emailed affected customers, but refused to provide any details on the extent or nature of the breach. The customer email said “Our website inadvertently disclosed your email address or name and email address due to a technical error. The issue has been fixed. This is not a result of anything you have done, and there is no need for you to change your password or take any other action.” 

There was a far more positive security announcement by Amazon about their AWS (cloud) services, with the launch of three new services to simplify and automate AWS security configuration called AWS Control Tower, AWS Security Hub, and AWS Lake Formation McAfee released their 2019 'Cloud Adoption and Risk Report' which highlights the vital importance of configuring cloud services correctly and securely.

RiskIQ claimed that monitoring for malicious code could have stopped the recent theft of 185,000 British Airways customer records. The Magecart hacker group is believed to be responsible for injecting twenty-two lines of malicious script into the British Airway's payment page, which successfully lifted debit and credit card details, including the CVV code.

Finally, according to enSilo, European Windows users are said to be targeted by a sophisticated malware called 'DarkGate', which has an arrange of nefarious capabilities, including cryptomining, credential stealing, ransomware, and remote-access takeovers. The DarkGate malware has been found to be distributed via Torrent files disguised as popular entertainment offerings, which includes Campeones and The Walking Dead, so be careful to avoid becoming infected!

NEWS

Marriott Data Breach Exposed 500 Million Records From Starwood Database

Another massive hotel data breach has surfaced online that affected millions of customers. This time, the victim is a renowned

Marriott Data Breach Exposed 500 Million Records From Starwood Database on Latest Hacking News.

Marriott breach impacts 500 million customers: here’s what to do about it

Today Marriott disclosed a large-scale data breach impacting up to 500 million customers who have stayed at a Starwood-branded hotel within the last four years. While details of the breach are still sparse, Marriott stated that there was unauthorized access to a database tied to customer reservations stretching from 2014 to September 10, 2018.

For a majority of impacted customers (approximately 327 million), the breached data includes some combination of name, mailing address, phone number, email address, passport number, Starwood Preferred Guest account information, date of birth, gender, arrival and departure information, reservation date, and communication preferences. For some of those guests, their credit card numbers and expiration dates were exposed, however, they were encrypted using the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES-128).

You can read more on impact to customers in Marriott’s statement here.

A root cause of the breach is currently unknown, but Marriott indicated that the intruders encrypted the information before exfiltrating the data. Brian Krebs reported that Starwood reported its own breach in 2015, shortly after acquisition by Marriott. At the time, Starwood said that their breach timeline extended back one year, to roughly November 2014. Incomplete remediation of breaches is extremely common, and when compounded by asset management challenges introduced by mergers and acquisitions, seeing lateral movement and exfiltration after an initial hack is not unreasonable.

Starwood properties impacted are as follows:

  • Westin
  • Sheraton
  • The Luxury Collection
  • Four Points by Sheraton
  • W Hotels
  • St. Regis
  • Le Méridien
  • Aloft
  • Element
  • Tribute Portfolio
  • Design Hotels

What should you do about it?

If you’re a customer:

  • Change your password for your Starwood Preferred Guest Rewards Program immediately. Random passwords generated by a password manager of your choice should be most helpful.
  • Review your banking and credit card accounts for suspicious activity.
  • Consider a credit freeze if you’re concerned your financial information was compromised.
  • Watch out for breach-related scams; cybercriminals know this is a massive, newsworthy breach so they will pounce at the chance to ensnare users through social engineering. Review emails supposedly from Marriott with an eagle eye.

Download our Data Breach Checklist here.

 

If you’re a business looking for tips to prevent getting hit by a breach:

  • Invest in an endpoint protection product and data loss prevention program to make sure alerts on similar attacks get to your security staff as quickly as possible.
  • Take a hard look at your asset management program:
    • Do you have 100 percent accounting of all of your external facing assets?
    • Do you have uniform user profiles across your business for all use cases?
  • When it comes to lateral movement after an initial breach, you can’t catch what you can’t see. The first step to a better security posture is to know what you have to work with.

In a world where it seems breaches cannot be contained, consumers and businesses once again have to contend with the aftermath. Our advice to organizations: Don’t become a cautionary tale. Save your customers hassle and save your business’ reputation by taking proactive steps to secure your company today.

The post Marriott breach impacts 500 million customers: here’s what to do about it appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

Marriott Hotels 4 Year Hack Impacts Half a Billion Guests!

A mammoth data breach was disclosed by hotel chain Marriott International today (30 Nov 18), with a massive 500 million customer records said to have been compromised by an "unauthorized party". 
Image result for marriott
The world's largest hotel group launched an internal investigation in response to a system security alert on 8th September 2018, and found an attacker had been accessing the hotel chain's "Starwood network" and customer personal data since 2014, copying and encrypting customer records. In addition to the Marriott brand, Starwood includes W Hotels, Sheraton, Le Méridien and Four Points by Sheraton. 

Image result for starwood
You are at risk if you have stayed at any of the above hotel brands in the last 4 years

The Marriott statement said for around 326 million of its guests, the personal information compromised included "some combination" of, name, address, phone number, email address, passport number, date of birth, gender and arrival & departure information. The hotelier also said encrypted payment card data was also copied, and it could not rule out the encryption keys to decrypt cardholder data had not been stolen.

The hotel giant said it would notify customers affected and offer some a fraud detecting service for a year for free, so I expect they will be making contact with myself soon. In the meantime, Marriott has launched a website for affected customers and a free helpline for concerned UK customers 0808 189 1065.

The UK ICO said it would be investigating the breach, and warned those who believe they are impacted to be extra vigilant and to follow the advice on the ICO website, and by the National Cyber Security Centre
. The hotel chain could face huge fines under the GDPR, and possibly a large scale class action lawsuit by their affected guests, which could cost them millions of pounds. 

What I really would like to know is why the hotel chain had retained such vast numbers of guest records post their stay. Why they held their customer's passport details and whether those encryption keys were stolen or not. And finally, why the unauthorised access went undetected for four years.

Tom Kellermann, Chief Cybersecurity Officer for Carbon Black, said "It appears there had been unauthorised access to the Starwood network since 2014, demonstrating that attackers will get into an enterprise and attempt to remain undetected. A recent Carbon Black threat report found that nearly 60% of attacks now involve lateral movement, which means attackers aren’t just going after one component of an organisation - they’re getting in, moving around and seeking more targets as they go."

The report also found that 50% of today’s attackers now use the victim primarily for island hopping. In these campaigns, attackers first target an organisation's affiliates, often smaller companies with immature security postures and this can often be the case during an M&A. This means that data at every point in the supply chain may be at risk, from customers, to partners and potential acquisitions.”

Jake Olcott, VP of Strategic Partnerships at BitSight, said "Following the breaking news today that Marriott’s Starwood bookings database has been comprised with half a billion people affected, it highlights the importance of organisations undertaking sufficient security posture checks to avoid such compromises. Marriott’s acquisition of Starwood in 2016 allowed it to utilise its Starwood customer database. Therefore, proactive due diligence during this acquisition period would have helped Marriott to identify the potential cybersecurity risks, and the impact of a potential breach".

“This is yet another example of why it is critical that companies perform cybersecurity analysts during the due diligence period, prior to an acquisition or investment. Traditionally, companies have approached cyber risk in acquisitions by issuing questionnaires to the target company; unfortunately, these methods are time consuming and reflect only a “snapshot in time” view.

“Understanding the cybersecurity posture of an investment is critical to assessing the value of the investment and considering reputational, financial, and legal harm that could befall the company. After an investment has been made, continuous monitoring is essential.”

IT Security Expert Blog: Marriott Hotels 4 Year Hack Impacts Half a Billion Guests!

A mammoth data breach was disclosed by hotel chain Marriott International today (30 Nov 18), with a massive 500 million customer records said to have been compromised by an "unauthorized party". 
Image result for marriott
The hotel giant said an internal investigation launched in response to a system security alert, found an attacker had been accessing the hotel chain's "Starwood network" since 2014, copying and encrypting customer records. In addition to the Marriott brand, Starwood includes W Hotels, Sheraton, Le Méridien and Four Points by Sheraton. 

The Marriott statement said for around 326 million of its guests, the personal information compromised included "some combination" of, name, address, phone number, email address, passport number, date of birth, gender and arrival & departure information. The hotelier also said encrypted payment card data was also copied, and it could not rule out the encryption keys to decrypt cardholder data had not been stolen.
Image result for starwood
Marriott said it would notify customers affected and offer some a fraud detecting service for a year for free, so I expect they will be making contact with myself soon. In the meantime, Marriott has launched a website for affected customers.

The UK ICO said it would be investigating the breach, and warned those who believe they are impacted, to be vigilant and to follow the advice by on the ICO website, and by the National Cyber Security Centre
. The hotel chain could help face huge fines under the GDPR, and possibly a large scale class action lawsuit by their affected guests, which could cost them millions of pounds. 

What I would like to know is why the hotel chain had retained such vast numbers of guest records post their stay, why they held their customer's passport details, whether those encryption keys were stolen. And why the unauthorised access went undetected for four years.

Tom Kellermann, Chief Cybersecurity Officer for Carbon Black, said "It appears there had been unauthorised access to the Starwood network since 2014, demonstrating that attackers will get into an enterprise and attempt to remain undetected. A recent Carbon Black threat report found that nearly 60% of attacks now involve lateral movement, which means attackers aren’t just going after one component of an organisation - they’re getting in, moving around and seeking more targets as they go."

The report also found that more than a third (36%) of today’s attackers now use the victim primarily for island hopping. In these campaigns, attackers first target an organisation's affiliates, often smaller companies with immature security postures and this can often be the case during an M&A. This means that data at every point in the supply chain may be at risk, from customers, to partners and potential acquisitions.”

Jake Olcott, VP of Strategic Partnerships at BitSight, said "Following the breaking news today that Marriott’s Starwood bookings database has been comprised with half a billion people affected, it highlights the importance of organisations undertaking sufficient security posture checks to avoid such compromises. Marriott’s acquisition of Starwood in 2016 allowed it to utilise its Starwood customer database. Therefore, proactive due diligence during this acquisition period would have helped Marriott to identify the potential cybersecurity risks, and the impact of a potential breach".

“This is yet another example of why it is critical that companies perform cybersecurity analysts during the due diligence period, prior to an acquisition or investment. Traditionally, companies have approached cyber risk in acquisitions by issuing questionnaires to the target company; unfortunately, these methods are time consuming and reflect only a “snapshot in time” view.

“Understanding the cybersecurity posture of an investment is critical to assessing the value of the investment and considering reputational, financial, and legal harm that could befall the company. After an investment has been made, continuous monitoring is essential.”


IT Security Expert Blog

Industry reactions to the enormous Marriott data breach

On September 8, 2018, Marriott received an alert from an internal security tool regarding an attempt to access the Starwood guest reservation database in the United States. Marriott engaged security experts to help determine what occurred. Marriott learned during the investigation that there had been unauthorized access to the Starwood network since 2014. The company recently discovered that an unauthorized party had copied and encrypted information, and took steps towards removing it. On November 19, … More

The post Industry reactions to the enormous Marriott data breach appeared first on Help Net Security.

Marriott Reveals Security Incident Involving Starwood Reservation Database

Marriott announced that it recently detected and addressed a security incident involving the Starwood guest reservation database. On 30 November, Marriott revealed that an internal investigation had found evidence of unauthorized access to the database containing guests’ reservation information at Sheraton hotels and other Starwood properties on or before 10 September 2018. The American multinational […]… Read More

The post Marriott Reveals Security Incident Involving Starwood Reservation Database appeared first on The State of Security.