Category Archives: Huawei

Romania is going to exclude Huawei from its 5G Network

Romania will ban Chinese giant Huawei from its 5G network, reads a joint statement signed by the Romanian and US presidents.

Romania could be the last state in order of time to ban Chinese giant Huawei from its 5G network, reads a joint statement signed by the Romanian and US presidents.

The document was signed by Romania’s Klaus Iohannis and President Donald Trump during the visit of the Romanian President to Washington.

The two states “seek to avoid the security risks that accompany Chinese investment in 5G telecommunications networks”.

Iohannis is worried by the Huawei’s possible participation in the building of the country’s 5G network, he added that the Supreme Council of National Defence (CSAT) would discuss it.

“The Romanian and American delegations also signed a memorandum of understanding on Tuesday establishing the conditions that service providers will have to fulfil to be part of the network.” reads the AFP press.

“These include the obligation not to be under the control of a third country’s government, according to Romanian news website G4Media.”

Romanian Government decided to adopt the “5G strategy for Romania” in June, the technological revolution will create 250,000 jobs and will bring in 4.7 billion euros ($5.2 billion).

The Romanian Government is going to launch a call for tenders for the country’s 5G network in the fourth quarter of this year.

Initially, the government had no intention to ban Huawei but evidently decided to accept the request of President Trump to his allies to exclude the Chinese manufacturer from their infrastructure.

In April, British Government approved a limited role for Huawei in the building of a national 5G network in the country, ignoring security concerns from senior ministers. In December, a Czech cyber-security agency warned against using Huawei and ZTE technologies because they pose a threat to state security.

The Chinese giant was already excluded by several countries from building their 5G internet networks. The United StatesAustraliaNew Zealand, and Japan announced the exclusion of Huawei technology for their 5G internet networks.

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – Huawei, cyberespionage)

Huawei

The post Romania is going to exclude Huawei from its 5G Network appeared first on Security Affairs.

Cyber Security Roundup for July 2019

July was a month of mega data privacy fines. The UK Information Commissioners Office (ICO) announced it intended to fine British Airways £183 million for last September's data breach, where half a million BA customer personal records were compromised. The ICO also announced a £100 million fine for US-based Marriot Hotels after the Hotel chain said 339 million guest personal data records had been compromised by hackers. Those fines were dwarfed on the other side of the pond, with Facebook agreeing to pay a US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) fine of $5 billion dollars, to put the Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal to bed. And Equifax paid $700 million to FTC to settle their 2017 data breach, which involved the loss of at least 147 million personal records. Big numbers indeed, we are seeing the big stick of the GDPR kicking in within the UK, and the FTC flexing some serious privacy rights protection punishment muscles in the US. All 'food for thought' when performing cybersecurity risk assessments.

Through a Freedom of Information request, the UK Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) disclosure a sharp rise of over 1000% in cyber-incidents within UK financial sector in 2018. In my view, this rise was fueled by the mandatory data breach reporting requirement of the GDPR, given it came into force in May 2018. I also think the finance sector was reluctant to report security weakness pre-GDPR, over fears of damaging their customer trust. Would you trust and use a bank if you knew its customers were regularly hit by fraud?

Eurofins Scientific, the UK's largest forensic services provider, which was taken down by a mass ransomware attack last month, paid the cybercrooks ransom according to the BBC News. It wasn't disclosed how much Eurofins paid, but it is highly concerning when large ransoms are paid, as it fuels further ransomware attacks.

A man was arrested on suspicion of carrying out a cyberattack against Lancaster University. The UK National Crime Agency said university had been compromised and "a very small number" of student records, phone numbers and ID documents were accessed. In contrast, the FBI arrested a 33 old software engineer from Seattle, she is alleged to have taken advantage of a misconfigured web application firewall to steal a massive 106 million personal records from Capital One. A stark reminder of the danger of misconfiguring and mismanaging IT security components.

The Huawei international political rhetoric and bun fighting has gone into retreat. UK MPs said there were no technological grounds for a complete Huawei banwhile Huawei said they were 'confident' the UK will choose to include it within 5G infrastructure. Even the White House said it would start to relax the United States Huawei ban. It seems something behind the scenes has changed, this reversal in direction is more likely to be financially motivated than security motivated in my rather cynical view.

A typical busy month for security patch releases, Microsoft, Adobe and Cisco all releasing the expected barrage of security updates for their products. There was security updates released by Apple as well, however, Google researchers announced six iPhone vulnerabilities, including one that remains unpatched.

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Cyber Security Roundup for June 2019

Keep Patching!
June 2019 was another very busy month for security update releases. Microsoft released updates to patch 22 critical rated vulnerabilities, Intel released 11 fixes, and there were also several critical security updates for Apple Airport, Adobe Flash Player, Cisco devices, Cisco Data Centre Network ManagerDell SupportAssistGoogle Chrome, Firefox and Apache.  One further standout vulnerability was the "SACK Panic" TCP Linux and FreeBSD kernel vulnerability, uncovered by Netflix researchers, however, Microsoft released a security advisory in regards to TCP SACK Panic by the end of the month.

The National Security Agency (NSA) backed up UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and Microsoft’s continuing strong recommendations for everyone to apply the latest security updates to all versions of Microsoft Windows, including the unsupported XP, Vista and Windows 2003 Server, to protect against the supercritical CVE-2019-0708 “BlueKeep” vulnerability.

More Major Ransomware Attacks coming to the UK?
We all know the United States government famously takes a stand of no negotiation with terrorists and kidnappers, with the specific policy of never paying ransom demands. There is a good reason for this policy, as paying ransoms just serves to encourage further kidnapping and ransom demands. So it was interesting to learn this month, that US local government does not adhere to the same policy when dealing with ransomware demands. Rivera Beach (Florida) paid a whopping $600,000 ransom to hackers after its computers systems were taken over by ransomware after an employee clicked on a link within a phishing email. Phishing emails are the typical starting ingress of most mass ransomware outbreaks which cripple organisations.  The Lake City (Florida) government officials said they had also paid a $460,000 ransom to cybercrooks following a ransomware attack on their municipality on 10th June.  Meanwhile, Baltimore officials approved $10 million to cover ongoing expenses related to its ransomware attack.

Paying ransomware demands will fuel further ransomware attacks, so I expect ransomware attacks to further escalate. So the big question is, can we expect UK further local government authorities and large organisations to be hard hit by mass ransomware outbreaks? The answer to that will come down to how well their patch management is, and whether lessons have been truly learnt from the destructive 2017 WannaCry ransomware outbreaks, which took down a number of NHS services. Given the recent BlueKeep Microsoft Windows critical vulnerability is expected to spark new strains of ransomware in the coming months, ransomware very much like WannaCry with the devasting capability of rapidly infecting and propagating via unpatched Microsoft Windows systems connected to flat networks, we shall soon find out.

Data Breaches
No major UK data breaches were reported in June 2019, but on the other side of the pond, a misconfigured AWS S3 bucket managed by a data integration company led to confidential data from Netflix, TD Bank, Ford and other companies being exposed. And a misconfigured MongoDB database resulted in 5 million personal records left open to the public via a website. Data breaches caused by misconfigured cloud services operated by third parties is becoming a bit of regular theme.

APT10 Cloud Hopper Campaign further Exposed
An interesting article by Reuters revealed eight of the world’s biggest technology service providers were successfully hacked by APT10 aka 'StonePanda'. APT10, linked to China hackers, operated a sustained campaign over a number of years dubbed “Cloud Hopper”, which Reuters revealed affected Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), IBM, Fujitsu, Tata Consultancy Services, NTT Data, Dimension Data, Computer Sciences Corporation, and DXC Technology. The ATP10 attackers searched for access points into networks an IT systems, when found, extracted confidential information and potential trade secrets. These reported hacks may well be the tip of the iceberg. The Register stated, having gained access to the major service providers, the APT10 group may have gained access to many of their customers. Those customers run into the millions, “dramatically increasing the pool of valuable industrial and aerospace data stolen.”

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Cyber Security Roundup for May 2019

May 2019 was the busiest month of the year for critical security vulnerabilities and patch announcements. The standout was a Microsoft critical security update for Windows, rated with a CVSS score of 9.8 of 10. This vulnerability fixes CVE-2019-0708 aka 'BlueKeep', which if exploited could allow the rapid propagation of malware (i.e. worm) across networked devices, similar to the devastating WannaCry ransomware attacks of 2017.  Such is the concern at Microsoft, they have released BlueKeep patches for their unsupported versions of Windows (i.e. XP, Visa, Server 2003), a very rare occurrence. Researchers at Errata Security said they have found almost one million internet-connected systems which are vulnerable to the BlueKeep bug.

A zero-day Microsoft vulnerability was also reported by an individual called 'SandboxEscaper', which I expect Microsoft will patch as part of their monthly patch cycle in June.  And a past Microsoft vulnerability, CVE-2019-0604, which has a security update available, has been reported as being actively exploited by hackers.

There were also critical security vulnerabilities and patch releases for Adobe, Drupal, Cisco devices, WhatsApp and Intel processorsThe WhatsApp vulnerability (CVE-2019-3568) grabbed the mains stream news headlines. Impacting both iPhone and Android versions of the encrypted mobile messaging app, an Israeli firm called NSO, coded and sold a toolkit which exploited the vulnerability to various government agencies. The NSO toolkit, called Pegasus, granted access a smartphone's call logs, text messages, and could covertly enable and record the camera and microphone. New and fixed versions of WhatsApp are available on AppStore, so update.

Political and UK media controversy surrounding the Huawei security risk went into overdrive in May after Google announced it would be placing restrictions on Chineses telecoms giant accessing its Android operating system. For the further details see my separate post about The UK Government Huawei Dilemma and the Brexit Factor and Huawei section towards the end of this post.

May was a 'fairly quiet' month for data breach disclosures. There were no media reports about UK pub chain 'Greene King', after they emailed customers of their gift card website, to tell them their website had been hacked and that their personal data had been compromised. I covered this breach in a blog post after being contacted by concerned Greene King voucher customers. It seems that TalkTalk did not inform at least 4,500 customers that their personal information was stolen as part of the 2015 TalkTalk data breachBBC consumer show Watchdog investigated and found the personal details of approximately 4,500 customers available online after a Google search. The Equifax data breach recovery has surpassed $1 billion in costs after it lost 148 million customer records in a 2017 security breach.

The UK army is to get a new UK Based Cyber Operations Centre, to help the army conduct offensive cyber operations against 'enemies', following a £22 million investment by the defence secretary Penny Mordaunt. She said "it is time to pay more than lip service to cyber. We know all about the dangers. Whether the attacks come from Russia, China or North Korea. Whether they come from hacktivists, criminals or extremists. Whether its malware or fake news. Cyber can bring down our national infrastructure and undermine our democracy."  The army's cyber operation centre will be up and running next year and should help to plug a 'grey area' between the British security intelligence services and the military.

Action Fraud and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) said UK victims lost £27 million to cryptocurrency and foreign exchange investment scams last year, triple the number of the previous year.

The 2019 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report was released, a key report in understanding what cyber threat actors have been up to and what they are likely to target next. 

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The UK Government Huawei Dilemma and the Brexit Factor

In the last couple of days, Google announced it will be putting restrictions on Huawei’s access to its Android operating system, massively threatening Huawei's smartphone market. Meanwhile, UK based chip designer ARM has told its staff to suspend all business activities with Huawei, over fears it may impact ARM's trade within the United States.  Fuelling these company actions is the United States government's decision to ban US firms with working with Huawei over cybersecurity fears.

The headlines this week further ramps up the pressure on the UK government to follow suit, by implementing a similar ban on the use of Huawei smartphones and network devices within the UK, a step beyond their initial 5G critical infrastructure ban announced last month. But is this really about a foreign nation-state security threat? Or is it more about it geo-economics and international politicking?
Huawei: A Security Threat or an Economic Threat?

Huawei Backdoors
It’s no secret that Huawei was founded in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the People's Liberation Army, and the company was quickly built with the backing of major Chinese state and military contracts. But the US government, secret services and military are also known to invest heavily in Silicon Valley and US tech firms. In recent weeks there have been a number of accusations about deliberate backdoors placed within Huawei devices, implying the usage of Huawei devices could aid Chinese forces in conducting covert surveillance, and with potentially causing catastrophic impacting cyber attacks.
The reality is all software and IT hardware will have a history of exploitable vulnerabilities, and it is pretty much impossible to determine which could be intentionally placed covert backdoors, especially as an advanced and sophisticated nation-state actor would seek to obfuscate any deliberately placed backdoor as an unintentional vulnerability. 

For instance, the following are critical security vulnerabilities reported within tech made by US firms in just the last 9 days, no suggestion any of these are intentionally placed backdoors:
The more usual approach taken by nation-state intelligence and offensive cyber agencies is to invest in finding the unintentional backdoors already present in software and hardware. The discovery of new and completely unknown 'zero-day' security vulnerability is their primary aim. Non-published zero-days vulnerabilities are extremely valuable, clearly, a value lost if they were to inform the vendors about the vulnerability, as they would seek to quickly mitigate with a software patch.

For instance, the United States National Security Agency (NSA) found and exploited vulnerabilities in Windows without informing Microsoft for over five years, creating a specific hacking tool called EternalBlue, which is able to breach networks. The very same tool that was leaked and used within the devasting WannaCry ransomware attack last year. 

The WhatsApp vulnerability reported last week was another public example of this approach, where a private Israeli firm NSO Group found a serious vulnerability within WhatsAppBut instead of informing Facebook to fix it, NSO created a tool to exploit the vulnerability, which it sold to various governments. The ethics of that is a debate for another day.
The Laws which allows Nation-States to Conduct Cyber Surveillance
The United States has significant surveillance powers with the "Patriot Act", the Freedom Act and spying internationally with FISA. China has its equivalent surveillance powers publicly released called the "2017 National Intelligence Law". This law states Chinese organisations are "obliged to support, cooperate with, and collaborate with national intelligence work". But just like Apple, Microsoft and Google, Huawei has categorically said it would refuse to comply with any such government requests, in a letter in UK MPs in February 2019. Huawei also confirmed "no Chinese law obliges any company to install backdoors", a position they have backed up by an international law firm based in London. The letter went on to say that Huawei would refuse requests by the Chinese government to plant backdoors, eavesdropping or spyware on its telecommunications equipment.

The Brexit Factor
There is a lot of geo-politicking and international economics involved with Huawei situation, given the US government are aggressively acting to readdress their Chinese trade deficit. It appears to be more than just a coincidence, the United States government is choosing now to pile on the pressure on its allies to ban Huawei, the world's largest telecommunications equipment manufacturer. Country-wide Huawei bans are extremely good economic news for US tech giants and exporters like Cisco, Google, and Apple, who have been rapidly losing their global market share to cheaper Huawei products in recent years.

To counter the US economic threat to their business foothold within the UK, Huawei is offering a huge carrot in the form of investing billions into UK based research centres, and a big stick in threatening to walk away from the UK market altogether. The has led to the UK government leadership becoming at odds with the MOD, the latter desire to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the US and other NATO allies, in banning Huawei devices. This tension exploded with a very public spat between Prime Minister Theresa May and the Secretary of Defence, Gavin Williamson last month. The PM continued to defy the MOD's security warnings and Gavin Williamson was fired for allegedly leaking classified documents about the Huawei UK national security threat, an accusation which he vehemently denies.

Why the UK Gov is stuck between a Rock and Hard Place
The UK government continue to be stuck between a rock and a hard place, playing a balancing act of trying to keep both the United States and China happy, in a bid to score lucrative post-Brexit multi-billion-pound trade deals. This status-quo leaves UK Huawei smartphone consumers and UK businesses using Huawei network devices, caught in the middle. However, due to the relentless US pressure causing regular negative mainstream media headlines about the security of Huawei products, the Chinese tech giant may well be driven out of UK markets without a UK government ban.


HUAWEI NEWS AND THREAT INTELLIGENCE IN MAY 2019

This Week in Security News: BEC Attacks and Botnet Malware

Welcome to our weekly roundup, where we share what you need to know about the cybersecurity news and events that happened over the past few days. This week, learn about the prevalence and impact of BEC attacks. Also, find out how botnet malware can perform remote code execution, DDoS attacks and cryptocurrency mining.

Read on:

Tech Support Scam Employs New Trick by Using Iframe to Freeze Browsers

Trend Micro discovered a new technical support scam (TSS) campaign that makes use of iframe in combination with basic pop-up authentication to freeze a user’s browser. 

Cybersecurity Pros Could Work for Multiple Agencies Under Bill Passed by Senate

Skilled federal cybersecurity workers could be rotated among civilian agencies under bipartisan legislation the Senate passed to help fill specific gaps in the workforce. 

New Cybersecurity Report Warns CIOs — ‘If You’re Breached Or Hacked, It’s Your Own Fault’

A new cybersecurity survey conducted by endpoint management specialists 1E and technology market researchers Vanson Bourne, a survey that questioned 600 IT operations and IT security decision-makers across the U.S. and U.K., and found that 60% of the organizations had been breached in the last two years and 31% had been breached more than once.

AESDDoS Botnet Malware Exploits CVE-2019-3396 to Perform Remote Code Execution, DDoS Attacks, and Cryptocurrency Mining

Trend Micro’s honeypot sensors detected an AESDDoS botnet malware variant exploiting a server-side template injection vulnerability in a collaboration software program used by DevOps professionals. 

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May Fires Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson Over Huawei Leak

British Prime Minister Theresa May fired Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson, saying he leaked sensitive information surrounding a review into the use of equipment from China’s Huawei Technologies Co. in the U.K.’s telecoms network. 

This Hacker Is Selling Dangerous Windows 0-Day Hacks For Past 3 Years

report by ZDNet has revealed that a mysterious hacker is selling Windows zero-day exploits to the world’s most notorious cybercrime groups for the past three years. At least three cyber-espionage groups also known as Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) are regular customers of this hacker.

Docker Hub Repository Suffers Data Breach, 190,000 Users Potentially Affected

In an email sent to their customers on April 26, Docker reported that the online repository of their popular container platform suffered a data breach that affected 190,000 users. 

IC3: BEC Cost Organizations US$1.2 Billion in 2018

In the recently published 2018 Internet Crime Report by the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), the agency states that in 2018 alone, it received 20,373 BEC/email account compromise (EAC) complaints that racked up a total of over US$1.2 billion in adjusted losses. 

Trend Forward Capital’s First Startup Pitch Competition in Dallas

Trend Forward Capital, in a partnership with Veem, is bringing its Forward Thinker Award and pitch competition to Dallas on May 20. 

BEC Scammers Steal US$1.75 Million From an Ohio Church

The Saint Ambrose Catholic Parish in Brunswick, Ohio was the victim of a BEC attack when cybercriminals gained access to employee email accounts and used them to trick other members of the organization into wiring the payments into a fraudulent bank account. 

Cybersecurity Experts Share Tips And Insights For World Password Day

May 2 is World Password Day. World Password Day falls on the first Thursday in May each year and is intended to raise awareness of password best practices and the need for strong passwords. 

Confluence Vulnerability Opens Door to GandCrab

A vulnerability in a popular devops tool could leave companies with a dose of ransomware to go with their organizational agility, according to researchers at Trend Micro and Alert Logic.

Were you surprised by the amount of business email compromise complaints the FBI received in 2018? Share your thoughts in the comments below or follow me on Twitter to continue the conversation: @JonLClay.

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Fallout from Gavin Williamson sacking | Letters

Readers respond to the sacking of the defence secretary Gavin Williamson over accusations of leaking

While I am delighted that Gavin Williamson (May tells defence secretary: ‘You leaked, you are fired’, 2 May) has been removed from the government – remember he said that all British jihadists should be hunted down and killed in the Middle East rather than returned for trial here – I am sorry that as a result Rory Stewart no longer has responsibility for prisons. His is a deserved promotion, but as prisons minister he was the first member of the government to make any attempt to get to grips with the problems of our criminal justice system and offered to resign if things did not improve. How sad that there are not more of that ilk in public life these days.
Maureen Panton
Malvern, Worcestershire

• Is the Gavin Williamson who has just been sacked as defence secretary for allegedly leaking plans discussed in the National Security Council to allow Huawei to be involved in building the UK’s 5G network the same Gavin Williamson who told us last year that it’s Jeremy Corbyn that “cannot be trusted”?
Sasha Simic
London

Continue reading...

Cyber Security Roundup for April 2019

The UK government controversially gave a green light to Huawei get involved with the building of the UK's 5G networks, although the Chinese tech giant role will be limited to non-sensitive areas of the network, such as providing antennas. This decision made by Theresa May came days after US intelligence announced Huawei was Chinese state funded, and amidst reports historical backdoors in Huawei products, stoking up the Huawei political and security row even further this month, and has resulted in the UK Defence Secretary, Gavin Williamson, being sacked. 
The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) launched a free online tool called "Exercise in a Box", designed by the UK cyber intelligence boffins to help organisations prepare in managing major cyber attacks.  The premise, is the tool will help UK organisations avoid scenarios such as the 2017’s Wannacry attacks, which devastated NHS IT systems and placed patient lives at risk.
 
German drug manufacturing giant, Beyer, found a malware infection, said to originate from a Chinese group called "Wicked Panda".  The malware in question was WINNIT, which is known in the security industry and allows remote access into networks, allowing hackers to deliver further malware and to conduct exploits. In my view, the presence of WINNIT is a sure sign a covert and sustained campaign by a sophisticated threat actor, likely focused on espionage given the company's sector.  Beyer stressed there was no evidence of data theft, but were are still investigating. 
 
Another manufacturing giant severely hit by a cyber attack this month was Aebi Schmidt. A ransomware outbreak impacted its business' operations globally, with most of the damage occurring at their European base. The ransomware wasn't named, but it left multiple Windows systems, on their presumably flat network infrastructure, paralyzed.
 
Facebook may have announced the dawn of their "privacy evolution" at the end of April, but their privacy woes still continue, after Upguard researchers found and reported 540 Million Facebook member records on an unsecured AWS S3 bucket. The "Cultura Colectiva" dataset contained 146GB of data with 540 million records showing comments, likes, reactions, account names, Facebook IDs and more. Looks like Facebook really have their work cut in restoring their consumer's faith in protecting their privacy.
 
UK businesses saw a significant increase in cyber attacks in 2019 according to a report by insurer Hiscox, with 55% of respondents reporting they had faced a cyber attack in 2019, up from 40% from last year.
 
A survey by the NCSC concluded most UK users are still using weak passwords. Released just before CyberUK 2019 conference in Glasgow, which I was unable attend due work commitments, said the most common password on breached accounts was"123456", used by 23.2 million accounts worldwide. Next on the list was "123456789" and "qwerty", "password" and "1111111".  Liverpool was the most common Premier League Football team used as a password, with Blink 182 the most common music act. The NCSC also published a separate analysis of the 100,000 most commonly re-occurring passwords that have been accessed by third parties in global cyber breaches. So password still remains the biggest Achilles' heel with our security.

The UK hacktivist threat came back to the fore this month, after the Anonymous Group took revenge on the UK government for arresting WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, by attacking Yorkshire Councils. I am not sure what Yorkshire link with Assange actually is, but the website for Barnsley Council was taken down by a DDoS attack, a tweet from the group CyberGhost404 linked to the crashed Barnsley Council website and said "Free Assange or chaos is coming for you!". A tweet from an account called 'Anonymous Espana' with an image, suggested they had access to Bedale Council's confidential files, and were threatening to leak them. 
 
Microsoft Outlook.com, Hotmail and MSN users are reported as having their accounts compromised. TechCrunch revealed the breach was caused due to the hackers getting hold of a customer support tech's login credentials. Over two million WiFi passwords were found exposed on an open database by the developer of WiFi Finder. The WiFi Finder App helps to find and log into hotspots.  Two in every three hotel websites leak guest booking details and personal data according to a report. Over 1,500 hotels in 54 countries failed to protect user information.
 
Finally, but not lest, a great report by Recorded Future on the raise of the dark web business of credential stuffing, titled "The Economy of Credential Stuffing Attacks". The report explains how low-level criminals use automated 'checkers' tools to validate compromised credentials, before selling them on.

I am aware of school children getting sucked into this illicit world, typically starts with them seeking to take over better online game accounts after their own account is compromised, they quickly end up with more money than they can spend. Aside from keeping an eye on what your children are up to online as a parent, it goes to underline the importance of using unique complex passwords with every web account (use a password manager or vault to help you - see password security section on the Security Expert website). And always use Multi-Factor Authentication where available, and if you suspect or have are informed your account 'may' have compromised, change your password straight away.

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Vodafone discovered backdoors in Huawei equipment. But it was 2011 ..

Huawei made the headlines again, Vodafone identified backdoors in software that could have handed Huawei unauthorized access to the carrier’s fixed-line network.

According to Bloomberg, Vodafone identified hidden backdoors in software that could have handed Huawei unauthorized access to the carrier’s fixed-line network in Italy used to connect to the internet.

“Now Vodafone Group Plc has acknowledged to Bloomberg that it found vulnerabilities going back years with equipment supplied by Shenzhen-based Huawei for the carrier’s Italian business.” reads the blog post published by Bloomberg. “While Vodafone says the issues were resolved, the revelation may further damage the reputation of a major symbol of China’s global technology prowess.”

Wait a moment the flaws in the Huawei technology were discovered by Vodafone a decade ago.

Bloomberg obtained Vodafone’s security briefing documents from 2009 and 2011 and spoke with people involved in the situation. The version provided by AFP, is slightly different because even if Vodafone confirmed the presence of the flaws, it is not true that bugs could have allowed unauthorized access to Italy’s fixed-line network.

“Vodafone confirmed to AFP that the issues were resolved but stressed it was incorrect to suggest that the flaw could have allowed unauthorized access to Italy’s fixed-line network.” reported the AFP.

Bloomberg revealed that once discovered the backdoors in home routers in 2011, Vodafone asked Huawei to address them. The Chinese firm told the supplier that the issues were fixed, but according to Bloomberg further testing revealed that the vulnerabilities were not completely solved.

“Vodafone asked Huawei to remove backdoors in home internet routers in 2011 and received assurances from the supplier that the issues were fixed, but further testing revealed that the security vulnerabilities remained, the documents show.” continues bloomberg. “Vodafone also identified backdoors in parts of its fixed-access network known as optical service nodes, which are responsible for transporting internet traffic over optical fibers, and other parts called broadband network gateways, which handle subscriber authentication and access to the internet, the people said. “

Bloomberg refers to the backdoor as unauthorized Telnet access to the Huawei equipment.

“The ‘backdoor’ that Bloomberg refers to is Telnet, which is a protocol that is commonly used by many vendors in the industry for performing diagnostic functions. It would not have been accessible from the internet,” Vodafone said in an emailed statement.

“The issues were identified by independent security testing, initiated by Vodafone as part of our routine security measures, and fixed at the time by Huawei,” 

Huawei clarified that the flaws were discovered back in 2011 and 2012 and were quickly fixed.

“We were made aware of historical vulnerabilities in 2011 and 2012 and they were addressed at the time. Software vulnerabilities are an industry-wide challenge.” said Huawei.

Huawei explained it has “a well established public notification and patching process, and when a vulnerability is identified we work closely with our partners to take the appropriate corrective action”.

Huawei is in the middle of a heated debate, many governments, driven by the US, have banned the company from the building of 5G networks.

A few days ago, the British Government has approved a limited role for Huawei in the building of a national 5G network in the country, ignoring security concerns from senior ministers.

Britain’s National Security Council approved a limited role for Huawei to help build a “non-core” infrastructure such as antennas,” Media reports said Prime Minister Theresa May had conditionally allowed Huawei to build the UK 5G network.

According to Bloomberg, Vodafone chief executive Nick Read “has joined peers in publicly opposing any bans on Huawei from 5G rollouts, warning of higher costs and delays”.

Anyway we have to consider that it is not difficult to find vulnerabilities in network equipment of almost any vendor, in many cases the flaws remained unfixed for a long time.

The cases reported by Bloomberg are dated back 2011 and 2012, and the unique aspect of the story to check is if Huawei has addressed the flaw just after Vodafone reported them to the Chinese vendor.

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – China, Vodafone)

The post Vodafone discovered backdoors in Huawei equipment. But it was 2011 .. appeared first on Security Affairs.

Britain ‘Approves’ Huawei role in building ‘non-core’ parts for 5G Network

British Government has approved a limited role for Huawei in the building of a national 5G network in the country, ignoring security concerns from senior ministers

According to The Daily Telegraph newspaper, British Prime Minister Theresa May decided to assign a limited role to Chinese telco giant Huawei in the building of a 5G network in the UK.

The approval continues to raise concerns because the Government ignored security warnings from senior ministers and the US Government.

Home Secretary Sajid Javid, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson, International Trade Secretary Liam Fox and International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt raised serious concerns on the decision.

Britain’s National Security Council approved a limited role for Huawei to help build a “non-core” infrastructure such as antennas”

“Theresa May has given the green light to a Chinese telecoms giant to help build Britain’s new 5G network despite warnings from the US and some of her most senior ministers that it poses a risk to national security.” reads the post published by The Daily Telegraph.

“The National Security Council, which is chaired by the Prime Minister, agreed on Tuesday to allow Huawei limited access to help build parts of the network such as antennas and other “noncore” infrastructure.”

The decision comes as the chancellor Philip Hammond prepares to travel to China to promote the participation of his government in the Belt and Road Initiative.

“According to one person briefed on the discussions, Mrs May approved “in principle” the recent assessment by the National Cyber Security Centre, part of GCHQ, that the risk from Huawei to future 5G telecoms networks could be mitigated.” reported The Financial Times.

At the time of writing, Digital Minister Margot James denied the news reported by the media.

“In spite of cabinet leaks to the contrary, final decision yet to be made on managing threats to telecoms infrastructure,” she tweeted.

“The decision has not been finally made yet and the Prime Minister will take advice form all of the relevant agencies and departments,” she
told Sky News.

On the other side, Huawei praised the alleged decision of the UK government,

“Huawei welcomes reports that the UK government is moving towards allowing Huawei to help build the UK’s 5G network,” it said in a brief statement.

“This green light means that UK businesses and consumers will have access to the fastest and most reliable networks thanks to Huawei’s cutting edge technology.”

“While we await a formal government announcement, we are pleased that the UK is continuing to take an evidence-based approach to its work and we will continue work cooperatively with the government, and the industry,” the Chinese company added.

What will happen after this decision?

The UK is a member of the Five Eyes intelligence alliance (US, UK, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand) and agencies from other countries already expressed their ban on Chinese technology and the decision could raise a heated debate..

Earlier this month Germany also announced that it would not ban Huawei from the auction to build its 5G network.

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – Huawei, 5G)

The post Britain ‘Approves’ Huawei role in building ‘non-core’ parts for 5G Network appeared first on Security Affairs.

French Government App Shows Difficulties with Secure Communications

A messaging app released by the French government to secure internal communications has gotten off to a troubled start.

Tchap was released in beta earlier this month as a secure messaging app exclusively for government officials. Its development and release was made to address security concerns and data vulnerabilities in more widely used apps including WhatsApp and Telegram (a favorite of French Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron).

WhatsApp Meet “What Were You Thinking?”

Tchap was built with security in mind, and was initially touted as being “more secure than Telegram.” Man plans and God laughs. The app was hacked within less than a day of its release. Elliot Alderson, the hacker who discovered the initial security vulnerability, subsequently found four more major flaws in its code, and confirmed with the app’s developer that no security audit was performed on the app prior to release.

DINSIC, the government agency responsible for Tchap, issued a press release stating that the software “will be subject to continuous improvement, both in terms of usability and security,” and has since announced a bug bounty for further vulnerabilities.

The French government’s attempts at creating a secure messaging alternative highlights a cybersecurity conundrum. Recent incidents including the allegations of Chinese government “backdoors” in telecom giant Huawei’s hardware and confirmed NSA backdoors in Windows software have left governments and businesses increasingly wary of using software or hardware developed or data stored internationally. At the same time, development of in-house or “proprietary” solutions are significantly more resource-intensive and not necessarily more secure than their more widely used counterparts.

 

The post French Government App Shows Difficulties with Secure Communications appeared first on Adam Levin.

Huawei releases AirEngine as its new Wi-Fi brand

Huawei announced AirEngine as its new Wi-Fi brand, which will be applied to its full series of enterprise-class Wi-Fi 6 products. Additionally, Huawei highlighted that its Wi-Fi 6 products have been deployed on a large scale in five major regions worldwide. Emerging applications such as Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and 4K require more bandwidth, higher concurrency, and lower latency, which poses challenges to traditional Wi-Fi networks. These challenges must be resolved as quickly … More

The post Huawei releases AirEngine as its new Wi-Fi brand appeared first on Help Net Security.

Cyber Security Roundup for March 2019

The potential threat posed by Huawei to the UK national infrastructure continues to be played out. GCHQ called for a ban on Huawei technology within UK critical networks, such as 5G networks, while Three said a Huawei ban would delay the UK 5G rollout, and the EU ignored the US calls to ban Huawei in 5G rollouts, while promoting the EU Cybersecurity certification scheme to counter the Chinese IT threat, which is all rather confusing.  Meanwhile, Microsoft Researchers found an NSA-style Backdoor in Huawei Laptops, which was reported to Huawei by Microsoft, leading to the flaw being patched in January 2019.
A serious security flaw placed Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) customers at risk. The vulnerability was discovered by PenTest Partners in the bank provided 'Heimdal Thor', security software, which was meant to protect NatWest customers from cyber-attacks but actually permitted remote injection commands at the customer's endpoint. PenTest Partners said "We were able to gain access to a victim's computer very easily. Attackers could have had complete control of that person's emails, internet history and bank details. To do this we had to intercept the user's internet traffic but that is quite simple to do when you consider the unsecured public wi-fi out there, and it's often all too easy to compromise home wi-fi setups.
 
Facebook made negative security headlines yet against after they disclosed that 20,000 of their employees had access to hundreds of millions of their user account passwords for years.

One of the world’s biggest aluminium producers, 
Norsk Hydrosuffered production outages after a ransomware outbreak impacted its European and US operations.  Damages from ransomware attack on Norsk Hydro reach as high as $40M.

Citrix disclosed a security breach of its internal network may have compromised 6Tb of sensitive data. The FBI had told Citrix that international cyber criminals had likely gained access to its internal network. Citrix said in a statement it had taken action to contain the breach, “We commenced a forensic investigation; engaged a leading cyber security firm to assist; took actions to secure our internal network; and continue to cooperate with the FBI”.  According to security firm Resecurity, the attacks were perpetrated by Iranian-linked group known as IRIDIUM.

Credit monitoring Equifax admitted in a report it didn't follow its own patching schedule, neglecting to patch Apache Struts which led to a major 2017 breach which impacted 145 million people.  The report also said Equifax delayed alerting their customers for 6 weeks after detecting the breach.

ASUS computers had backdoors added through its software update system, in an attack coined “ShadowHammer”. Kaspersky researchers estimated malware was distributed to nearly a million people, although the cybercriminals appeared to have only targeted 600 specific devices. Asus patched the vulnerability but questions still remain.


The top 10 biggest breaches of 2018 according to 4iQ were:
  1. Anti-Public Combo Collections – (Hacked) Sanixer Collection #1-6, 1.8 billion unique email addresses.
  2. Aadhaar, India – (Open third party device) 1.1 billion people affected
  3. Marriott Starwood Hotels – (Hacked) 500 million guests PII
  4. Exactis – (Open device) 340 million people and businesses.
  5. HuaZhu Group – (Accidental Exposure) 240 million records
  6. Apollo – (Open device) 150 million app users.
  7. Quora – (Hacked) 100 million users.
  8. Google+ – (API Glitch) 52.2 million users.
  9. Chegg – (Hacked) 40 million accounts 
  10. Cathay Pacific Airways (Targeted attack) 9.4 million passengers.
Barracuda Networks reported the top 12 phishing email subject lines, after they analysed 360,000 phishing emails over a three-month period.
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British Government Report Confirms Huawei Cybersecurity Concerns

A report issued by the British government has concluded that products developed and manufactured by the Chinese telecommunications company Huawei present significant security risks.

Assembled by the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC) and presented to the UK National Security Adviser, the report found that on a wide range of security issues related to both its software and engineering, Huawei has failed to maintain adequate protections.

“Poor software engineering and cybersecurity processes lead to security and quality issues, including vulnerabilities. The number and severity of vulnerabilities discovered, along with architectural and build issues, by the relatively small team in HCSEC is a particular concern. If an attacker has knowledge of these vulnerabilities and sufficient access to exploit them, they may be able to affect the operation of the network, in some cases causing it to cease operating correctly,” stated the report, going on to add:

“These findings are about basic engineering competence and cybersecurity hygiene that give rise to vulnerabilities that are capable of being exploited by a range of actors.”

Huawei has been the subject of ongoing controversy in the West. Its bids to build the infrastructure for 5G wireless networks have been blocked in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand for security reasons and allegations that their equipment has backdoors that the Chinese government can exploit. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has warned European nations that using Huawei equipment make it “more difficult” for the U.S. to partner with them.

Huawei is currently suing the United States over the ban, and the company’s chairman Guo Ping accused the U.S. government of having a “loser’s attitude,” and that “The U.S. has abandoned all table manners.”

The post British Government Report Confirms Huawei Cybersecurity Concerns appeared first on Adam Levin.

Cyber Security Roundup for February 2019

The perceived threat posed by Huawei to the UK national infrastructure continued to make the headlines throughout February, as politicians, UK government agencies and the Chinese telecoms giant continued to play out their rather public spat in the media. See my post Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security? for further details. And also, why DDoS might be the greater threat to 5G than Huawei supplied network devices.

February was a rather quiet month for hacks and data breaches in the UK, Mumsnet reported a minor data breach following a botched upgrade, and that was about it. The month was a busy one for security updates, with Microsoft, Adobe and Cisco all releasing high numbers of patches to fix various security vulnerabilities, including several released outside of their scheduled monthly patch release cycles.

A survey by PCI Pal concluded the consequences of a data breach had a greater impact in the UK than the United States, in that UK customers were more likely to abandon a company when let down by a data breach. The business reputational impact should always be taken into consideration when risk assessing security.


Another survey of interest was conducted by Nominet, who polled 408 Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) at midsize and large organisations in the UK and the United States. A whopping 91% of the respondents admitted to experiencing high to moderate levels of stress, with 26% saying the stress had led to mental and physical health issues, and 17% said they had turned to alcohol. The contributing factors for this stress were job security, inadequate budget and resources, and a lack of support from the board and senior management. A CISO role can certainly can be a poisoned-chalice, so its really no surprise most CISOs don't stay put for long.

A Netscout Threat Landscape Report declared in the second half of 2018, cyber attacks against IoT devices and DDoS attacks had both rose dramatically. Fuelled by the compromise of high numbers of IoT devices, the number of DDoS attacks in the 100GBps to 200GBps range increased 169%, while those in the 200GBps to 300GBps range exploded 2,500%. The report concluded cybercriminals had built and used cheaper, easier-to-deploy and more persistent malware, and cyber gangs had implemented this higher level of efficiency by adopting the same principles used by legitimate businesses. These improvements has helped malicious actors greatly increase the number of medium-size DDoS attacks while infiltrating IoT devices even quicker.

In a rare speech, Jeremy Fleming, the head of GCHQ warned the internet could deteriorate into "an even less governed space" if the international community doesn't come together to establish a common set of principles. He said "China, Iran, Russia and North Korea" had broken international law through cyber attacks, and made the case for when "offensive cyber activities" were good, saying "their use must always meet the three tests of legality, necessity and proportionality. Their use, in particular to cause disruption or damage - must be in extremis".  Clearly international law wasn't developed with cyber space in mind, so it looks like GCGQ are attempting to raise awareness to remedy that.

I will be speaking at the e-crime Cyber Security Congress in London on 6th March 2019, on cloud security, new business metrics, future risks and priorities for 2019 and beyond.

Finally, completely out of the blue, I was informed by 4D that this blog had been picked by a team of their technical engineers and Directors as one of the best Cyber Security Blogs in the UK. The 6 Best Cyber Security Blogs - A Data Centre's Perspective Truly humbled and in great company to be on that list.

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    What’s the greater risk to UK 5G, Huawei backdoors or DDoS?

    Have we been focusing too much on the Huawei backdoor threat instead of the DDoS threat facing the incoming 5G network infrastructure? Lee Chen, CEO at A10 networks thinks so.

    The size and sophistication of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have risen at an ever-accelerating pace. As new 5G networks become operational, we expect the size of attacks will dwarf these records. This is primarily due to the increase in IoT devices that 5G will introduce, with the number set to reach 4.1 billion globally by 2024. Each device is a perfect nest for botnets carrying malware, offering a new DDoS weapon for hackers to take advantage of.

    Service providers will need to evolve rapidly with these growing threats and adopt intelligent automation to detect and mitigate security anomalies in a matter of seconds. Sophisticated DDoS threat intelligence, combined with real-time threat detection and automated signature extraction, will allow the marketplace to defend against even the most massive multi-vector DDoS attacks, no matter where they originate.


    The Huawei threat remains a political football, there is still uncertainty on whether the Chinese telecoms giant's network devices will be banned in the UK or not. I have updated my post - Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security? with the latest developments.

    Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security?

    On 19th July 2018 the UK government, through the GCHQ backed Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, gave “limited assurance” that Huawei poses no threat to UK National Security. Since then the UK, EU, and NATO member government politicians and security services have all raised concerns about the nation-state cyber threat posed by the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei. 

    There has been particular political unease around the Huawei provision of network infrastructure devices (i.e. switches and routers etc.) within the UK national infrastructure, devices which controls network traffic and capable of accessing the data that traverses them. Huawei has been operating in the UK market for 18 years, whether its their smart phones or a network devices, Huawei products are generally far cheaper than their competitors' equivalents. This has led to major telecoms providers such as BT, purchasing and implementing Huawei network devices within their telecommunications infrastructure and data centres, some of which are regarded as critical components within the UK national infrastructure. As such, Huawei has been subject to unfavourable security scrutiny, which has recently spilt out into political and media arenas. 


    Huawei has always denied its products poses a threat, and there is no evidence of any malicious capability or activity publicly disclosure by any UK intelligence agencies or cyber security firms. But there is also the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, which states that Chinese organisations are obliged to "support, cooperate with, and collaborate in, national intelligence work".

    Three nations in the intelligence alliance ‘Five Eyes’, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have effectively prohibited the installation of Huawei equipment within their generation telecommunications equipment, namely 5G networks. The remaining two members of "Five Eyes", the United Kingdom and Canada, are expected to state their position within the coming months. The UK's National Cyber Security Centre has published warnings about the Chinese company's security standards. Elsewhere, nations including France, Germany and India have expressed their concerns about the use of Huawei equipment within their telecommunications 5G upgrades.


    On 4th February, a leaked draft 'Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre' 2019 report, said the issues and findings it had raised previously had not been fully addressed by Huawei, and was critical about the security of Huawei's technology.

    Then on 6th February 2019,  a letter sent to MPs by Huawei was published. In it Huawei said it could take up to five years to address security issues raised by the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, at a cost of $2bn (£1.5bn) of their own money. The president of Huawei's carrier business group also said the process of adapting its software and engineering processes to meet the UK's requirements was "like replacing components on a high-speed train in motion".

    Huawei also made the following points in the letter to rebut the threat allegations,  "Huawei is a closely watched company.  Were Huawei ever to engage in malicious behaviour, it would not go unnoticed - and it would certainly destroy our business. For us, it is a matter of security or nothing; there is no third option. We choose to ensure security." The letter also addressed the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, stating "no Chinese law obliges any company to install backdoors", a position they have backed up by an international law firm based in London. The letter went on to say that Huawei would refuse requests by the Chinese government to plant backdoors, eavesdropping or spyware on its telecommunications equipment.

    The ball is now in the UK government's court, in the next couple of months we shall see if the UK Gov bans Huawei or continues to work with them to help assure the implied national security threat of their products. A ban could well result in Huawei pulling out of the UK market altogether, taking their billions of pounds of investment with them, and would likely negatively impact post Brexit trade deal negotiations between the UK and China, so we can expect the situation to become even more political in the short term.

    Huawei Threat News Timeline
    Who are Huawei?
    • Chinese multinational conglomerate which specialises in telecommunications equipment, consumer electronics and technology-based services and products.
    • HQ in Shenzhen, Guangdong
    • Founded in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the People's Liberation Army
    • Largest telecommunications-equipment manufacturer in the world
    • Overtook from Apple in 2018 as the second-largest manufacturer of smartphones in the world
    • 72nd on the Fortune Global 500 list
    • 180,000 employees
    • Chinese military remain an important customer for Huawei
    • Invests Billions into R&D around world
    • 3 Billions Customers Globally
    • Operating within the UK for 18 years
    • Made a five year commitment (2018 to 2023) to invest £3 billion in the UK.
    • Allegations its equipment may contain backdoors to allow unauthorised surveillance and/or data theft by the Chinese government and the People’s Liberation Army
    The 5G Evolution
    5G is expected emerge in the UK in late 2019 and early 2020, and will be much faster than 4G. The theoretical maximum speed for 4G is 1Gbps, while the theoretical maximum speed for 5G is 20Gbps, so 5G is potentially up to 20 times faster than 4G. Potentially faster than the UK average broadband speed, which stands at 18.57Gbps.

    Mobile networks are changing with the arrival of 5G and the impact of this change will be felt across the industry. Adrian Taylor, regional VP of sales for A10 Networks, provides the follow insight about the impact of 5G on the market and how it will change the enterprise world.

    5G and the Evolution of Mobile Networks
    Fifth generation networks, just like the preceding 4G LTE and WiMAX networks, are expected to greatly increase available bandwidth, with improved end-to-end performance providing a better end-user experience. In the most basic of terms, 4G LTE was the long-term evolution of Radio Access Networks (RAN); 5G is the next iteration.

    Wireless carriers have invested billions into their networks to support the ongoing demand for faster network speeds. They must look for ways to increase revenue while delivering more value to the end user. This continues to drive new devices into the hands of the consumer. The demand for increased efficiencies, bandwidth, and coverage has pushed carriers towards a decentralised deployment model.

    Network Virtualisation Remains in The Early Stages
    Service providers monitor and review technology for advancements that will help deliver faster and less expensive networks. Recently, they have looked into areas of Network Function Virtualisation (NFV) and automation to support their advancements. Mobile network operators are investing heavily in reducing delays and errors through repetitive processes as they build and add capacity to existing 4G networks.

    Virtualisation and Software Defined Networks (SDN) improvements are driving a shift from hardware to software. SDN is promising, but it’s not an instant solution, as purpose-built hardware still remains the preferred choice. NFV and SDN have offered service providers an alternative to existing methods, including dedicated appliances sitting idle. However, it’s safe to say that the age of virtualisation remains in the early stages.


    Hardware manufacturers and service providers are now betting on the acceptance and success of virtualised functions. Software development continues at breakneck speed to meet timelines and demands for more integrated solutions, which easily scale and reduce operational overheads at the same time.

    The 5G Revenue Opportunity
    5G’s impact is expected to extend beyond the typical mobile network carriers/operators such as Virgin Media, EE, O2, and Sky in the UK and overseas. It promises to enable increased connectivity and flexibility, that will drive additional functions throughout all supportive components of a mobile carrier’s network.

    RAN access providers face the question of how to support the ever-increasing appetite for cutting the cord. How can we use our mobile devices in more ways than previously thought, as the end user goes about their daily tasks? This mobility, whether it’s tied to a carrier’s technology or even a simple Wi-Fi home network, reaches all corners of our day-to-day life.

    This reach extends from the cloud to the data centre environments and continues to drive capacity needs, supported by both legacy appliances and the ever-increasing virtual environments. This continued appetite for consumption has opened up opportunities for all facets of technology and associated vendors.

    5G Mobile Network Evolution
    The continued expansion of 5G networks will have a revolutionary impact upon every mobile subscriber and business in the world.

    The fundamental market forces of network evolution are not based on wired or wireless infrastructure. Companies are currently focused on upgrading existing mobile networks. Whereas at the exact same time, NFV, SDN and the global IoT industry are all preparing to utilise the next generation of mobile networks.

    Software solutions are easier to move from concept to production and frequently offer a lower up-front investment cost. This all adds up to help drive increased functionality for all service providers, including the wired infrastructure.

    5G and IoT will be demand-driven. As a result, the more the infrastructure expands to meet that demand, the more opportunities will be uncovered. It’s a positive feedback loop that will revolutionise how we think of the internet.

    Get ready for a world that will be changed forever with the next generation mobile networks on the horizon.

        Cyber Security Roundup for December 2018

        The final Cyber Security Roundup of 2018 concludes reports of major data breaches, serious software vulnerabilities and evolving cyber threats, so pretty much like the previous 11 months of the year.

        5.3 millions users of "make your own avatar" app Boomoji had their accounts compromised, after the company reportedly didn't secure their internet connected databases properly. "Question and Answer" website Quora also announced the compromise of 100 million of its user accounts following a hack.


        A large data breach reported in Brazil is of interest, a massive 120 million Brazilian citizens personal records were compromised due to a poorly secured Amazon S3 bucket. This is not the first mass data breach caused by an insecure S3 bucket we've seen in 2018, the lesson to be learnt in the UK, is to never assume or take cloud security for granted, its essential practice to test and audit cloud services regularly.

        Amongst the amazing and intriguing space exploration successes reported by NASA in December, the space agency announced its employee's personal data may had been compromised. Lets hope poor security doesn't jeopardise the great and highly expensive work NASA are undertaking.  
        NASA InSight Lander arrives on Mars 

        It wouldn't be normal for Facebook not to be in the headlines for poor privacy, this time Facebook announced a Photo API bug which exposed 6.8 million user images

        Away from the political circus that is Brexit, the European Parliament put into a law a new Cybersecurity Act. Because of the Brexit making all the headlines, this new law may have gone under the radar, but it certainly worth keeping an eye on, even after UK leaves the EU. The EU Parliament has agreed to increase the budget for the ENISA (Network & InfoSec) agency, which will be rebranded as the "EU Agency for Cybersecurity". The Cybersecurity Act will establish an EU wide framework for cyber-security certifications for online services and customer devices to be used within the European Economic Area, and will include IoT devices and critical infrastructure technology. Knowing the EU's love of regulations, I suspect these new best practice framework and associated accreditations to be turned into regulations further down the line, which would impact any tech business operating in European Union.

        The UK Parliament enacted the "The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act", which also went under the radar due to all the Brexit political noise. The act requires the appointment of a data guardian within England and Wales. The data guardian will publish guidance on the processing of health and adult social care data for use by public bodies providing health or social care services, and produce an annual report.

        Chinese telecoms giant Huawei had plenty of negative media coverage throughout December, with UK government pressuring BT into not using Huawei kit within BT's new 5G network, due to a perceived threat to UK's future critical national infrastructure posed by the Chinese stated-backed tech giant.  The UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said he had "very deep concerns" about Huawei being involved in new UK mobile network.
        Security company Insinia cause controversy after it took over the Twitter accounts by Eamon Holmes, Louis Theroux and several others celebs. Insinia said it had managed the account takeover by analysing the way Twitter handles messages posted by phone, to inject messages onto the targeted accounts by analysing the way the social network interacted with smartphones when messages are sent. However, Insinia were accused of being unethical and breaking the UK Computer Misuse Act in some quarters.

        Unsecured internet connected printers are being hacked again, this time they were used to sent print out messages of support for Swedish YouTube star PewDiePie. A hacker named TheHackerGiraffe was said to have targeted up 50,000 printers after using Shodan to search for open printer ports online, the scan was said to have found 800,000 vulnerable printers.

        An Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) report warned UK banks about their over-reliance on third-party security providers. The FCA said companies "generally lacked board members with strong familiarity or specific technical cyber-expertise. External expertise may be helpful but may also, if overly relied on, undermine the effectiveness of the ‘three lines of defence’ model in identifying and managing cyber-risks in a timely way. The report also warned about supply-chain security, especially the role that firms play in other organisations’ supply chains.

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