Category Archives: Emotet

Threat Roundup for October 16 to October 23

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between October 16 and October 23. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201023-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for October 16 to October 23 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

Threat Roundup for October 9 to October 16

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between October 9 and October 16. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201016-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for October 9 to October 16 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

Threat Roundup for October 2 to October 9

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed between September 25 and October 2. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Read More

Reference

20201009-tru.json – this is a JSON file that includes the IOCs referenced in this post, as well as all hashes associated with the cluster. The list is limited to 25 hashes in this blog post. As always, please remember that all IOCs contained in this document are indicators, and that one single IOC does not indicate maliciousness. See the Read More link above for more details.

The post Threat Roundup for October 2 to October 9 appeared first on Cisco Blogs.

New Valak Variant Makes “Most Wanted Malware” List for First Time

An updated variant of the Valak malware family earned a place on a security firm’s “most wanted malware” list for the first time. Check Point revealed that an updated version of Valak ranked as the ninth most prevalent malware in its Global Threat Index for September 2020. First detected back in 2019, Valak garnered the […]… Read More

The post New Valak Variant Makes “Most Wanted Malware” List for First Time appeared first on The State of Security.

Emotet Trojan is back as the world unlocks

A threat actor named Emotet Trojan has been in the wild for more than 5 years, and now it is back after a 5 months break. It has spread globally, infecting new as well as old targets. It is re-launched with multiple Malspam Campaigns to distribute in all sectors. We…

Beating the Emotet Malware with SSL Interception

Guest post by Adrian Taylor, Regional VP of Sales for A10 Networks  

The Emotet trojan recently turned from a major cybersecurity threat to a laughingstock when its payloads were replaced by harmless animated GIFs. Taking advantage of a weakness in the way Emotet malware components were stored, white-hat hackers donned their vigilante masks and sabotaged the operations of the recently revived cyberthreat. While highly effective as well as somewhat humorous, the incident should not distract attention from two unavoidable truths. 
First, while the prank deactivated about a quarter of all Emotet malware payload downloads, the botnet remains a very real, ongoing threat and a prime vector for attacks such as ransomware. And second, relying on one-off operations by whimsical vigilantes is hardly a sustainable security strategy. To keep the remaining active Emotet botnets—and countless other cyber threats—out of their environment, organisations need to rely on more robust and reliable measures based on SSL interception (SSL inspection) and SSL decryption.

History of Emotet and the threat it presents
First identified in 2014, version one of Emotet was designed to steal bank account details by intercepting internet traffic. A short time after, a new version of the software was detected. This version, dubbed Emotet version two, came packaged with several modules, including a money transfer system, malspam module, and a banking module that targeted German and Austrian banks. Last year, we saw reports of a botnet-driven spam campaign targeting German, Polish, Italian, and English victims with craftily worded subject lines like “Payment Remittance Advice” and “Overdue Invoice.” Opening the infected Microsoft Word document initiates a macro, which in turn downloads Emotet from compromised WordPress sites.

After a relative quiet start to 2020, the Emotet trojan resurfaced suddenly with a surge of activity in mid-July. This time around, the botnet’s reign of terror took an unexpected turn when the payloads its operators had stored on – poorly secured WordPress sites – were replaced with a series of popular GIFs. Instead of being alerted of a successful cyberattack, the respective targets received nothing more alarming than an image of Blink 182, James Franco, or Hackerman.

Whilst this is all in good fun, the question remains: what if the white hats had left their masks in the drawer instead of taking on the Emotet trojan? And what about the countless other malware attacks that continue unimpeded, delivering their payloads as intended?

A view into the encryption blind spot with SSL interception (SSL inspection)
Malware attacks such as Emotet often take advantage of a fundamental flaw in internet security. To protect data, most companies routinely rely on SSL encryption or TLS encryption. This practice is highly effective for preventing spoofing, man-in-the-middle attacks, and other common exploits from compromising data security and privacy. Unfortunately, it also creates an ideal hiding place for hackers. To security devices inspecting inbound communications for threats, encrypted traffic appears as gibberish—including malware. In fact, more than half of the malware attacks seen today are using some form of encryption. As a result, the SSL encryption blind spot ends up being a major hole in the organisation’s defence strategy.

The most obvious way to address this problem would be to decrypt traffic as it arrives to enable SSL inspection before passing it along to its destination within the organisation—an approach known as SSL interception. But here too, problems arise. For one thing, some types of data are not allowed to be decrypted, such as the records of medical patients governed by privacy standards like HIPAA, making across-the-board SSL decryption unsuitable. And for any kind of traffic, SSL decryption can greatly degrade the performance of security devices while increasing network latency, bottlenecks, cost, and complexity. Multiply these impacts by the number of components in the typical enterprise security stack—DLP, antivirus, firewall, IPS, and IDS—and the problem becomes clear.

How efficient SSL inspection saves the day
With many organisations relying on distributed per-hop SSL decryption. A single SSL inspection solution can provide the best course of action by decrypting traffic across all TCP ports and advanced protocols like SSH, STARTTLS, XMPP, SMTP and POP3. Also, this solution helps provide network traffic visibility to all security devices, including inline, out-of-band and ICAP-enabled devices.

Whilst we should celebrate the work of the white hats who restrained Emotet, it is not every day that a lethal cyber threat becomes a matter of humour. But having had a good laugh at their expense, we should turn our attention to making sure that attacks like Emotet have no way to succeed in the future—without the need to count on vigilante justice - this is where SSL inspection can really save the day.

Cyber Security Roundup for May 2020

A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, April 2020.

As well reported, UK foreign exchange firm Travelex business operations were brought to a standstill after its IT systems were severely hit by the Sodinokibi ransomware at the start of the year. It was reported that
 REvil group were behind the attack and had stolen 5Gbs of customer personal data, and then demanded $6 million (£4.6m) in ransom. The Wall Street Journal reported in April 2020 that Travelex had reached a deal, paying $2.3 million (£1.84m) in Bitcoin to the cybercriminals. This sort of response incentivises future ransomware activity against all other businesses and could lead to an inflation of future cyber-extortion demands in my opinion.

Cognizant, a US large digital solutions provider and IT consultancy, was reportedly hit by the Maze ransomware.  Maze, previously known as the 'ChaCha' ransomware, like the Travelex attack, not only encrypts victim's files but steals sensitive data from the IT systems as well. Enabling the bad guys to threaten the publishing of the stolen data if the organisation cough up to their cyber-extortion demands, so the bad guys are very much rinsing and repeating lucrative attacks.

Microsoft wrote an excellent blog covering the 'motley crew' of ransomware payloads  The blog covers ransomware payloads said to be straining security operations especially in health care, Microsoft warned, urging security teams to look for signs of credential theft and lateral movement activities that herald attacks.

Researchers continue to be busy in exposing large sensitive datasets within misconfigured cloud services.  In April researchers reported 14 million Ring user details exposed in misconfigured AWS open database, fitness software Kinomap had 42 million user details exposed in another misconfigured database, and Maropost had 95 million users exposed, also in a misconfigured database.

Nintendo confirmed 160,000 of its users' accounts had been accessed, exposing PII and Nintendo store accounts. The gaming giant Nintendo said from April, its user's accounts were accessed through the Nintendo Network ID (NNID), which is primarily used for Switch gaming. The company is unaware exactly how the intrusion had occurred, saying it “seems to have been made by impersonating login to “Nintendo Network ID. “If you use the same password for your NNID and Nintendo account, your balance and registered credit card / PayPal may be illegally used at My Nintendo Store or Nintendo eShop. Please set different passwords for NNID and Nintendo account,” Nintendo said. In response to these issues the company has abolished user’s ability to log into their Nintendo account via NNID and passwords for both NNID and Nintendo accounts are being reset and the company is recommending multi-factor authentication be set up for each account.  The account breaches weren't the only cyber issue affecting Nintendo in April, it reported that a bot, dubbed 'Bird Bot' was used by a reseller to buy up Nintendo Switches before customers could make their Switch purchase from Nintendo. The bot using reseller benefits at the expense of consumers, in buying up all available Switches directly from Nintendo, they are able to sell them on for higher prices, so making a quick and easy tidy profit, due to the current high demand of Switches and lack of supply.

April was a busy month for security updates, Microsoft released security patches fixing 113 vulnerabilities on Patch Tuesday and an out-of-band patch for Teams found by researchers at CyberArk. Patch Tuesday for a quiet one for Adobe, though they released fixes for 21 critical vulnerabilities in illustrator and Bridge at the end of the month.  Oracle released a huge 397 fixes for 450 CVEs in over 100 products, which I think is a new record for a patch release!  

Sophos said it and its customers were attacked when a previously unknown SQL injection vulnerability in their physical and virtual XG Firewall units was exploited. “The attack affected systems configured with either the administration interface (HTTPS admin service) or the user portal exposed on the WAN zone. In addition, firewalls manually configured to expose a firewall service (e.g. SSL VPN) to the WAN zone that shares the same port as the admin or User Portal were also affected,Sophos said.

There were security critical patch releases for Mozilla Firefox, Chrome (twice), and for 8 Cisco products. A bunch of VMware patches for including a CVSS scored 10 (highest possible) in vCenter, a critical in vRealize Log Insight and a critical cross-site scripting vulnerability in ESXi 6.5 and 6.7. And finally, on the patch front, Intel decided to discontinue multiple products, as it was unable to keep ahead of patch their vulnerabilities.

Stay safe, safe home and watch for the scams.

BLOG
NEWS

AWARENESS, EDUCATION AND THREAT INTELLIGENCE