Category Archives: ICO

How to verify and claim your CLBK token bonuses

Hello Cloudbric CLB community,

The following guide is meant to help you claim your additional CLBK bonuses that you acquired during our Super Holders Event.

Klaytn’s wallet app is expected to be released in late August/early September following the launch of Klaytn’s main net (opened June 27) and will be available to all users. The Klaytn Wallet allows you to check the balance of KLAY and KLAY compatible tokens like CLBK.

Thus, prior to the wallet’s release, Cloudbric will distribute CLBK through Cloudbric Labs, our online hub of free web security resources and tools for the cybersecurity community but in time for our upcoming token swap with Klaytn. 


Step 1: Sign up for membership on Cloudbric Labs using the same email you used to participate in the Super Holder Event

Check for your email here.
     

Step 2: Go to your dashboard and check the quantity of your CLBK tokens. 

Those who participated in the event using multiple wallet addresses but used the same email will be able to see their accumulated CLBK. 

Dashboard

Step 3: Following the release of Klaytn’s wallet, you will be able to enter a Klaytn’s wallet address into Cloudbric Labs’s withdrawal feature to claim your CLBK. 

More details about the token swap will soon be announced!


Make sure to follow us on our social media platforms (LinkedInTwitter, and Facebook) and our recently opened Telegram Announcement Channel for the latest updates!

The post How to verify and claim your CLBK token bonuses appeared first on Cloudbric.

UK Pub Chain ‘Greene King’ Gift Card Website Hacked

Major UK pub chain, Greene King (Bury St. Edmunds), had its gift card website (https://www.gkgiftcards.co.uk) compromised by hackers. The personal data breach was discovered on 14th May 2019 and confirmed a day later. The pub, restaurant and hotel chain informed their impacted customers by email today (28th May 2019).


Greene King said the hackers were able to access:
  • name
  • email address
  • user ID
  • encrypted password
  • address
  • post code
The pub chain did not disclose any further details on how passwords were "encrypted", only to say within their customer disclosure email "
Whilst your password was encrypted, it may still be compromised". It is a long established good industry coding practice for a website application's password storage to use a one-way 'salted' hash function, as opposed to storing customer plaintext passwords in an encrypted form.

No details were provided on how the hackers were able to compromise the gift card website, but there is a clue within Greene King's email statement, which suggests their website had security vulnerabilities which were fixable, "
we have taken action to prevent any further loss of personal information"

The number of customer records impacted by this data breach has also not disclosed. However, as this was a breach of personal information, Greene King was obligated under the DPA\GDPR to report the breach to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) as well as its impacted customers. Both Greene King and ICO are yet to release a press statement about this data breach.

This is not the first data breach reported by Greene King in recent times, in November 2016 2,000 staff bank details were accidentally leaked.

Greene King Personal Data Compromise Email to Customers
Dear Customer,
I am writing to inform you about a cyber-security breach affecting our website gkgiftcards.co.uk.

Suspicious activity was discovered on 14th May and a security breach was confirmed on 15th May. No bank details or payment information were accessed. However, the information you provided to us as part of your gift card registration was accessed. Specifically, the hackers were able to access your name, email address, user ID, encrypted password, address, post code and gift card order number. Whilst your password was encrypted, it may still be compromised. It is very important that you change your password on our website, and also any other websites where this password has been used.

When you next visit our website, using the following link (https://www.gkgiftcards.co.uk/user) you will be prompted to change your password. As a consequence of this incident, you may receive emails or telephone calls from people who have obtained your personal information illegally and who are attempting to obtain more personal information from you, especially financial information.

This type of fraud is known as 'phishing'. If you receive any suspicious emails, don't reply. Get in touch with the organisation claiming to have contacted you immediately, to check this claim. Do not reply to or click any links within a suspicious email and do not dial a suspicious telephone number given to you by someone who called you. Only use publicly listed contact details, such as those published on an organisation's website or in a public telephone directory, to contact the organisation to check this claim. At this stage of our investigation, we have no evidence to suggest anyone affected by this incident has been a victim of fraud but we are continuing to monitor the situation. We have reported the matter to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO).

As soon as we were made aware of the incident, our immediate priority was to close down any exposure, which has been done, and then confirm which customer accounts have been affected. I recognise that this is not the sort of message you want to receive from an organisation which you have provided your personal information to. I want to apologise for what has happened, and reassure you that we have taken action to prevent any further loss of personal information, and to limit any harm which might otherwise occur as a result of this incident.

Phil Thomas
Chief Commercial Officer of Greene King Plc.

Advice
  • Change your Greene King account password immediately, use a unique and strong password.
  • Ensure you have not used the same Greene King credentials (i.e. your email address with the same password) on any other website or app, especially with your email account, and with banking websites and apps. Consider using a password manager to assist you in creating and using unique strong passwords with every website and application you use.
  • Always use Multi-factor Authentication (MFA) when offered. MFA provides an additional level of account protection, which protects your account from unauthorised access should your password become compromised.
  • Check https://haveibeenpwned.com/ to see if your email and password combination is known to have been compromised in a past data breach.
  • Stay alert for customised messages from scammers, who may use your stolen personal information to attempt to con you, by email (phishing), letter and phone (voice & text). Sometimes criminals will pretend to represent the company breached, or another reputable organisation, using your stolen personal account information to convince you they are legit.
  • Never click on links, open attachments or reply to any suspicious emails.  Remember criminals can fake (spoof) their 'sender' email address and email content to replicate a ligament email.

Top Tips On Cyber Security for SMEs

Guest article by Damon Culbert of Cyber Security Jobs

Cyber criminals are a part of modern life, from Uber account hacks to major business data breaches, our online identities are rarely safe. And, while big-name companies under threat often make the news, it’s small and medium-sized enterprises who are actually their biggest targets.

Large businesses and government departments may seem like more obvious hacking targets with bigger payoffs, but these organisations can afford much more robust, well-kept and successful IT security measures and cyber security professionals working round the clock. Due to this, cyber criminals are much more likely to swing for easy targets like family businesses.

With the introduction of GDPR across Europe, all businesses are now much more responsible for the personal data they keep, meaning companies of all size can’t really afford to not have at least the basic security measures in place. The UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) have created a list of five principles as part of their Cyber Essentials Scheme. These include:

1. Secure your internet connection
2. Protect from viruses and other malware
3. Control access to your data and services
4. Secure your devices and software
5. Keep your devices and software up to date

All small businesses should know these principles and be putting them into practice, no matter how many staff they employ. In addition to this, here are a couple of other tips to keep hackers at bay which can be simply implemented into your business practices and keep the ICO (Information Commissioner’s Office) from the door.

Invest in Software and Hardware
While just functioning from day to day might be your only priority as a small business owner, investing in your technology will undoubtedly help in the long run. Keeping your software, such as virus software and operation systems, will ensure that any vulnerabilities identified by the creators are covered and there are no gaping holes in your cyber defences.

It might also be a good idea to invest in a good-quality back-up server and cyber insurance, so that if any personal data is every compromised, your operations can simply switch to the back-up server without affecting your business. Cyber insurance will also help keep you covered in case any clients’ personal data is lost and costs are incurred.

Staff Awareness Without the awareness of your staff, no manner of cyber security measures will keep your business safe. 90% of breaches happen because of user interaction, most commonly through phishing scams. Sophisticated phishers can impersonate senior members of staff in your organisation and trick other employees into handing over login details, authorising bogus payments or redirecting bank transfers.

Ensuring that staff are made aware of how to identify phishing scams and even having experienced trainers come in to guide them through cyber security best practice may seem like a cost you can spare but will go far in keeping the walls around your business impenetrable.

Compliance
The GDPR states that businesses who suffer a breach must alert the ICO and any customers who may have been affected within 72 hours of discovery. This is vital, and although fines could still be handed out for failure to prevent a breach, these fines will be much higher if the ICO discovers that you kept the information to yourself for longer than the 72 hour period.

The average time it takes for an organisation to discover a breach is 229 days, so the actual time it takes for the breach to come to your attention isn’t going to work too poorly in your favour. However, regular reporting is likely to result in earlier identification which will not only help you save time and money, but will also be a great trust signal to your clients that you take protecting their data seriously.

Pre-emptive planning
Security breaches are a ‘when’ not ‘if’ problem, so planning ahead is a necessity of modern business. 74% of SMEs don’t have any money saved to deal with an attack and 40% wouldn’t even know who to contact in the event of a breach. Having comprehensive disaster management plans in place will help keep you and your clients safe, keep your reputation in top shape and make sure you don’t have to pay out major money in the worst case scenario.

Plan of Action
The best thing for SMEs to do is to start small and keep building their defences as time goes on, helping keep costs down and customers happy. Here’s a plan of action to get started:

1. Start with the basics: follow the Cyber Essentials Scheme and bake these principles into your daily operations
2. Get an understanding of the risks to your business: check out the NCSC’s ’10 Steps to Cyber Security’ for further detail than the Cyber Essentials
3. Know your business: if you still feel your data isn’t safe, research more comprehensive frameworks like the IASME standard developed for small businesses
4. Once you have a complete security framework in place, develop on the NCSC’s advice with more sophisticated frameworks, such as the NIST framework for cybersecurity.

Learning from the Big Data Breaches of 2018

Guest article by Cybersecurity Professionals

What can we learn from the major data breaches of 2018?
2018 was a major year for cybersecurity. With the introduction of GDPR, the public’s awareness of their cyber identities has vastly increased – and the threat of vulnerability along with it. The Information Commissioner’s Office received an increased number of complaints this year and the news was filled with reports of multi-national and multi-millionaire businesses suffering dramatic breaches at the hand of cybercriminals.

2018 Data Breaches
Notable breaches last year include:

5. British Airways
The card details of 380,000 customers were left vulnerable after a hack affected bookings on BA’s website and app. The company insists that no customer’s card details have been used illegally but they are expected to suffer a major loss of money in revenue and fines as a result of the attack.

4. T-Mobile
Almost 2 million users had their personal data, including billing information and email addresses accessed through an API by an international group of hackers last August.

3. Timehop
A vulnerability in the app’s cloud computing account meant that the names and contact details of 21 million users were affected on Timehop. The company assured users that memories were only shared on the day and deleted after, meaning that the hackers were not able to access their Facebook and Twitter history.

2. Facebook & Cambridge Analytica
One of the most sensationalised news stories of the last year, Facebook suffered a string of scandals after it was released that analytics firm Cambridge Analytica had used the Facebook profile data of 87 million users in an attempt to influence President Trump’s campaign and potentially aid the Vote Leave campaign in the UK-EU referendum.

1. Quora
After a “malicious third party” accessed Quora’s system, the account information, including passwords, names and email addresses, of 100 million users was compromised. The breach was discovered in November 2018.

GDPR
As the UK made the switch from the Data Protection Act to GDPR, businesses and internet users across the country suddenly became more aware of their internet identities and their rights pertaining to how businesses handled their information.

With the responsibility now firmly on the business to protect the data of UK citizens, companies are expected to keep a much higher standard of security in order to protect all personal data of their clients.

How many complaints to the ICO?
Elizabeth Denham, the UK’s Information Commissioner, said that the year 2017-18 was ‘one of increasing activity and challenging actions, some unexpected, for the office’.

This is shown in an increase in data protection complaints by 15%, as well as an increase in self-reported breaches by 30%. Since this is the first year of GDPR, it is expected that self-reported breaches have increased as businesses work to insure themselves against much higher fines for putting off their announcement.

The ICO also reports 19 criminal prosecutions and 18 convictions last year and fines totalling £1.29 million for serious security failures under the Data Protection Act 1998. The office has assured that they don’t intend to make an example of firms reporting data breaches in the early period of GDPR but as time goes on, leniency is likely to fade as businesses settle into the higher standards.

What does it mean for SMEs?
With 36% of SMEs having no cybersecurity plan, the general consensus is that they make for unpopular targets. However, with the GDPR, the responsibility is on the business to protect their data so being vulnerable could result in business-destroying costs. Considering the cost to businesses could total the higher of 2% of annual turnover or €10 million, data protection is of paramount importance to small businesses.

How exposed are we in the UK?
At 31%, our vulnerability rating is higher than the Netherlands, Germany, Estonia (30%) and Finland (29%), but the UK is a more likely target for cybercriminals looking to exploit high tech and financial services industries, which are some of the most vulnerable across Great Britain.

Despite a higher level of vulnerability, the UK has one of the largest cyber security talent pools, showing there is time and manpower being dedicated to the protection of our data online.

https://www.cybersecurity-professionals.com/blog/2019/03/01/cybercrime-in-the-uk-infographic/