Category Archives: #lifeatwebroot

A Chat with Kelvin Murray: Senior Threat Research Analyst

Reading Time: ~4 min.

In a constantly evolving cyber landscape, it’s no simple task to keep up with every new threat that could potentially harm customers. Webroot Senior Threat Research Analyst Kelvin Murray highlighted the volume of threats he and his peers are faced with in our latest conversation. From finding new threats to answering questions from the press, Kelvin has become a trusted voice in the cybersecurity industry.

What is your favorite part of working as a Senior Threat Research Analyst? 

My favorite part about being a threat researcher is both the thrill of learning about new threats and the satisfaction of knowing that our work directly protects our customers. 

What does a week as a Senior Threat Research Analyst look like? 

My week is all about looking at threat information. Combing through this information helps us find meaningful patterns to make informed analysis and predictions, and to initiate customer protections. It roughly breaks down into three categories. The first would be “top down” customer data like metadata. The data we glean from our customers is very important and a big part of what we do. The interlinking of all our data and the assistance of powerful machine learning is a great benefit to us.  

Next would be “whole file” information, or static file analysis and file testing. This is a slow process but there are times when the absolute certainty and granular detail that this kind of file analysis provides is essential. This isn’t usually part of my week, but I work with some great specialists in this regard.  

Last would be news and reports on the threat landscape in general. Risks anywhere are risks everywhere. Keeping up to date with the latest threats is a big part of what I do. I work with a variety of internal teams and try to advise stakeholders, and sometimes media, on current threats and how Webroot fits in. Twitter is a great tool for staying in the know, but without making a list to filter out the useful bits from the other stuff I follow, I wouldn’t get any work done! 

What skills have you built in this role? 

Customer support taught me a lot in terms of the client, company culture, and dealing with customer requests. By the time I was in business support I was learning the newer console system and more corporate terms. Training on the job was very useful for my move to threat, where I also picked up advanced malware removal (AMR), which is the most hands on you can get with malware and the pain it causes customers. All of that knowledge is now useful to me in my public facing role where I prepare webinars, presentations, interviews, blogs, and press answers about threats in general. 

What is your greatest accomplishment in your career at Webroot so far? 

Learning the no-hands trick on the scooter we have in the office. And of course my promotion to Senior Threat Research Analyst. I have had a lot of different roles in my time here, but I’m glad I went down the path I did in terms of employment. There’s never a dull moment when you are researching criminal news and trends, and surprises are always guaranteed. 

What brought you to Webroot? 

I like to say divine providence. But really I had been travelling around Asia for a few months prior to this job. When I got back home I was totally broke and needed a job. A headhunter called me up out of the blue, and the rest is history.   

Are you involved in anything at Webroot outside of your day to day work? 

Listening, singing and (badly) dancing to music. Dublin is a fantastic place for bands and artists to visit given its proximity to the UK and Europe and the general enthusiasm of concert goers. I do worry that a lot of venues, especially nightclubs, are getting shut down and turned into hotels though. I sing in a choir based out of Trinity College.  

Favorite memory on the job? 

Heading to (the now closed) Mabos social events with my team. The Mabos collective ran workshops and social and cultural events in a run-down warehouse that they lovingly (and voluntarily) converted down in Dublin’s docklands. Funnily enough, that building is now Airbnb’s European headquarters. 

What is your favorite thing about working at Webroot? 

The people that I get to work with. I have made many great friendships in the office and still see previous colleagues socially, even those from five or six years ago.  

What is the hardest thing about being a Senior Threat Research Analyst? 

Prioritizing my time. I can try my hand at a few different areas at work, but if I don’t focus enough on any one thing then nothing gets done. I find everything interesting and that curiosity can get in the way sometimes! 

What is your favorite thing to do in Dublin?  

Trying new restaurants and heading out to gigs. I’d be a millionaire if I didn’t eat out at lunchtime so much. Dublin is full of great places. I like all kinds of gigs from dance to soul to traditional. The Button Factory is one of the coolest venues we have. 

How did you get into the technology field? 

I first become interested in technology through messing with my aunt’s Mac back in the early 90s. There were a lot of cool games on her black and white laptop she brought home from a compucentre she worked in, but the one that sticks in my memory was Shufflepuck Café. My dad always had some crazy pre-Windows machines lying around. Things with cartridges or orange text screens running Norton commander. 

 To learn more about life at Webroot, visit https://www.webroot.com/blog/category/life-at-webroot/

The post A Chat with Kelvin Murray: Senior Threat Research Analyst appeared first on Webroot Blog.

Webroot Spotlight: Michael Balloni, Senior Manager of Software Development

Reading Time: ~3 min.

From recruiting top talent to daily technical leadership, a day-in-a-life of a software engineering is never boring. After chatting with Webroot Senior Manager of Software Development, Michael Balloni, it became even more obvious.  

Michael is working hard to build a robust and efficient team, and is undeniably enthusiastic about every stage of the process. The conversation only got more interesting as we dug into his role and responsibilities. 

What is your favorite part of working as a Senior Manager of Software Development?  

Hiring is my favorite part. Whether we’re sourcing talent on paper, on the phone, or in-person, it’s always fun to see how things evolve, right up to the offer and the day-one lunch. We use an agency called Accolo, and their excellent recruiter, Adam Robles. They have effective screener questions and a scoring system that helps us zero in on good candidates.  Given that score and a reasonable resume, we set up a phone call to discuss their claimed skillset. If that goes well, we bring them onsite and treat them like human beings. Finally, we put them to work on the whiteboard with problem solving. 

What does a week as a Senior Manager of Software Development look like? 

I interface with other teams to get big things up and running, like the collaborative Mac DNSP project. We marched through our code base to identify which modules would give us the most trouble and to put the porting process through its paces. We picked a module to port and worked through the process of creating the shared codebase and the mechanics thereof. Also, I promote technical leadership through mentoring and setting direction. 

So, what does promoting technical leadership look like? Do you have any criteria for promoting technical leadership? 

Technical leadership involves staying up-to-date on our industry and the technical craft, and sharing that information with the broader team. It also involves staying up-to-date on the development of the products at hand and steering that direction as needed. Most of the time there is no need to change direction, but sometimes there is, and it’s tough to identify. I’ve learned that getting clarification and input should happen before prescribing a fix to what may not be a problem at all. 

What is your greatest accomplishment in your career at Webroot so far? 

Promoting my colleague, Bindu Pillai, to software development manager. She’s my partner in crime, and has been indispensable with the latest round of, you guessed it, hiring! Promoting Bindu to a leadership position gave her delivery teams a capable leader. Bindu was what’s called a Product Owner, the technical and managerial lead of the delivery team. When her teams’ Agile Team Coordinator (who manages the digital resources like bug tracking and documentation, and make sure that developers have the tools they need and nothing blocking them) quit, Bindu took over the responsibility of the ATC. She did so without complaint or friction to the point where she took the loss of an ATC in stride. She delivers product on schedule, and keeps her direct reports productive and well-fed. 

What brought you to Webroot after your last job? 

I had fun working with Webroot’s CTO Hal Lonas in the 2000s at a previous company, so coming to work with him again was a no-brainer. 

How did you get into the technology field? 

I did hard math and physics in high school, which got me into Harvey Mudd College. That’s where I met my wife, and (only) did well at software development. So here we are. 

What is your favorite thing about working at Webroot? 

Everybody says it, but it’s the people.  All sharp and hardworking and friendly.  We’ve got a good thing here. 

Check out career opportunities at Webroot here: www.webroot.com/careers 

The post Webroot Spotlight: Michael Balloni, Senior Manager of Software Development appeared first on Webroot Blog.

Webroot Culture: Serena Peruzzi Shares Her Side

Reading Time: ~4 min.

Today we chat with Web Analyst Manager Serena Peruzzi. Serena constantly filters through the web to analyze content. Sometimes her position requires looking through difficult material, but other times you can find her traveling, organizing company events, and even gardening!  

See how Serena helps build Webroot’s company culture in this Employee Spotlight.

How did you get into the technology field? 

During my undergrad in Translation and Interpreting 10 years ago, I came to realize how big a role automation and machine translation were going to play in my field. Thus, I decided to beat the trend to the punch and focus my research on Google Translate for my thesis; further on, I completed a master’s degree in Translation Technology, which mixed together traditional translation with state-of-the art localization technologies, and included leveraging on Machine Learning and language pattern recognitions to build automated translation engines. Google Translate pretty much rules the multilingual content scene for the general public, making content in more than 100 languages immediately accessible to the global audience with just one click. Also, a lot of crowdsourced content, for example travel or business reviews on the web, is also localized using machine translation technologies to maximize international reach. Additionally, many large corporations already leverage on customized enterprise machine translation engines to translate manuals and other documentation. There are already technologies allowing to converse in multiple languages in real-time, so there’s virtually no language barriers than cannot be overcome anymore; of course, provided you have an internet connection 

What does a week as a Web Analyst Manager look like? 

I typically have a few one-on-one calls with all remote Web Analysts on a weekly or bi-weekly basis, and two team meetings per week, one with the US and one with Sydney. We discuss top issues, upcoming tool updates and feature releases, and use the wisdom of the crowd to find a solution to difficult cases. We use a collaborative Kanban board to track the topics we discuss, so that we can always go back to them or track progress on resolutions. Finally, I work on a number of projects related to training, quality assessments, classification approvals, new implementations, case escalations from the team, and documentation. I also have a few gardening tasks to take care of, keeping the Webroot Threat plants alive is quite an arduous task!  

What have you learned / what skills have you built in this role? 

Customer care, URL threat analysis, and all aspects of people management are among the key skills I learned in the role. It also helped me keep up my passion for foreign languages, especially Spanish and Japanese, since I need to analyze web content from all over the world. 

What is the hardest thing about being a Web Analyst Manager? 

Explaining what a Web Analyst does is quite an arduous task, partially because it is a very complex and multi-faceted role involving analyzing large amounts of online content, but also because it involves, to some extent, evaluating content that may be disturbing or violent in nature, and it can be a difficult sell at times. 

What is your greatest accomplishment in your career at Webroot so far? 

Having helped build a global team of brilliant and enthusiastic minds is perhaps what makes me most proud of being a part of Webroot. The Web Analysts are first and foremost masters of languages and cultures; collectively we speak 12 different languages. The more languages you know, the more confidence you have in analyzing online content from all over the world, bringing different perspectives to the mix. Also, we have another element in common: we all want to make the internet a little safer for our user base. Because of that, building the team has always been an incredibly fun experience. It allows candidates to bring up their unique backgrounds and passions for different cultures and the IT security world in their interviews. 

Does your work allow you to travel a lot? Where are some of the coolest places you have travelled?  

I’ve travelled to San Diego, Colorado and Sydney with Webroot. While I enjoyed all my trips, I do have a weak spot for Australia. I am a big fan of water sports, and Australia offers the best sceneries for surfing and diving. It also hosts some of the most amazing animals I’ve ever seen. I’ll admit that my encounter with a group of Huntsmen in Sydney, despite being harmless spiders, had me run away fast. But when I first met Quokkas (smiling furry animals), they literally melted my heart 

Best career advice you’ve received? 

There’s a saying in Ireland which can be used as an antidote when things don’t go your way, “What’s for you won’t pass you.” I felt particularly close to it when I couldn’t attain a role in the past, as it ultimately led me to a different, extremely satisfactory role surrounded by amazing people. 

Are you involved in anything at Webroot outside of your day to day work? 

Aside from gardening, I’ve given a hand with organizing team-building and social events for Dublin in the past, including Christmas parties, Health Day, mini-golf and bubble football tournaments, and escape room challenges. Since the team is spread across three offices, team events vary based on group size and local amenities. In Ireland, we typically go out for a nice meal once a month, and order in food for celebrations; additionally, there are regular pub sessions with other Webroot teams. We also have office-wide team building activities on a quarterly basis, and/or when we have visitors on-site.  

Favorite memory on the job? 

St Patrick’s Day in the office, when I was in Support, was also a truly fun day. On our lunch break we went to Temple Bar, the very core of St Patrick’s celebrations, hid amongst the mayhem of thousands of party-goers celebrating, and then pinged the US team to spot us on the live street camera, just like in a game of “Where’s Waldo.” 

To learn more about life at Webroot, visit https://www.webroot.com/blog/category/life-at-webroot/

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