Category Archives: Huawei

Dutch intelligence investigate alleged Huawei ‘backdoor’

Dutch intelligence services are probing Huawei for possibly spying for the Chinese government by using a “back door” in equipment of major telecoms firms.

Dutch intelligence probes Huawei for possibly spying for the Chinese government by using a “back door” in the equipment used by major telecoms firms.

Dutch intelligence shares the concerns raised by other western governments about the risks of involving the Chinese telco giant in the creation of the new 5G mobile phone infrastructure.

Since 2018, US Government has invitedd its allies to exclude Huawei equipment from critical infrastructure and 5G architectures.

According to Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant, the probe into Huawei is being led by the Dutch intelligence agency, AIVD.

The newspaper, citing intelligence sources, revealed that Huawei had alleged access to the data of customers of major telecoms firms in the country, including Vodafone, KPN and T-Mobile. In April, KPN announced a partnership with Huawei to update its 4G networks.

“The report comes at a crucial time in the Netherlands, with Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte expected to make an imminent decision on the extent of Huawei’s involvement in the country’s 5G infrastructure.” reported the Telegraph.

AIVD did not comment the report, its spokesman Hilbert Bredemeijer explained that the spy agency “does not comment on possible individual cases.”

Huawei Dutch intelligence

Huawei continues to refuse the accusation of cyber espionage, it also remarked that it is a private company not working for the Chinese intelligence apparatus.

“We do not respond to stories based on anonymous sources or speculation. We have been aware of a Task Force led by the NCTV (Ministry of Justice & Security) for some time to investigate the risks involved in the construction and use of 5G. That was previously announced in a letter from Minister Grapperhaus.” a Huawei spokesperson said.

“It is also known that the three major telecom parties are participating in the risk analysis of the vulnerability of 5G telecommunication networks. This involves looking at what measures are needed to minimize risks. We are in favor of taking general measures that can increase the resilience of telecommunications networks and that apply equally to all relevant parties. We look forward to the results of this report with confidence.”

The Dutch probe is part of a dispute between China and the United States over global trade and cyber espionage.

If you appreciate my effort in spreading cybersecurity awareness, please vote for Security Affairs in the section “Your Vote for the Best EU Security Tweeter”

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(SecurityAffairs – 5G, Dutch intelligence services)

The post Dutch intelligence investigate alleged Huawei ‘backdoor’ appeared first on Security Affairs.

This Week in Security News: BEC Attacks and Botnet Malware

Welcome to our weekly roundup, where we share what you need to know about the cybersecurity news and events that happened over the past few days. This week, learn about the prevalence and impact of BEC attacks. Also, find out how botnet malware can perform remote code execution, DDoS attacks and cryptocurrency mining.

Read on:

Tech Support Scam Employs New Trick by Using Iframe to Freeze Browsers

Trend Micro discovered a new technical support scam (TSS) campaign that makes use of iframe in combination with basic pop-up authentication to freeze a user’s browser. 

Cybersecurity Pros Could Work for Multiple Agencies Under Bill Passed by Senate

Skilled federal cybersecurity workers could be rotated among civilian agencies under bipartisan legislation the Senate passed to help fill specific gaps in the workforce. 

New Cybersecurity Report Warns CIOs — ‘If You’re Breached Or Hacked, It’s Your Own Fault’

A new cybersecurity survey conducted by endpoint management specialists 1E and technology market researchers Vanson Bourne, a survey that questioned 600 IT operations and IT security decision-makers across the U.S. and U.K., and found that 60% of the organizations had been breached in the last two years and 31% had been breached more than once.

AESDDoS Botnet Malware Exploits CVE-2019-3396 to Perform Remote Code Execution, DDoS Attacks, and Cryptocurrency Mining

Trend Micro’s honeypot sensors detected an AESDDoS botnet malware variant exploiting a server-side template injection vulnerability in a collaboration software program used by DevOps professionals. 

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May Fires Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson Over Huawei Leak

British Prime Minister Theresa May fired Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson, saying he leaked sensitive information surrounding a review into the use of equipment from China’s Huawei Technologies Co. in the U.K.’s telecoms network. 

This Hacker Is Selling Dangerous Windows 0-Day Hacks For Past 3 Years

report by ZDNet has revealed that a mysterious hacker is selling Windows zero-day exploits to the world’s most notorious cybercrime groups for the past three years. At least three cyber-espionage groups also known as Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) are regular customers of this hacker.

Docker Hub Repository Suffers Data Breach, 190,000 Users Potentially Affected

In an email sent to their customers on April 26, Docker reported that the online repository of their popular container platform suffered a data breach that affected 190,000 users. 

IC3: BEC Cost Organizations US$1.2 Billion in 2018

In the recently published 2018 Internet Crime Report by the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), the agency states that in 2018 alone, it received 20,373 BEC/email account compromise (EAC) complaints that racked up a total of over US$1.2 billion in adjusted losses. 

Trend Forward Capital’s First Startup Pitch Competition in Dallas

Trend Forward Capital, in a partnership with Veem, is bringing its Forward Thinker Award and pitch competition to Dallas on May 20. 

BEC Scammers Steal US$1.75 Million From an Ohio Church

The Saint Ambrose Catholic Parish in Brunswick, Ohio was the victim of a BEC attack when cybercriminals gained access to employee email accounts and used them to trick other members of the organization into wiring the payments into a fraudulent bank account. 

Cybersecurity Experts Share Tips And Insights For World Password Day

May 2 is World Password Day. World Password Day falls on the first Thursday in May each year and is intended to raise awareness of password best practices and the need for strong passwords. 

Confluence Vulnerability Opens Door to GandCrab

A vulnerability in a popular devops tool could leave companies with a dose of ransomware to go with their organizational agility, according to researchers at Trend Micro and Alert Logic.

Were you surprised by the amount of business email compromise complaints the FBI received in 2018? Share your thoughts in the comments below or follow me on Twitter to continue the conversation: @JonLClay.

The post This Week in Security News: BEC Attacks and Botnet Malware appeared first on .

Fallout from Gavin Williamson sacking | Letters

Readers respond to the sacking of the defence secretary Gavin Williamson over accusations of leaking

While I am delighted that Gavin Williamson (May tells defence secretary: ‘You leaked, you are fired’, 2 May) has been removed from the government – remember he said that all British jihadists should be hunted down and killed in the Middle East rather than returned for trial here – I am sorry that as a result Rory Stewart no longer has responsibility for prisons. His is a deserved promotion, but as prisons minister he was the first member of the government to make any attempt to get to grips with the problems of our criminal justice system and offered to resign if things did not improve. How sad that there are not more of that ilk in public life these days.
Maureen Panton
Malvern, Worcestershire

• Is the Gavin Williamson who has just been sacked as defence secretary for allegedly leaking plans discussed in the National Security Council to allow Huawei to be involved in building the UK’s 5G network the same Gavin Williamson who told us last year that it’s Jeremy Corbyn that “cannot be trusted”?
Sasha Simic
London

Continue reading...

Cyber Security Roundup for April 2019

The UK government controversially gave a green light to Huawei get involved with the building of the UK's 5G networks, although the Chinese tech giant role will be limited to non-sensitive areas of the network, such as providing antennas. This decision made by Theresa May came days after US intelligence announced Huawei was Chinese state funded, and amidst reports historical backdoors in Huawei products, stoking up the Huawei political and security row even further this month, and has resulted in the UK Defence Secretary, Gavin Williamson, being sacked. 
The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) launched a free online tool called "Exercise in a Box", designed by the UK cyber intelligence boffins to help organisations prepare in managing major cyber attacks.  The premise, is the tool will help UK organisations avoid scenarios such as the 2017’s Wannacry attacks, which devastated NHS IT systems and placed patient lives at risk.
 
German drug manufacturing giant, Beyer, found a malware infection, said to originate from a Chinese group called "Wicked Panda".  The malware in question was WINNIT, which is known in the security industry and allows remote access into networks, allowing hackers to deliver further malware and to conduct exploits. In my view, the presence of WINNIT is a sure sign a covert and sustained campaign by a sophisticated threat actor, likely focused on espionage given the company's sector.  Beyer stressed there was no evidence of data theft, but were are still investigating. 
 
Another manufacturing giant severely hit by a cyber attack this month was Aebi Schmidt. A ransomware outbreak impacted its business' operations globally, with most of the damage occurring at their European base. The ransomware wasn't named, but it left multiple Windows systems, on their presumably flat network infrastructure, paralyzed.
 
Facebook may have announced the dawn of their "privacy evolution" at the end of April, but their privacy woes still continue, after Upguard researchers found and reported 540 Million Facebook member records on an unsecured AWS S3 bucket. The "Cultura Colectiva" dataset contained 146GB of data with 540 million records showing comments, likes, reactions, account names, Facebook IDs and more. Looks like Facebook really have their work cut in restoring their consumer's faith in protecting their privacy.
 
UK businesses saw a significant increase in cyber attacks in 2019 according to a report by insurer Hiscox, with 55% of respondents reporting they had faced a cyber attack in 2019, up from 40% from last year.
 
A survey by the NCSC concluded most UK users are still using weak passwords. Released just before CyberUK 2019 conference in Glasgow, which I was unable attend due work commitments, said the most common password on breached accounts was"123456", used by 23.2 million accounts worldwide. Next on the list was "123456789" and "qwerty", "password" and "1111111".  Liverpool was the most common Premier League Football team used as a password, with Blink 182 the most common music act. The NCSC also published a separate analysis of the 100,000 most commonly re-occurring passwords that have been accessed by third parties in global cyber breaches. So password still remains the biggest Achilles' heel with our security.

The UK hacktivist threat came back to the fore this month, after the Anonymous Group took revenge on the UK government for arresting WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, by attacking Yorkshire Councils. I am not sure what Yorkshire link with Assange actually is, but the website for Barnsley Council was taken down by a DDoS attack, a tweet from the group CyberGhost404 linked to the crashed Barnsley Council website and said "Free Assange or chaos is coming for you!". A tweet from an account called 'Anonymous Espana' with an image, suggested they had access to Bedale Council's confidential files, and were threatening to leak them. 
 
Microsoft Outlook.com, Hotmail and MSN users are reported as having their accounts compromised. TechCrunch revealed the breach was caused due to the hackers getting hold of a customer support tech's login credentials. Over two million WiFi passwords were found exposed on an open database by the developer of WiFi Finder. The WiFi Finder App helps to find and log into hotspots.  Two in every three hotel websites leak guest booking details and personal data according to a report. Over 1,500 hotels in 54 countries failed to protect user information.
 
Finally, but not lest, a great report by Recorded Future on the raise of the dark web business of credential stuffing, titled "The Economy of Credential Stuffing Attacks". The report explains how low-level criminals use automated 'checkers' tools to validate compromised credentials, before selling them on.

I am aware of school children getting sucked into this illicit world, typically starts with them seeking to take over better online game accounts after their own account is compromised, they quickly end up with more money than they can spend. Aside from keeping an eye on what your children are up to online as a parent, it goes to underline the importance of using unique complex passwords with every web account (use a password manager or vault to help you - see password security section on the Security Expert website). And always use Multi-Factor Authentication where available, and if you suspect or have are informed your account 'may' have compromised, change your password straight away.

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French Government App Shows Difficulties with Secure Communications

A messaging app released by the French government to secure internal communications has gotten off to a troubled start.

Tchap was released in beta earlier this month as a secure messaging app exclusively for government officials. Its development and release was made to address security concerns and data vulnerabilities in more widely used apps including WhatsApp and Telegram (a favorite of French Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron).

WhatsApp Meet “What Were You Thinking?”

Tchap was built with security in mind, and was initially touted as being “more secure than Telegram.” Man plans and God laughs. The app was hacked within less than a day of its release. Elliot Alderson, the hacker who discovered the initial security vulnerability, subsequently found four more major flaws in its code, and confirmed with the app’s developer that no security audit was performed on the app prior to release.

DINSIC, the government agency responsible for Tchap, issued a press release stating that the software “will be subject to continuous improvement, both in terms of usability and security,” and has since announced a bug bounty for further vulnerabilities.

The French government’s attempts at creating a secure messaging alternative highlights a cybersecurity conundrum. Recent incidents including the allegations of Chinese government “backdoors” in telecom giant Huawei’s hardware and confirmed NSA backdoors in Windows software have left governments and businesses increasingly wary of using software or hardware developed or data stored internationally. At the same time, development of in-house or “proprietary” solutions are significantly more resource-intensive and not necessarily more secure than their more widely used counterparts.

 

The post French Government App Shows Difficulties with Secure Communications appeared first on Adam Levin.

Cyber Security Roundup for March 2019

The potential threat posed by Huawei to the UK national infrastructure continues to be played out. GCHQ called for a ban on Huawei technology within UK critical networks, such as 5G networks, while Three said a Huawei ban would delay the UK 5G rollout, and the EU ignored the US calls to ban Huawei in 5G rollouts, while promoting the EU Cybersecurity certification scheme to counter the Chinese IT threat, which is all rather confusing.  Meanwhile, Microsoft Researchers found an NSA-style Backdoor in Huawei Laptops, which was reported to Huawei by Microsoft, leading to the flaw being patched in January 2019.
A serious security flaw placed Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) customers at risk. The vulnerability was discovered by PenTest Partners in the bank provided 'Heimdal Thor', security software, which was meant to protect NatWest customers from cyber-attacks but actually permitted remote injection commands at the customer's endpoint. PenTest Partners said "We were able to gain access to a victim's computer very easily. Attackers could have had complete control of that person's emails, internet history and bank details. To do this we had to intercept the user's internet traffic but that is quite simple to do when you consider the unsecured public wi-fi out there, and it's often all too easy to compromise home wi-fi setups.
 
Facebook made negative security headlines yet against after they disclosed that 20,000 of their employees had access to hundreds of millions of their user account passwords for years.

One of the world’s biggest aluminium producers, 
Norsk Hydrosuffered production outages after a ransomware outbreak impacted its European and US operations.  Damages from ransomware attack on Norsk Hydro reach as high as $40M.

Citrix disclosed a security breach of its internal network may have compromised 6Tb of sensitive data. The FBI had told Citrix that international cyber criminals had likely gained access to its internal network. Citrix said in a statement it had taken action to contain the breach, “We commenced a forensic investigation; engaged a leading cyber security firm to assist; took actions to secure our internal network; and continue to cooperate with the FBI”.  According to security firm Resecurity, the attacks were perpetrated by Iranian-linked group known as IRIDIUM.

Credit monitoring Equifax admitted in a report it didn't follow its own patching schedule, neglecting to patch Apache Struts which led to a major 2017 breach which impacted 145 million people.  The report also said Equifax delayed alerting their customers for 6 weeks after detecting the breach.

ASUS computers had backdoors added through its software update system, in an attack coined “ShadowHammer”. Kaspersky researchers estimated malware was distributed to nearly a million people, although the cybercriminals appeared to have only targeted 600 specific devices. Asus patched the vulnerability but questions still remain.


The top 10 biggest breaches of 2018 according to 4iQ were:
  1. Anti-Public Combo Collections – (Hacked) Sanixer Collection #1-6, 1.8 billion unique email addresses.
  2. Aadhaar, India – (Open third party device) 1.1 billion people affected
  3. Marriott Starwood Hotels – (Hacked) 500 million guests PII
  4. Exactis – (Open device) 340 million people and businesses.
  5. HuaZhu Group – (Accidental Exposure) 240 million records
  6. Apollo – (Open device) 150 million app users.
  7. Quora – (Hacked) 100 million users.
  8. Google+ – (API Glitch) 52.2 million users.
  9. Chegg – (Hacked) 40 million accounts 
  10. Cathay Pacific Airways (Targeted attack) 9.4 million passengers.
Barracuda Networks reported the top 12 phishing email subject lines, after they analysed 360,000 phishing emails over a three-month period.
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Cyber Security Roundup for February 2019

The perceived threat posed by Huawei to the UK national infrastructure continued to make the headlines throughout February, as politicians, UK government agencies and the Chinese telecoms giant continued to play out their rather public spat in the media. See my post Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security? for further details. And also, why DDoS might be the greater threat to 5G than Huawei supplied network devices.

February was a rather quiet month for hacks and data breaches in the UK, Mumsnet reported a minor data breach following a botched upgrade, and that was about it. The month was a busy one for security updates, with Microsoft, Adobe and Cisco all releasing high numbers of patches to fix various security vulnerabilities, including several released outside of their scheduled monthly patch release cycles.

A survey by PCI Pal concluded the consequences of a data breach had a greater impact in the UK than the United States, in that UK customers were more likely to abandon a company when let down by a data breach. The business reputational impact should always be taken into consideration when risk assessing security.


Another survey of interest was conducted by Nominet, who polled 408 Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) at midsize and large organisations in the UK and the United States. A whopping 91% of the respondents admitted to experiencing high to moderate levels of stress, with 26% saying the stress had led to mental and physical health issues, and 17% said they had turned to alcohol. The contributing factors for this stress were job security, inadequate budget and resources, and a lack of support from the board and senior management. A CISO role can certainly can be a poisoned-chalice, so its really no surprise most CISOs don't stay put for long.

A Netscout Threat Landscape Report declared in the second half of 2018, cyber attacks against IoT devices and DDoS attacks had both rose dramatically. Fuelled by the compromise of high numbers of IoT devices, the number of DDoS attacks in the 100GBps to 200GBps range increased 169%, while those in the 200GBps to 300GBps range exploded 2,500%. The report concluded cybercriminals had built and used cheaper, easier-to-deploy and more persistent malware, and cyber gangs had implemented this higher level of efficiency by adopting the same principles used by legitimate businesses. These improvements has helped malicious actors greatly increase the number of medium-size DDoS attacks while infiltrating IoT devices even quicker.

In a rare speech, Jeremy Fleming, the head of GCHQ warned the internet could deteriorate into "an even less governed space" if the international community doesn't come together to establish a common set of principles. He said "China, Iran, Russia and North Korea" had broken international law through cyber attacks, and made the case for when "offensive cyber activities" were good, saying "their use must always meet the three tests of legality, necessity and proportionality. Their use, in particular to cause disruption or damage - must be in extremis".  Clearly international law wasn't developed with cyber space in mind, so it looks like GCGQ are attempting to raise awareness to remedy that.

I will be speaking at the e-crime Cyber Security Congress in London on 6th March 2019, on cloud security, new business metrics, future risks and priorities for 2019 and beyond.

Finally, completely out of the blue, I was informed by 4D that this blog had been picked by a team of their technical engineers and Directors as one of the best Cyber Security Blogs in the UK. The 6 Best Cyber Security Blogs - A Data Centre's Perspective Truly humbled and in great company to be on that list.

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    What’s the greater risk to UK 5G, Huawei backdoors or DDoS?

    Have we been focusing too much on the Huawei backdoor threat instead of the DDoS threat facing the incoming 5G network infrastructure? Lee Chen, CEO at A10 networks thinks so.

    The size and sophistication of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have risen at an ever-accelerating pace. As new 5G networks become operational, we expect the size of attacks will dwarf these records. This is primarily due to the increase in IoT devices that 5G will introduce, with the number set to reach 4.1 billion globally by 2024. Each device is a perfect nest for botnets carrying malware, offering a new DDoS weapon for hackers to take advantage of.

    Service providers will need to evolve rapidly with these growing threats and adopt intelligent automation to detect and mitigate security anomalies in a matter of seconds. Sophisticated DDoS threat intelligence, combined with real-time threat detection and automated signature extraction, will allow the marketplace to defend against even the most massive multi-vector DDoS attacks, no matter where they originate.


    The Huawei threat remains a political football, there is still uncertainty on whether the Chinese telecoms giant's network devices will be banned in the UK or not. I have updated my post - Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security? with the latest developments.

    Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security?

    On 19th July 2018 the UK government, through the GCHQ backed Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, gave “limited assurance” that Huawei poses no threat to UK National Security. Since then the UK, EU, and NATO member government politicians and security services have all raised concerns about the nation-state cyber threat posed by the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei. 

    There has been particular political unease around the Huawei provision of network infrastructure devices (i.e. switches and routers etc.) within the UK national infrastructure, devices which controls network traffic and capable of accessing the data that traverses them. Huawei has been operating in the UK market for 18 years, whether its their smart phones or a network devices, Huawei products are generally far cheaper than their competitors' equivalents. This has led to major telecoms providers such as BT, purchasing and implementing Huawei network devices within their telecommunications infrastructure and data centres, some of which are regarded as critical components within the UK national infrastructure. As such, Huawei has been subject to unfavourable security scrutiny, which has recently spilt out into political and media arenas. 


    Huawei has always denied its products poses a threat, and there is no evidence of any malicious capability or activity publicly disclosure by any UK intelligence agencies or cyber security firms. But there is also the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, which states that Chinese organisations are obliged to "support, cooperate with, and collaborate in, national intelligence work".

    Three nations in the intelligence alliance ‘Five Eyes’, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have effectively prohibited the installation of Huawei equipment within their generation telecommunications equipment, namely 5G networks. The remaining two members of "Five Eyes", the United Kingdom and Canada, are expected to state their position within the coming months. The UK's National Cyber Security Centre has published warnings about the Chinese company's security standards. Elsewhere, nations including France, Germany and India have expressed their concerns about the use of Huawei equipment within their telecommunications 5G upgrades.


    On 4th February, a leaked draft 'Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre' 2019 report, said the issues and findings it had raised previously had not been fully addressed by Huawei, and was critical about the security of Huawei's technology.

    Then on 6th February 2019,  a letter sent to MPs by Huawei was published. In it Huawei said it could take up to five years to address security issues raised by the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, at a cost of $2bn (£1.5bn) of their own money. The president of Huawei's carrier business group also said the process of adapting its software and engineering processes to meet the UK's requirements was "like replacing components on a high-speed train in motion".

    Huawei also made the following points in the letter to rebut the threat allegations,  "Huawei is a closely watched company.  Were Huawei ever to engage in malicious behaviour, it would not go unnoticed - and it would certainly destroy our business. For us, it is a matter of security or nothing; there is no third option. We choose to ensure security." The letter also addressed the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, stating "no Chinese law obliges any company to install backdoors", a position they have backed up by an international law firm based in London. The letter went on to say that Huawei would refuse requests by the Chinese government to plant backdoors, eavesdropping or spyware on its telecommunications equipment.

    The ball is now in the UK government's court, in the next couple of months we shall see if the UK Gov bans Huawei or continues to work with them to help assure the implied national security threat of their products. A ban could well result in Huawei pulling out of the UK market altogether, taking their billions of pounds of investment with them, and would likely negatively impact post Brexit trade deal negotiations between the UK and China, so we can expect the situation to become even more political in the short term.

    Huawei Threat News Timeline
    Who are Huawei?
    • Chinese multinational conglomerate which specialises in telecommunications equipment, consumer electronics and technology-based services and products.
    • HQ in Shenzhen, Guangdong
    • Founded in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the People's Liberation Army
    • Largest telecommunications-equipment manufacturer in the world
    • Overtook from Apple in 2018 as the second-largest manufacturer of smartphones in the world
    • 72nd on the Fortune Global 500 list
    • 180,000 employees
    • Chinese military remain an important customer for Huawei
    • Invests Billions into R&D around world
    • 3 Billions Customers Globally
    • Operating within the UK for 18 years
    • Made a five year commitment (2018 to 2023) to invest £3 billion in the UK.
    • Allegations its equipment may contain backdoors to allow unauthorised surveillance and/or data theft by the Chinese government and the People’s Liberation Army
    The 5G Evolution
    5G is expected emerge in the UK in late 2019 and early 2020, and will be much faster than 4G. The theoretical maximum speed for 4G is 1Gbps, while the theoretical maximum speed for 5G is 20Gbps, so 5G is potentially up to 20 times faster than 4G. Potentially faster than the UK average broadband speed, which stands at 18.57Gbps.

    Mobile networks are changing with the arrival of 5G and the impact of this change will be felt across the industry. Adrian Taylor, regional VP of sales for A10 Networks, provides the follow insight about the impact of 5G on the market and how it will change the enterprise world.

    5G and the Evolution of Mobile Networks
    Fifth generation networks, just like the preceding 4G LTE and WiMAX networks, are expected to greatly increase available bandwidth, with improved end-to-end performance providing a better end-user experience. In the most basic of terms, 4G LTE was the long-term evolution of Radio Access Networks (RAN); 5G is the next iteration.

    Wireless carriers have invested billions into their networks to support the ongoing demand for faster network speeds. They must look for ways to increase revenue while delivering more value to the end user. This continues to drive new devices into the hands of the consumer. The demand for increased efficiencies, bandwidth, and coverage has pushed carriers towards a decentralised deployment model.

    Network Virtualisation Remains in The Early Stages
    Service providers monitor and review technology for advancements that will help deliver faster and less expensive networks. Recently, they have looked into areas of Network Function Virtualisation (NFV) and automation to support their advancements. Mobile network operators are investing heavily in reducing delays and errors through repetitive processes as they build and add capacity to existing 4G networks.

    Virtualisation and Software Defined Networks (SDN) improvements are driving a shift from hardware to software. SDN is promising, but it’s not an instant solution, as purpose-built hardware still remains the preferred choice. NFV and SDN have offered service providers an alternative to existing methods, including dedicated appliances sitting idle. However, it’s safe to say that the age of virtualisation remains in the early stages.


    Hardware manufacturers and service providers are now betting on the acceptance and success of virtualised functions. Software development continues at breakneck speed to meet timelines and demands for more integrated solutions, which easily scale and reduce operational overheads at the same time.

    The 5G Revenue Opportunity
    5G’s impact is expected to extend beyond the typical mobile network carriers/operators such as Virgin Media, EE, O2, and Sky in the UK and overseas. It promises to enable increased connectivity and flexibility, that will drive additional functions throughout all supportive components of a mobile carrier’s network.

    RAN access providers face the question of how to support the ever-increasing appetite for cutting the cord. How can we use our mobile devices in more ways than previously thought, as the end user goes about their daily tasks? This mobility, whether it’s tied to a carrier’s technology or even a simple Wi-Fi home network, reaches all corners of our day-to-day life.

    This reach extends from the cloud to the data centre environments and continues to drive capacity needs, supported by both legacy appliances and the ever-increasing virtual environments. This continued appetite for consumption has opened up opportunities for all facets of technology and associated vendors.

    5G Mobile Network Evolution
    The continued expansion of 5G networks will have a revolutionary impact upon every mobile subscriber and business in the world.

    The fundamental market forces of network evolution are not based on wired or wireless infrastructure. Companies are currently focused on upgrading existing mobile networks. Whereas at the exact same time, NFV, SDN and the global IoT industry are all preparing to utilise the next generation of mobile networks.

    Software solutions are easier to move from concept to production and frequently offer a lower up-front investment cost. This all adds up to help drive increased functionality for all service providers, including the wired infrastructure.

    5G and IoT will be demand-driven. As a result, the more the infrastructure expands to meet that demand, the more opportunities will be uncovered. It’s a positive feedback loop that will revolutionise how we think of the internet.

    Get ready for a world that will be changed forever with the next generation mobile networks on the horizon.