Category Archives: Encryption

Employees are aware of USB drive security risks, but don’t follow best practices

Employees are aware of the risks associated with inadequate USB drive security – yet their employers aren’t mandating following best practices, according to a report by Apricorn. “The State of USB Data Protection 2019: Employee Spotlight” survey report, which polled nearly 300 employees across industries including education, finance, government, healthcare, legal, retail, manufacturing, and power and energy, examined year-over-year trends of USB drive usage, policies and business drivers. The report reveals that while employees have … More

The post Employees are aware of USB drive security risks, but don’t follow best practices appeared first on Help Net Security.

Cryptanalysis of SIMON-32/64

A weird paper was posted on the Cryptology ePrint Archive (working link is via the Wayback Machine), claiming an attack against the NSA-designed cipher SIMON. You can read some commentary about it here. Basically, the authors claimed an attack so devastating that they would only publish a zero-knowledge proof of their attack. Which they didn't. Nor did they publish anything else of interest, near as I can tell.

The paper has since been deleted from the ePrint Archive, which feels like the correct decision on someone's part.

How Business can address the Security Concerns of Online Shoppers

It’s no secret that cybersecurity is an epidemic problem that affects online businesses on a global scale. E-commerce businesses are especially affected by data breaches because it weakens the consumer’s trust in online businesses to protect their personal data. In response to the growing number of breaches, governments and enterprises alike are stepping up to the plate to provide sustainable solutions to the problem.

The UK is aiming to become a world leader in cybersecurity by investing a substantial amount of money (to the tune of £70 million) in the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund. The fund represents the government’s commitment to increase funding in research and development by £4.7 billion over a four year period. One of the primary goals of the investment will be to supply the industry with the money necessary to design and develop state-of-the-art hardware that’s more secure and resilient to common cyber threats.

The logic stems from the fact that cybercriminals are constantly finding new ways to exploit current technology, so the best way to combat future attacks is to design chips and hardware with stronger security features built into them to outpace cyber threats. However, this means businesses will have to invest in new IT systems as it rolls out to keep their security measures up to par.

For the time being, online business owners need to do everything in their power to address the privacy concerns of their users. In some cases, this might mean investing in more secure and modern e-commerce platforms that offer security features, such as TLS (still commonly known as SSL) protection and security software to protect against malware attacks, or simply generating new, strong admin passwords on a regular basis.

The fact is, there is no way to provide customers with a 100% guarantee their personal data is safe, but there are actions webmasters and companies can do to make their websites a lot safer to use by their customers. To help you learn more about how you can secure your site from cyber threats, Wikibuy has laid out 15 steps in the infographic below.


How Business Owners Can Address Online Shopping Concerns

Facebook stored hundreds of millions of passwords unprotected

Company admits to mistake and says it has no evidence of abuse – but the risk was huge

Facebook mistakenly stored “hundreds of millions” of passwords in plaintext, unprotected by any encryption, the company has admitted.

The mistake, which led to user passwords being kept in Facebook’s internal servers in an insecure way, affects “hundreds of millions of Facebook Lite users, tens of millions of other Facebook users, and tens of thousands of Instagram users”, according to the social networking site. Facebook Lite is a version of Facebook created for use in nations where mobile data is unaffordable or unavailable.

Related: Facebook's security is so bad it's surprising Zuckerberg hasn't deleted his account

Continue reading...

Why the government isn’t a fan of commercial encryption


Federal governments and major technology firms are arguing for or against encryption, respectively. But why?

Due to recent political turmoil and devastating events overseas, the topic of end-to-end encryption has reentered public discussion. At the center of the debate, you have federal governments and major technology firms, each arguing for or against encryption.

The Encryption That Businesses Need, But CISOs Forget About

 By Joseph Steinberg  CEO, SecureMySocial JosephSteinberg

 

Many businesspeople put their firms’ data at risk because they fail to understand several important concepts about encryption. Simply understanding that data can be protected from unauthorized parties by encrypting it is insufficient to deliver security; in order to secure information people must know when needs to be secured, and must actually encrypt accordingly.

Should You Encrypt Data Before it Goes to the Cloud?

 

American cloud service providers such as Microsoft are opening local data centers in foreign countries at the request of the respective foreign governments and customers located in those countries. The thinking behind this strategy is that data located in a particular country is subject to the country’s data privacy laws, which may be different from those in effect in the United States. When your data is stored in the country where your customers are resident, it seems logical to believe cloud service providers when they say their local data centers operate according to that country’s laws. In reality, the situation is more complicated, and the location of the data in a particular country is not enough to guarantee privacy.