Category Archives: digital transformation

IT leaders concerned about their ability to keep up with digital transformation

IT leaders have growing concerns about their ability to keep up with digital transformation, a Dynatrace survey of 700 CIOs reveals. Traditional IT operating models with siloed teams and multiple monitoring and management solutions are proving ineffective at keeping up with cloud-native architectures. As a result, teams waste time manually combining data from disparate solutions in a reactive effort to solve challenges instead of focusing on driving innovation. Key findings 89% of CIOs say digital … More

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Does your cloud stack move faster than your cloud security solutions?

According to Gartner, worldwide end-user spending on public cloud services is forecasted to grow by 18.4% in 2021 to a total of $304.9 billion, up from $257.5 billion in 2020. “The pandemic validated the cloud’s value proposition,” said Sid Nag, research vice president at Gartner. “The ability to use on-demand, scalable cloud models to achieve cost efficiency and business continuity is providing the impetus for organizations to rapidly accelerate their digital business transformation plans.” From … More

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Companies turning to MSPs as attack vectors get more sophisticated

Research from Infrascale reveals new information security insights important to MSPs in the new year. The research survey highlights business executive input, from a security perspective, on COVID-19, on cloud adoption, and on standards compliance. As 65% of those surveyed have seen an increase in information security breaches in their industry since the pandemic began, it’s not surprising that even more, 74% of all respondents, have chosen caution and implemented new infosec technology. A robust … More

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Choosing an MSP: Cymax Group case study

This is the last in a series of three articles sponsored by Ricoh looking at how different companies facing transformation evaluate their MSP options. The variety of services MSPs provide can range from the monitoring IT networks to being responsible for all repairs, updates and patches, as well as providing new software, hardware, infrastructure, cloud…

The post Choosing an MSP: Cymax Group case study first appeared on IT World Canada.

Are you vetting your MSSPs?

Enterprises were already moving toward digital transformations at the start of 2020, but the COVID-19 pandemic suddenly threw everything into high gear. Telework, virtual meetings and a host of online transactions – from retail purchases and food ordering to interviewing and onboarding employees – went from being occasional occurrences to being the norm. With enterprises using the cloud for more and more of their operations, the adoption of “as-a-Service” offerings has grown swiftly in nearly … More

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Surmounting the challenges of COVID-19: Tips for small business

By CDW Canada As small businesses across Canada brace for the next wave of the pandemic, concerns range from operating costs for shuttered storefronts and measures to protect workers, to practical pivots and potential lockdowns. Cybersecurity isn’t always the top priority, but there are good reasons it should be. “With the pandemic propelling so many…

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Enterprises move on from legacy approaches to software development

Application development and maintenance services in the U.S. are evolving to meet changing demands from enterprises that need dynamic applications with rich user interfaces, according to a report published by Information Services Group. The report for the U.S. finds the growing ranks of companies undergoing digital transformation want to modernize their software portfolios and continuously update their applications. Meeting requirements through next-generation ADM services Service providers are meeting these requirements through next-generation ADM services, which … More

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Technicity West: What’s next for digital government?

Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson, Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman, Surrey, BC Mayor Doug McCallum,  BC’s Chief Digital Officer Jaime Boyd, Calgary CIO  Jan Bradley, and Vancouver CIO, Catherine Chick, headline the participants for the three-hour virtual event.

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Revenue for 5G enterprises in the Asia-Pacific region to reach $13.9B by 2024

Mega trends across the government and public sector, healthcare, manufacturing, and telecommunications are posing new challenges to end users in vertical industries in the Asia-Pacific region, Frost & Sullivan finds. These changes are pushing enterprises to transform and enable new use cases that are critical in supporting and optimizing enterprise business processes to improve business efficiency. In addition to impacting mega trends, the COVID-19 pandemic is driving the need for critical and vital broadband, remote … More

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Top three trends driving customer-first call centres

With repeated studies showing that customer service is more important than price when it comes to purchases, many organizations are ramping up their call centre technology to better connect with customers. Here’s a quick look at the top trends: AI and Analytics Corporate contact centres are going all-in with big data in pursuit of better…

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KNBA to open global technology centre Hub350 this year

The Kanata North Business Association (KNBA) announced today that it is opening a global technology centre for Canada’s largest tech park – Hub350 – in 2021.

Located at 350 Legget Drive, at the core of Ottawa’s special economic zone development project, KNBA says this new space will better facilitate introductions for its member companies to funding resources, research, and new talent, representing the creation of a physical community to support members and their employees, community partners and sponsors. The goal is to bring together industry, academia and finance professionals in Kanata North to further support its member companies.

Related:

Ontario’s Kanata North Business Association launches new platform to grow local tech cluster

 

Since the Ontario province is still facing restrictions due to the pandemic, Hub350 won’t be open to the public until the summer. Once the centre is fully operative, KNBA says it will implement and adhere to all the safety protocols dictated by the authorities. 

The centre will serve as the “gateway to Canada’s largest technology park”, said Jamie Petten, the president and executive director of KNBA, in a press release. “The Hub350 space will be the truest intersection of nature and technology – a trendy, natural atmosphere to attract world-class talent and companies, while showcasing Kanata North as Canada’s destination to live, work, play and learn.”

The future for the next 25 years

The Hub350 is being launched with the aim to better support KNBA’s member companies and further the Ottawa region as one of the world’s leading tech capital, says Vicki Coughey, KNBA chair. 

The new hub furthers this aim by serving as a foundation for the technology park’s special economic district designation, a concept developed and co-led by KNBA and City of Ottawa long term planning, economic development teams in support of the national capital region’s new Official Plan. The City of Ottawa’s next Official Plan will support future development across the city and within the technology park over the next 25 years, according to the press release. 

“With support from Hub350, teams like ours will be able to set up more meetings with post-secondary institutions, corporate partners and investors in the future. Having these resources available all in one collaborative and dynamic community workspace at the heart of the technology park will be invaluable,” said Tracy King, vice-president of marketing at Martello Technologies. “It’s great to see that, in many ways, we will now have a town hall for the hundreds of tech companies located in Kanata.”

Hub350 will also be the physical home of Canada’s largest aggregated tech job board Discover Technata which seeks to attract job seekers from around the world to Ottawa’s Kanata North as part of the business association’s economic recovery plan to accelerate innovation through the pandemic, according to the announcement. 

The 350 Legget location is home to the original Mitel Networks campus, and will be designed by Linebox studios, designers of the Shopify offices. The new hub will be supported by a series of Canadian and multinational enterprise sponsors, which KNBA will announce in the coming weeks.

The post KNBA to open global technology centre Hub350 this year first appeared on IT World Canada.

TELUS Health: Accelerating digital health growth and adoption in response to COVID-19

A seasoned executive with extensive knowledge in health technology, TELUS Health’s director of business development and healthcare transformation, Kathryn Seeley answered a few of our questions.

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Security incident forces firm to consider its MSP options

This is the second is a series of three articles sponsored by Ricoh looking at how real companies facing transformation evaluated their MSP options. The variety of services MSPs provide can range from the monitoring of IT networks to being responsible or all repairs, updates, and patches, as well as providing new software, hardware, infrastructure,…

The post Security incident forces firm to consider its MSP options first appeared on IT World Canada.

Six Trends Shaping the 2021 Cybersecurity Outlook

Article by Tom Kellerman, Head of Cybersecurity Strategy, Rick McElroy, Head of Security Strategy and Greg Foss, Senior Cybersecurity Strategist, VMware Carbon Black

Everything is different, and yet the same. As we look ahead to the cybersecurity landscape in the next 12 months, it is from a position no one predicted this time last year. Business operations have changed beyond recognition with most employees working from home in a transition that happened almost overnight. Stretched security teams have been challenged to rapidly deploy robust remote working facilities to maintain productivity. Most were writing the ‘pandemic playbook’ as they went along.

Ironically, one of the few certainties of the situation was that cybercriminals would take advantage of disruption to escalate campaigns. In that sense, nothing changed, except that the opportunity was suddenly much greater. As a result, nine in ten security professionals surveyed by our Threat Analysis Unit said they were facing increased attack volumes, which they attributed to the newly distributed working environment.

The effects of COVID-19 will continue to impact the cybersecurity sector for some time, but they are not the only considerations. This year we’ve seen cybercrime and cybercriminal groups continue along a path of technical and industry innovation that will see new strategies and tactics gain traction in 2021. We have also seen cyber defences tested like never before and, for the most part, they have held firm; there is reason for cybersecurity professionals to be optimistic.

With this in mind, the following are six trends we expect to see, and key areas cybersecurity professionals should keep their eyes on in 2021.

1. Remote-Working Focuses Attacker Attention on Mobile Compromise
As business becomes more mobile than ever and remote working persists, mobile devices and operating systems will be increasingly targeted. As employees use personal devices to review and share sensitive corporate information, these become an excellent point of ingress for attackers. If hackers can get into your Android or iPhone, they will then be able to island-hop into the corporate networks you access, whether by deactivating VPNs or breaking down firewalls.

We will also see hackers using malware such as Shlayer to access iOS, ultimately turning Siri into their personal listening device to eavesdrop on sensitive business communications.

Combating these risks requires a combination of new mobile device policies and infrastructure designed to facilitate continued remote working, as well as raising employee awareness of the persistent risks and the importance of digital distancing.

2. Continuing Direct Impacts on Healthcare
In terms of direct impact of COVID-19 the healthcare sector, at the heart of crisis response, will see the adaptations it made to try and maintain patient services become a vulnerability. With growing reliance on telemedicine for routine medical appointments lucrative personally identifiable information (PII) is being accessed from remote locations and as a result is more easily intercepted by hackers. At the same time, vaccine-related data pertaining to trials and formulae is some of the most sought-after intellectual property right now and the drive to get hold of it for financial or political gain is putting healthcare and biotech organisations under intense pressure from external threats and insider risk.

That said, the strain on healthcare cybersecurity is not going unheeded; we will see increased IT and security budgets in the sector to combat the growth in external threats.

3. Emerging Tactical Trends: Cloud-Jacking and Destructive ICS Attacks
As the new year dawns, we will see tried and tested tactics evolving to become more sophisticated and take advantage of changes in network architecture. Cloud-jacking through public clouds will become the island-hopping strategy of choice for cybercriminals as opportunity proliferates due to the overreliance on public clouds by the newly distributed workforce.

It won’t be only the virtual environment under threat. Increasing cyber-physical integration will tempt nation state-sponsored groups into bolder, more destructive attacks against industrial control system (ICS) environments. Critical National Infrastructure, energy and manufacturing companies will be in the crosshairs as OT threats ramp up. Our analysts are seeing new ICS-specific malware changing hands on the dark web and we are likely to see it in action in the coming year.

4. The Ransomware Economy Pivots to Extortion and Collaboration
Another familiar tactic taking on a new twist is ransomware. Ransomware groups have evolved their approach to neutralise the defensive effect of back-ups and disaster recovery by making sure they’ve exfiltrated all the data they need before the victim knows they’re under attack. Once the systems are locked attackers use the data in their possession to extort victims to pay to prevent the breach becoming public. And if that fails, they can sell the data anyway, meaning the victim is doubly damaged.

Ransomware is such big business that the leading groups are collaborating, sharing resources and infrastructure to develop more sophisticated and lucrative campaigns. Not all collaborations will be successful, however, and we’ll see groups disagreeing on the ethics of targeting vulnerable sectors such as healthcare.

5. AI Utilised for Defensive and Offensive Purposes
Technology innovation is as relevant to attackers as it is to defenders and, while artificial intelligence and machine learning have significant benefits in cybersecurity, we can expect to see adversaries continue to advance in the way AI/ML principles are used for post-exploitation activities. They’ll leverage collected information to pivot to other systems, move laterally and spread efficiently – all through automation.

The silver lining is that in 2021 defenders will begin to see significant AI/ML advancements and integrations into the security stack. Security automation will be simplified and integrated into the arsenal of more organisations – not just those with mature SOCs. As awareness of how attackers are using automation increases, we can expect defenders to fix the issue, maximising automation to spot malicious activity faster than ever before.

6. Defender Confidence is Justifiably on the Rise
To finish on a resoundingly positive note, this year we saw cyber defences placed under inconceivable strain and they flexed in response. Yes, there were vulnerabilities due to the rapidity of the switch to fully remote working, but on the whole security tools and processes are working. Defender technology is doing the job is it designed to do and that is no small feat.

The mission-critical nature of cybersecurity has never been more apparent than in 2020 as teams have risen to the challenge of uniquely difficult circumstances. In recognition of this we will see board-level support and a much healthier relationship between IT and security teams as they collaborate to simultaneously empower and safeguard users. 2020 has been the catalyst for change for which we were more than ready.