Category Archives: Google Chrome

Extensión de Chrome avisa si las credenciales del usuario están comprometidas

Google escogió el Día de Inter Segura para anunciar Password Checkup, una extensión de Chrome diseñada para avisar a los usuarios cuando introducen un nombre de usuario y contraseña que la empresa ha detectado en alguna filtración. Al igual que el recientemente lanzado Mozilla Firefox Monitor, Password Checkup tiene un nivel superficial sencillo en el […]

Google Launches Password Checkup Extension To Detect Breached Credentials

Breached usernames and passwords have become a pain in the neck with regards to online security. Even if your account

Google Launches Password Checkup Extension To Detect Breached Credentials on Latest Hacking News.

Google Chrome announces plans to improve URL display, website identity

“Unreadable gobbledygook” is one way to describe URLs today as we know them, and Google has been attempting to redo their look for years. In their latest move to improve how Chrome—and of course, how the company hopes other browsers would follow suit—displays the URL in its omnibox (the address bar), Google’s Chrome team has made public two projects that usher them in this direction.

First, they launched Trickuri (pronounced as “trickery”) in time for a talk they were scheduled to present at the 2019 Enigma Conference. Second, they’re working on creating warnings of potentially phishy URLs for Chrome users.

Watch out! Some trickery and phishing ahead

Trickuri is an open-source tool where developers can test whether their applications display URLs accurately and consistently in different scenarios. The new Chrome warnings, on the other hand, are still in internal testing. Emily Stark, Google Chrome’s Usability Security Lead, confesses that the challenge lies in creating heuristic rules that appropriately flag malicious URLs while avoiding false positives.

“Our heuristics for detecting misleading URLs involve comparing characters that look similar to each other and domains that vary from each other just by a small number of characters,” Stark said in an interview with WIRED. “Our goal is to develop a set of heuristics that pushes attackers away from extremely misleading URLs, and a key challenge is to avoid flagging legitimate domains as suspicious. This is why we’re launching this warning slowly, as an experiment.”

These efforts are part of the team’s current focus, which is the detection and flagging of seemingly dubious URLs.

Google Chrome’s bigger goal

The URL is used to identify entities online. It is the first place users look to assess if they are in a good place or not. But not everyone knows the components that comprise a URL, much less what they mean in the syntax. Google’s push for website owners to use HTTPS has rippled across browser developers and consequently changed user preferences to favor such sites. In effect, by pushing HTTPS, Google changed the game to give the user a generally safer online experience.

However, Google wants to go beyond this, and are set on raising user awareness of relevant parts of the URL (so they can make quick security decisions). As a result, they are refining Chrome to present these parts while keeping users’ view away from the irrelevant gibberish.

In a separate interview with WIRED, Adrienne Porter Felt, Google Chrome’s Engineering Manager, has this to say about how users perceive the URL: “People have a really hard time understanding URLs. They’re hard to read, it’s hard to know which part of them is supposed to be trusted, and in general I don’t think URLs are working as a good way to convey site identity. So we want to move toward a place where web identity is understandable by everyone—they know who they’re talking to when they’re using a website and they can reason about whether they can trust them. But this will mean big changes in how and when Chrome displays URLs. We want to challenge how URLs should be displayed and question it, as we’re figuring out the right way to convey identity.”

While these may all sound good, no one—not even Google—knows what the final, new URL will look like at this point.

A brief timeline of Google’s efforts in changing the URL

Below is a brief timeline of attempts Google has made to how Chrome displays the URL in the omnibox:

“…it just raises too many questions.”

With Google’s new effort, how will it affect redirection schemes? SEO? Shortened URLs?

Will this, in time, affect the behavior of new Internet users entering URLs in the address bar? For example, what if they don’t know that certain URL elements are (by default) elided but should now be typed in (such as entering ‘www’) to go to their desired destination? Will they understand the meaning of .com or .org if these elements are erased from view?

How can web developers, business owners, and consumers prepare themselves for these URL changes?

Right now, there’s more uncertainty than there are answers, as Google admits there is still a lot of work to be done. And based on the tone of several spokespersons in interviews, the company also expects some pushback and a degree of controversy that may arise from their efforts. Change is never easy.

Let’s keep an eye on this URLephant in the room, shall we? And let’s also keep giving feedback and raising questions. After all, this is Google’s way of keeping Chrome users away from URL-based threats. If changes are not implemented with thoughtful precision, then threat actors can easily find a way around them, or at least bank on the confusion resulting from a poor rollout of new processes.

While the future of URLs is still murky, one thing’s for certain: the bad guys know how to exploit weaknesses. So we hope, for Google and all its users’ sake, changes in URL display only serve to strengthen everyone’s security posture online.

Further reading:

 

The post Google Chrome announces plans to improve URL display, website identity appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

CookieMiner: Steals Passwords From Cookies, Chrome And iPhone Texts!



There’s a new malware CookieMiner, prevalent in the market which binges on saved passwords on Chrome, iPhone text messages and Mac-tethered iTunes backups.

A world-wide cyber-security organization not of very late uncovered a malicious malware which gorges on saved user credentials like passwords and usernames.

This activity has been majorly victimizing passwords saved onto Google Chrome, credit card credentials saved onto Chrome and iPhone text messages backed up to Mac.

Reportedly, what the malware does is that it gets hold of the browser cookies in relation with mainstream crypto-currency exchanges which also include wallet providing websites the user has gone through.

The surmised motive behind the past acts of the miner seems to be the excruciating need to bypass the multi-factor authentication for the sites in question.

Having dodged the main security procedure, the cyber-con behind the attack would be absolutely free to access the victim’s exchange account or the wallet so being used and to exploit the funds in them.

Web cookies are those pieces of information which get automatically stored onto the web server, the moment a user signs in.

Hence, exploitation of those cookies directly means exploiting the very user indirectly.

Cookie theft is the easiest way to dodge login anomaly detection, as if the username and passwords are used by an amateur, the alarms might set off and another authentication request may get sent.

Whereas if the username passwords are used along with the cookie the entire session would absolutely be considered legit and no alert would be issued after all.

Most of the fancy wallet and crypto-currency exchange websites have multi-factor authentication.

All that the CookieMiner does is that it tries to create combinations and try them in order to slide past the authentication process.

A cyber-con could treat such a vulnerable opportunity like a gold mine and could win a lot out of it.

In addition to Google’s Chrome, Apple’s Safari is also a web browser being openly targeted. As it turns out, the choice for the web browser target depends upon its recognition.

The malware seems to have additional malignancy to it as it also finds a way to download a “CoinMiner” onto the affected system/ device.

¡Actualiza ya! Chrome y Firefox solucionan problemas de seguridad

Nos encontramos ante la primera actualización de navegadores con tanto Google y Mozilla solucionando vulnerabilidades de seguridad tanto en Chrome y Firefox para Mac, Windows, y Linux. Pero en cuanto a la seguridad de Chrome de su versión 72, se trata más de lo que se ha quitado de lo que se ha añadido. Uno […]

Google Chrome 72: Deprecates TLS 1.0 And 1.1

Google has rolled out the latest version of their Chrome browser for all compatible operating systems. The new Google Chrome

Google Chrome 72: Deprecates TLS 1.0 And 1.1 on Latest Hacking News.

Google Chrome to Get Drive-by Download Protection

Engineers at Google are working on drive-by download protection for Chromium. Googles Chrome browser is based on the open-source engine

Google Chrome to Get Drive-by Download Protection on Latest Hacking News.

Chrome API Update Kills Ad Blockers Along With Numerous Other Extensions

Google has announced making some changes in their Chrome API that (in a way) threatens user privacy. As per its

Chrome API Update Kills Ad Blockers Along With Numerous Other Extensions on Latest Hacking News.