Category Archives: digital transformation

Global WAN optimization market forecast to reach $1.4 billion by 2025

The WAN optimization market is expected to grow from $1,047.1 million in 2020 to $1,446.2 million by 2025, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 6.7% during the forecast period of 2020-2025, according to ResearchAndMarkets. Most cloud-based applications need good bandwidth and low latency for effective utilization. In large-scale WAN deployments, latency, bandwidth constraints, and packet losses are inevitable. WAN optimization enables enterprises and service providers to save money and reduce costs with reduced … More

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23% of leading banks had an exposed database with potential data leakage

Reposify unveiled research findings of critical asset exposures and vulnerabilities in attack surfaces of the world’s leading multinational banks. Researchers measured the prevalence of exposed sensitive assets including exposed databases, remote login services, development tools and additional assets for 25 multinational banks and their 350+ subsidiaries. Banks deal with exposed database threat 23% of banks had at least one misconfigured database exposed to the internet resulting in potential data leakage issues 54% of the banks … More

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Global DX spending to grow 10.4% in 2020

Spending on the digital transformation (DX) of business practices, products, and organizations will continue at a solid pace despite the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, IDC reveals. Global spending on DX technologies and services is forecast to grow 10.4% in 2020 to $1.3 trillion. While this is notably slower than the 17.9% growth in 2019, it remains one of the few bright spots in a year characterized by dramatic reductions in overall technology spending. … More

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Huawei Analyst Summit 2020: China’s telemedicine hinges on its 5G development

As 5G deployment plods along in Canada, the next-generation wireless standard has already been adopted by healthcare practitioners in China. At the Huawei Global Analyst Summit 2020, Dr. Lu QingJun, director at China-Japan Friendship Hospital and a full-time remote healthcare practitioner, shared his thoughts on the impact of the higher quality networks on hospitals of the future.

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Lu gave a personal example by describing one of his previous remote cases at a primary care hospital. In his scenario, the patient had to wait for 25 hours to receive a consultation, due in large part to the 12GB of data that had to be sent over the network. Lu said that with 5G, that time can be cut to just “dozens of minutes”. The dataset is amplified for patients who need multiple tests, such as CT scans and electrocardiograms.

Future health care’s success will be intertwined with network quality.

When describing telemedicine, Lu precited that data, technology, and intelligence will become inseparable from healthcare. Although the course has been set, Lu also noted the perpetual battle to improve privacy and secure data transmission, all of which require new infrastructure for the intelligent hospital.

“We’ve always said that it’s not necessary to replace 4G with 5G in all cases, so we need to identify those cases where only 5G is able to support,” said Lu, noting that the introduction of technology built on 5G should not impede the efficiency of existing workflows.

The conversation then naturally leads to whether existing technologies like fibre internet could fill these roles.

“Hospitals already have fibre access, so do we actually need 5G?” Lu asked rhetorically. “You only say that because you don’t understand 5g…we need mobility, but not only that, we need to upgrade our equipment and currently our equipment is wired.”

 

During the presentation, Lu credited telemedicine in China’s battle against the COIVD-19 pandemic.

Network infrastructures will be the backbone to facilitate new communication demands. Thus, its development needs to keep pace with the ICT industry. Because telemedicine is still relatively new, the industry needs to generate new scenarios as testbeds for these newer technologies, Lu explained. These new use cases, whether they’re generated naturally by demand or synthetically, will help push along the development of these new technologies.

For example, 5G’s bandwidth massive bandwidth improvements could remove the bottleneck present in real-time communication and medical imaging. Increased bandwidth enables more immediate, higher quality remote checkups. It could also simplify the diagnostic process by enabling services like real-time remote full-body scanning, a procedure that generates large image files.

4G’s high latency, unreliableness and error rate presents challenges in realising telemedicine’s true potential. These issues could be solved by migrating to 5G.

Another factor that affects performance is latency. The ITU-R defined Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communications (URLLC) as one of 5G’s main applications. In a highly-technical and mission-critical application like healthcare, low latency is a key concern.

“The 4G technologies are not enough to meet our needs,” Lu pointed out. “In the past, we compressed the data to make it fit into the smaller pipe. And the 4G latency was not acceptable. For 5G, the latency is very low. It’s almost a real-time so the doctors can get real-time data transfer to provide better services to the patients, especially when we talk about the complex and difficult.”

He specified remote monitoring, remote analysis, remote robotics, and remote visit as crucial areas of focus. He said that while doctors understand the benefits of remote practices, vendors are not yet prepared to manufacture this equipment due to inadequate certification and qualifications.

There are more than 13,000 secondary–or specialist–hospitals in China, and adding telemedicine capabilities to them all would incur significant cost. With that said, developing remote healthcare also stimulates new business opportunities for carriers.

Moreover, Lu said that the entire network stack–the slices, transport network and edge computing could all benefit from being supported by 5G technologies. The benefit isn’t limited to telemedicine but the communication industry as a whole.

In addition, 5G could help to streamline a hospital’s logistic operations like payment. China’s mobile payment system is the most established in the world by far. In 2019, over 81 per cent of the country’s smartphone owners frequently pay through proximity mobile systems such as QR codes. But while China’s digital commerce is being developed at an explosive pace, hospitals of the future will demand more robust transaction support.

“We need to have innovation in the healthcare service provision,” said Lu. “And and we also need to have some payment assurance like basic medical insurance, commercial insurance, and also some banking services support. And that has high requirements on computing on storage and on data processing. These requirements will only be satisfied by adding new ICT technologies.”

COVID-19 is driving diverging perspectives as enterprises decide which technologies to focus on

Technology executives, C-suite leaders and senior executives in areas such as IoT, DevOps, security, and embedded development—from both the U.S. and China are realigning their focus during the COVID-19 pandemic, Wind River reveals. Seismic events can disrupt our focus and thinking and force reassessment of drivers of future business success. The current pandemic is one of those major events producing a worldwide impact, especially given its reverberations on the two largest global economies, the U.S. … More

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Strategies for successfully reopening after COVID-19

The thoughtful CIO will give priority to planning for fully reopening the organizations after the COVID-19 pandemic has subsided. The new normal in the new world will not be the old normal. The changes will go well beyond customer and staff expectations for personal safety in places of business. Successful organizations in the post COVID-19…

COVID-19 accelerates telehealth adoption

The meteoric growth in telehealth adoption during the COVID-19 pandemic is a case study in how a crisis can trigger overcoming barriers to the adoption of technology and process improvements. The issues and solutions are applicable to most information technology implementation projects. Telehealth is the use of information and communications technology to deliver health care…

Digital transformation accelerated in a post-COVID world

I’m working across more than 100 global non-profit programs pro bono and thus have deep insights of the world currently and post-COVID.  What is happening is the rapid acceleration of the 4th Industrial Revolution into Society 5.0—taking 3 years rather than 10. For example, digital integration in healthcare expected by 2030 is happening now. In…

Digital identity is coming of age in Canada in 2020

You might remember the 1993 New Yorker cartoon, where a dog at a computer says to another, “On the Internet, no one knows you’re a dog.” Decades later, that problem is about to be solved, according to a digital identity expert. Canada is making great strides forward on digital identity verification, said Franklin Garrigues, VP…

CIO Strategy Council director says its new standards needed while legislation ‘catches up’

The CIO Strategy Council published a new National Standard of Canada for third-party access to data last week, news that quickly got buried after Sidewalk Labs announced it was pulling the plug on its smart city project in Toronto.

And while the rest of the country argues over whether or not the project’s demise is good or bad for the country, the absence of such standards during the early planning stages of the project becomes increasingly evident in retrospect, according to Keith Jansa, executive director of the CIO Strategy Council.

“This is where standards become a very effective tool, because you have a consensus built across diverse interest groups, and you have that dialogue on a national level that effectively provides a high level of assurance that these minimum requirements benefit the businesses and individuals,” Jansa said.

A quick look at Waterfront Toronto’s initial request for proposal reveals next to zero mention of third-party access to people’s data or a set of standards interested applicants would have to adhere to. Meanwhile, Sidewalk Labs’ attempts to quell fears among the public when it came to protecting people’s information came in the form of an urban data trust, a concept that was eventually scrapped after pushback from privacy experts.

And while the project likely collapsed due to a number of reasons – Dan Doctoroff, Sidewalk Labs’ chief executive officer, published a blog post citing “unprecedented economic uncertainty” from the COVID-19 pandemic as the primary reason – a set of standards, such as the ones published by the CIO Strategy Council, could have helped Waterfront Toronto and Sidewalk Labs reach consensus on a number of items, including third-party access to data, much faster, Jansa explained.

“Whether you’re a public or private company, the government, a not-for-profit, the scope of these standards can be applied across all industries and across all the organizations,” he said, noting these guidelines help those organizations establish a strong baseline to combat the rising number of cyber and privacy threats.

The two standards that are currently published are around the ethical design and use of automated decision systems and third-party access to data. Another standard focusing on the data protection of digital assets was submitted to the Standards Council of Canada for approval as a National Standard of Canada on May 8, indicated Jansa on Twitter. The latest standard about third-party access to data is a 10-page document covering organizational and risk management, as well as control access and confidentiality. It got the attention of Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry, who praised the new standard in a recent statement.

Several more are planned, including standards offering organizations guidance around de-identification. It’s unclear when, if at all, these standards will eventually be reflected in future legislation or amendments to current ones, but Jansa mentioned how the standards help support Canada’s 10-principle Digital Charter. The Charter is a series of proposals that would bring federal privacy private sector legislation — the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) — close to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation.

“These standards serve as an effective mechanism as regulation and legislation catch up,” Jansa said.

The government has confirmed that it wants the Digital Charter to apply to all federal legislation and regulations. However, PIPEDA, the Competition Act, the Canada Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) and possibly the Competition Act would have to be changed.

Anyone interested in participating in the development of these standards, Jansa encourages people to contact him. The standards are formed with the help of technical committees featuring more than 100 stakeholders and experts spanning government, industry, academia and civil society groups, according to Jansa, who reinforced the notion that these standards can’t be built without a diverse group of participants engaged in the process.

“Any stakeholder can engage in the process. There’s no fee to participate,” he said.

 

Correction: A previous version of this article said the data protection of digital assets standard was submitted to the National Standards of Canada. However, the standard was submitted to the Standards Council of Canada for approval as a National Standard of Canada. IT World apologizes for the error.

Balsillie, Trecroce, Padelford added to Digital Transformation Week lineup

Three more heavy hitters in the tech industry with extensive experience in digital transformation have joined the lineup for ITWC’s  Digital Transformation Week Conference in mid-July. Jim Balsillie, a former Chairman and co-CEO of Research In Motion (BlackBerry), will offer a keynote address on July 16, the closing day of the four-day virtual conference.  Loren…