Category Archives: hardware

Denial of Service vulnerability discovered in Triconex TriStation Software Suite Emulator

Applied Risk ICS Security Consultant Tom Westenberg discovered a DoS vulnerability in an emulated version of the Triconex TriStation Software Suite. Triconex is a Schneider Electric brand which supplies systems and products in regards to critical control and industrial safety-shutdown technology. The Triconex Emulator is software that allows users to emulate and execute TriStation 1131 applications without connecting to a Tricon, Trident, or Tri-GP controller. Using the Emulator, users can test applications in an offline … More

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Latest trends in automated threat intelligence-driven network security

Since the earliest days of the Internet both network threats and network defenses have been evolving. In this Help Net Security podcast recorded at RSA Conference 2019, Todd Weller, Chief Strategy Officer at Bandura Cyber, talks about the latest trends in automated threat intelligence-driven network security. Here’s a transcript of the podcast for your convenience. We’re here with Todd Weller, CSO of Bandura Cyber. How are you Todd? I’m great. Fired up for another RSA … More

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DARPA Is Developing an Open-Source Voting System

This sounds like a good development:

...a new $10 million contract the Defense Department's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has launched to design and build a secure voting system that it hopes will be impervious to hacking.

The first-of-its-kind system will be designed by an Oregon-based firm called Galois, a longtime government contractor with experience in designing secure and verifiable systems. The system will use fully open source voting software, instead of the closed, proprietary software currently used in the vast majority of voting machines, which no one outside of voting machine testing labs can examine. More importantly, it will be built on secure open source hardware, made from special secure designs and techniques developed over the last year as part of a special program at DARPA. The voting system will also be designed to create fully verifiable and transparent results so that voters don't have to blindly trust that the machines and election officials delivered correct results.

But DARPA and Galois won't be asking people to blindly trust that their voting systems are secure -- as voting machine vendors currently do. Instead they'll be publishing source code for the software online and bring prototypes of the systems to the Def Con Voting Village this summer and next, so that hackers and researchers will be able to freely examine the systems themselves and conduct penetration tests to gauge their security. They'll also be working with a number of university teams over the next year to have them examine the systems in formal test environments.