Category Archives: DDoS

Smashing Security #108: Hoaxes, Huawei and chatbots – with Mikko Hyppönen

Smashing Security #108: Hoaxes, Huawei and chatbots - with Mikko Hyppönen

The curious case of George Duke-Cohan, Huawei’s CFO finds herself in hot water, and the crazy world of mobile phone mental health apps.

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by special guests Mikko Hyppönen from F-Secure and technology journalist Geoff White.

Securing industrial control systems by closing the air gap security loophole

Air-gapping is one of the most common ways ICS are protected, however, organisations’ interpretation of how to isolate networks often varies.Security and industry experts have long advocated for the need

The post Securing industrial control systems by closing the air gap security loophole appeared first on The Cyber Security Place.

The 25th anniversary of the webcam: What did it bring us?

How did the webcam progress from a simple convenience to a worldwide security concern in 25 years?

November 2018 can be marked as the 25th anniversary of the webcam. This is a bit of an arbitrary choice, but if we consider a webcam that was installed at the University of Cambridge to keep an eye on the coffee level in the shared coffeemaker as the first one, then it’s been 25 years already. And those 25 years are measured from the moment the images were viewable over the Internet. (The images had been visible on the universities’ intranet since a few years before.)

Definition of a webcam

According to Wikipedia:

A webcam is a video camera that feeds or streams its image in real time to or through a computer to a computer network.

We deviate slightly from this definition by only considering cameras that are visible on the Internet.

The first official webcam

The first camera was actually installed in the late 1980’s so that employees could avoid walking all the way to the coffeemaker to find the pot empty, but it was made visible to the Internet in November 1993. Before that, it could only be seen on the local network. For none other than historic reasons, it is worth mentioning that this camera was in the “Trojan Room” of the Computer Science Department. The scientists used a digital camera with a video capture board and MSRPC2, a remote procedure call mechanism, to upload one frame per second.

The first commercial webcam

The first commercially produced webcam was the QuickCam by Connectix, which was marketed in 1994. It could only be used with an Apple Macintosh and recorded a whopping 15 frames per second. Nowadays, it’s hard to find a laptop that does not have a webcam installed. It has even reached the point where you can buy webcam covers to hide away from prying eyes.

band-aid

Or use a Band-Aid

Popular usage

The webcam quickly became popular when Internet speeds rose to the level that it was possible to chat face-to-face over long distances. But there are many other legitimate and popular ways to use a webcam:

  • Child or pet monitoring: Keep an eye on your loved ones when you are elsewhere.
  • Video conferences: Join a meeting that you can’t physically attend.
  • Earth cam: Watch the scenery around the world from behind your laptop.
  • Security camera or baby monitor: Be alerted when something happens at home or in the baby’s room.
  • Porn: Sell your explicit images or video feed to earn some extra cash. (Not that we recommend it…)
  • Surveillance: Keep an eye on suspects. (this can also be combined with facial recognition.)
  • Vlogging: Share information about your life or interests online via video.

Possible future uses

Some webcam developments are underway, but not quite ready to hit the stores yet:

  • Face login: similar to using your fingerprints to log on to a device. Show your face to the webcam, and if it recognizes you, it will let you in. Same as with using fingerprint readers, I’d like the device to ask for my secret password now and then—just in case a thief looks a bit like me. Windows already has Hello Face Authentication, but it requires near infrared imaging.
  • VR-like webcams: adding an extra dimension to your webcam, 3D could make your online chats even more realistic. 3D webcams are already available, but the technology to use it in person-to-person chat isn’t available yet.

Internet of Things concerns

The Internet of Things (IoT) has been a subject of our cybersecurity related concerns before, and we don’t expect those concerns to go away anytime soon. Webcams are among the top IoT problems because of their sheer numbers and their often weak security setup, such as easy-to-guess and hard-to-change default passwords.

If you want to be freaked out a little, here are some of the websites that let you take a peek through the eye of unprotected webcams:

Botnets

A botnet is a collection of centrally controlled devices and systems that accept commands from a remote administration. IoT devices, including webcams, are the stuff that the currently most powerful botnets are made of. The Mirai botnet, for example, has been responsible for some of the most effective DDoS attacks. Working for a central command has also made it possible for IoT botnets to be used in cryptomining.

Facial recognition

Facial recognition works by measuring distances between features on a face and comparing the resulting “faceprint” to a database. To get a dependable recognition rate, the tech must measure around 80 nodal points on the human face to create a faceprint and find a match.

Big Brother

The combination of publicly available security and surveillance cameras has brought Orwell’s vision of blanket surveillance to life. China is already using its massive network of closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras and facial recognition technology to track its citizens. And if naming and shaming jaywalkers is the only activity they admit to, you can rest assured that it is far from the only thing that they are keeping track of.

Camfecting

Camfecting is a term used for hacking into a webcam’s data stream. Threat actors would be able to view or store the live feed from a webcam for their own purposes. An important thing to keep in mind is that if they have hacked your webcam, they are just as easily capable of turning off any warning light that would show you whether it’s active or not. The fear of camfecting is one reason for webcam covers (or post-it notes, Band-Aids, and other sticky stuff to cover the webcam’s eye). Stolen video images can lead to sextortion and other extortion practices.

Historic overview

Looking back, in 25 years we went from watching the level of supply in a coffeepot online to the state surveillance capabilities where we can be found and identified in a matter of minutes. And where we can’t be sure who is watching us or what the devices, we are using to look at others, are doing in the background. Are they sending the same images to the manufacturer? Or to some hacker? Should we be worried about those sextortion emails?  Probably not, but that still leaves us with lots of other things to worry about.

Different types

Webcams come in many different types, shapes, and sizes. While they perform many useful and convenient tasks, we need to be aware of the dangers and concerns that come with using them. The ones that we should be worried about most are the ones that are connected directly to the internet. The ones that are connected or even built into our computers and laptops are under control by the active security solutions. The IoT devices however, especially the ones that are fitted with no or default credentials, are a major concern in the fields of privacy and cybersecurity.

Use webcams to connect with friends and family, for meetings, and to keep an eye on your inventory, but don’t allow them to be the weak link in your home or business network.

The post The 25th anniversary of the webcam: What did it bring us? appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

Why you shouldn’t be worried about UPnP port masking

Last May, security firm Imperva wrote a blog post discussing a new proof of concept for bypassing DDoS mitigation after discovering reflected network protocols appearing on non-standard network ports. Imperva was able to replicate the same behavior using a technique called UPnP Port Masking, which uses the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) Protocol to alter the source port of commonly abused network protocols in DDoS attacks. Multiple news outlets picked up on Imperva’s research and … More

The post Why you shouldn’t be worried about UPnP port masking appeared first on Help Net Security.

5 Privacy Mistakes that Leave You Vulnerable Online

By John Mason

When news broke about Cambridge Analytica, the Internet went into a frenzy: “How could Facebook do this!” “Facebook should be made accountable!” Besides the fact that I think the whole Cambridge Analytica issue was blown out of proportion, I believe bigger issue is the fact that very few people are willing to be responsible for their […]

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: 5 Privacy Mistakes that Leave You Vulnerable Online

Real-Time Fine-Tuning of the WAF via API

Real-Time Fine-Tuning of the WAF via API

Though the Sucuri Firewall is simple to set up and protects your website immediately, it’s possible to have granular control of the WAF by using an API.

For instance, there’s a specific filter inside the WAF dashboard called Emergency DDoS. This filter basically increases the strength of the DDoS protection to an “emergency” level where most non-human access is blocked.

API to Boost Firewall Protection

The Firewall API is mostly used for whitelisting and clearing the website cache.

Continue reading Real-Time Fine-Tuning of the WAF via API at Sucuri Blog.

Cloudflare Launches Android and iOS version of 1.1.1.1 DNS Service

By Waqas

Download the app and toggle on it to generate a VPN profile that will automatically reroute the DNS traffic using the 1.1.1.1 DNS servers. On April 1, 2018, Cloudflare and APNIC launched the 1.1.1.1 public DNS service to speed up the searching process for web addresses faster and more secure. It is basically a DNS […]

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Cloudflare Launches Android and iOS version of 1.1.1.1 DNS Service

Will good prevail over bad as bots battle for the internet?

By Ian Trump

This is the third in a series of blog posts “on all things Bot” – The first two posts are available here and here. From bad to good and looking towards the future, Bots remain an information security issue which has the potential to impact all commercial and recreational online activity. This series will explore […]

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Will good prevail over bad as bots battle for the internet?

Man who conducted DDoS attacks on Sony, Xbox & EA pleads guilty

By Waqas

Austin Thompson, a 23-year-old man from Utah has pleaded guilty to conducting DDoS attacks on gaming giants between 2013 to 2014. Among his targets were companies like EA Origin, Sony’s PlayStation Network, Steam, Microsoft’s Xbox, Battle.net, and League of Legends, etc. Thompson who used the Twitter handle of DerpTrolling to announce attacks on his victims pleaded guilty this […]

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Man who conducted DDoS attacks on Sony, Xbox & EA pleads guilty

Cyber Security Roundup for October 2018

Aside from Brexit, Cyber Threats and Cyber Attack accusations against Russia are very much on the centre stage of UK government's international political agenda at the moment. The government publically accused Russia's military 'GRU' intelligence service of being behind four high-profile cyber-attacks, and named 12 cyber groups it said were associated with the GRU. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said, "the GRU had waged a campaign of indiscriminate and reckless cyber strikes that served no legitimate national security interest".

UK Police firmly believe the two men who carried out the Salisbury poisoning in March 2018 worked for the GRU.

The UK National Cyber Security Centre said it had assessed "with high confidence" that the GRU was "almost certainly responsible" for the cyber-attacks, and also warned UK businesses to be on the alert for indicators of compromise by the Russian APT28 hacking group.  The NCSC said GRU hackers operated under a dozen different names, including Fancy Bear (APT28), had targetted:
  • The systems database of the Montreal-based World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada), using phishing to gain passwords. Athletes' data was later published 
  • The Democratic National Committee in 2016, when emails and chats were obtained and subsequently published online. The US authorities have already linked this to Russia.
  • Ukraine's Kyiv metro and Odessa airport, Russia's central bank, and two privately-owned Russian media outlets - Fontanka.ru and news agency Interfax - in October 2017. They used ransomware to encrypt the contents of a computer and demand payment 
  • An unnamed small UK-based TV station between July and August 2015, when multiple email accounts were accessed and content stolen

Facebook was fined the maximum amount of £500,000 under pre-GDPR data protection laws by the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) over the Cambridge Analytica Scandal. Facebook could face a new ICO fine after revealing hackers had accessed the contact details of 30 Million users due to a flaw with Facebook profiles. The ICO also revealed a 400% increase in reported Cyber Security Incidents and another report by a legal firm RPC said the average ICO fines had doubled, and to expect higher fines in the future. Heathrow Airport was fined £120,000 by the ICO in October after a staff member lost a USB stick last October containing "sensitive personal data", which was later found by a member of the public.

Notable Significant ICO Security Related Fines

Last month's British Airways website hack was worse than originally reported, as they disclosed a second attack which occurred on 5th September 2018, when the payment page had 22 lines of malicious Javascript code injected in an attack widely attributed to Magecart.  Another airline Cathay Pacific also disclosed it had suffered a major data breach that impacted 9.4 million customer's personal data and some credit card data.

Morrisons has lost a challenge to a High Court ruling which made it liable for a data breach, after an employee, since jailed for 8 years, stole and posted thousands of its employees' details online in 2014.  Morrisons said it would now appeal to the Supreme Court., if that appeal fails, those affected will be able to claim compensation for "upset and distress". 

Interesting article on Bloomberg on "How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies". However, there was a counter-narrative to the Bloomberg article on Sky News. But didn't stop Ex-Security Minister Admiral Lord West calling the Chinese when he said Chinese IT Kit 'is putting all of us at risk' if used in 5G.  He raises a valid point, given the US Commerce Department said it would restrict the export of software and technology goods from American firms to Chinese chipmaker Fujian Jinhua BT, which uses Huawei to supply parts for its network, told Sky News that it would "apply the same stringent security measures and controls to 5G when we start to roll it out, in line with continued guidance from government". Recently there have been warnings issued by the MoD and NCSC stating a Chinese espionage group known as APT10 are attacking IT suppliers to target military and intelligence information.

NCSC is seeking feedback on the latest drafts 'knowledge areas' on CyBOK, a Cyber Security body of knowledge which it is supporting along with academics and the general security industry.

Google are finally pulling the plug on Google+, after user personal data was left exposed. Google and the other three major web browser providers in the world said, in what seems like coordinated announcements, businesses must accept TLS Version 1.0 and 1.1 will no longer support after Q1 2018.

So its time to move over to the more secure TLS V1.2 or the more secure & efficient TLS V1.3.

NEWS

Cyber Security Roundup for August 2018

The largest data breach disclosed this month was by T-Mobile, the telecoms giant said there had been "unauthorised access" to potentially 2 million of their 77 million customer accounts. According to the media, a hacker took advantage of a vulnerability in a T-Mobile API (application programming interface). It was a vulnerable API used by Air Canada mobile App which was also exploited, resulting in the compromise of 20,000 Air Canada customer accounts. Air Canada promptly forced a password change to all of its 77 million customer accounts as a result, however, the airline faced criticism from security experts for advising a weak password strength. Namely, a password length of 8, made up of just characters and digits. Both of these hacks underline the importance of regularly penetration testing Apps and their supporting infrastructure, including their APIs.

Hackers stole up to 34,000 Butlin guest records, reportedly breaching the UK holiday camp firm through a phishing email. Dixons Carphone upped the estimated number of customer records breached in a hack last year from 1.2 million to 10 million, which includes 5.9 million payment cards. There was no explanation offered by Dixons to why it had taken so long to get a grip on the scale of the data breach, which was reported as occurring in July 2017.

Huawei continues to face scrutiny over the security of their products after the UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) issued a warning about using the Chinese tech manufacturing giant's devices in a security report. Huawei recently took over from Apple as the world's second largest provider of smartphones. A 16 year old Australian 'Apple fanboy' found himself in court after hacking into Apple's network.

On the international scene, Microsoft announced it had thwarted Russian data-stealing attacks against US anti-Trump conservative groups, by taking down six domains which hosted mimicked websites, which were likely to be used in future phishing campaigns. The Bank of Spain's website was taken out by a DDoS attack, and a Chinese Hotel Group's 140Gb customer database was found for sale on the dark web. The PGA golf championship was hit by a ransomware, and the FBI arrested three key members of the notorious FIN7 hacking group, the group is said to be responsible for stealing millions of credit card and customer details from businesses across the world.

On the personal front, the EC-Council confirmed my Computer Hacking Forensic Investigation (CHFI) certification had been renewed until 2021. I dropped into B-Sides Manchester this month, the highlight was a demonstration of a vulnerability found by Secarma researches, namely a PHP flaw which places CMS sites at risk of remote code execution

There was plenty of critical security patches released by the usual suspects, such as Microsoft, Cisco, and Adobe, the latter firm released several out-of-band patches during August. A critical update was released for Apache Struts (popular web server) and a reminder that Fax machines and all-in-one devices network devices could be used as a way into corporate networks by hackers.

Finally, there were a couple of interesting cybercrime articles posted on the BBC's news website this month,  Cyber-Attack! Would your firm handle it better than this? and Unpicking the Cyber-Crime Economy

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Cyber Security Roundup for March 2018

In the wake of the global political fallout over the Salisbury nerve agent attack, there are reports of a growing threat of Russian state or Russian state-affiliated hacking groups conducting cyber attack reprisals against UK organisations, government officials have directly warned bosses at electricity, gas and water firms, Whitehall departments and NHS hospitals to prepare for a state-sponsored cyber assault


Large-scale data breaches were disclosed with Under Armour’s Fitness App MyFitnessPal (1.5 million personal records compromised), Orbitz (880k payment cards at risk), and at a Walmart partner (1.3 million personal records compromised). The latter was caused when an AWS S3 bucket holding a Walmart database was left with open access, which isn't the first time a cloud service misconfiguration has caused a major data breach.

TalkTalk were warned about their website’s poor security after a hacker known as 'B' disclosed a cross-site scripting vulnerability on the talktalk.co.uk website to Sky News. TalkTalk was given a record £400,000 fine by the Information Commissioner's Office following a major website breach in October 2015, which 157,000 customer details were stolen. And the company were told to "be more diligent and more vigilant” and was fined a further £100,000 after data belonging to 21,000 customers were exposed to "rogue" staff at an Indian call centre.

GitHub survived the largest ever DDoS attack recorded thanks to Akamai DDoS protection, which peaked at a massive 1.35 terabytes of data per second.

UK schools were warned they were soft targets for cybercriminals, experts believe many schools are ill-equipped to prevent cyber thefts, with sensitive data such as children’s medical records said to be lucrative on the dark web. There has been a number of security incidents disclosed involving UK schools in recent months.
Gwent Police are facing scrutiny by the Information Commissioner's Office for not informing 450 people that hackers may have accessed their personal information, after discovering the breach over a year ago.

A hacker alleged to be behind a gang the ran the Carbanak and Cobalt bank target malware has been arrested. The gang is reported to be responsible for the theft of up to billion euros through bank transfers and from cash machines, from over 100 banks since 2013


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Weekly Cyber Risk Roundup: Record-Setting DDoS Attacks, Data Breach Costs

Last week, researchers observed a 1.35 Tbps distributed denial-of-service attack (DDOS) attack targeting GitHub. It was the largest DDoS attack ever recorded, surpassing the 1.2 Tbps attack against DNS provider Dyn in October 2016.

The attack leveraged a newly observed reflection and amplification vector known as memcached. Akamai researchers warned that other organizations experienced similar DDoS attacks using the new method following the GitHub attack and that even larger attacks may be possible in the future.

“Memcached can have both UDP and TCP listeners and requires no authentication,” the researchers wrote. “Since UDP is easily spoofable, it makes this service vulnerable to use as a reflector. Worse, memcached can have an amplification factor of over 50,000, meaning a 203 byte request results in a 100 megabyte response.”

The attack was mitigated within 10 minutes, GitHub said. The following day GitHub was the target of a second DDoS attack that disrupted availability for a 15-minute period, ThousandEyes reported.

“Because of its ability to create such massive attacks, it is likely that attackers will adopt memcached reflection as a favorite tool rapidly,” Akamai researchers wrote. “The good news is that providers can rate limit traffic from source port 11211 and prevent traffic from entering and exiting their networks, but this will take time.”

Wired reported there are approximately 100,000 memcached servers that currently have no authentication protection and can be abused by malicious attackers to carry out similar potentially massive, botnet-free DDoS attacks.

2018-03-03_ITTGroups

Other trending cybercrime events from the week include:

  • W-2 information breached: The University of Alaska said that 50 current and former employees and students had their personal information compromised when hackers gained access to their university accounts by answering security questions and resetting their passwords. The Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development is notifying employees that their W-2 information was compromised due to a spear phishing attack. Wallace Community College Selma said that current and former employees had their W-2 information compromised when an employee fell for a phishing scam. Curtis Lumber is notifying employees that their personal information was stolen in a spear phishing attack, and some of those employees have reported issues related to filing their federal taxes following the incident.
  • Ransomware infections continue: The Colorado Department of Transportation said that computers had been reinfected with ransomware eight days after an initial attack. Both the Children’s Aid Society of Oxford County and the Family and Children’s Services of Lanark, Leeds and Grenville in Canada were the victims of a ransomware infection. Jemison Internal Medicine is notifying 6,550 patients of a ransomware infection that may have compromised their personal information.
  • Payment card breaches and service disruptions: A number of Tim Hortons locations in Canada were temporarily shut down or were forced to close their drive-throughs after malware was discovered targeting Panasonic cash registers. NIS America said that customers of its online stores had their information compromised due to being redirected to a malicious site that would harvest their information during the checkout process. North 40 is notifying customers that their payment card information may have been compromised due to unauthorized access to its e-commerce website.
  • Notable data breaches: A hacker gained access to the intranet of Germany’s government and accessed confidential information. St. Peter’s Surgery and Endoscopy Center is notifying patients that their personal and medical information may have been compromised due to unauthorized access to its servers. Healthcare vendor FastHealth submitted a data breach notification regarding unauthorized access to its web server. Porsche Japan said that the information of customers was exposed due to a hack. Metro Wire Rope Corporation said that an employee email account was compromised after the employee opened a  malicious attachment with credential-stealing capabilities. The French news magazine L’Express exposed a database containing the personal information of readers and after being notified of the exposure took a month to secure the data. U.S. Marine Corps Forces Reserve may have compromised the personal information of 21,426 individuals due to sending an unencrypted email with an attachment to the wrong email distribution list.
  • Other notable events: The Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center said that one of its employees was successfully phished, and the compromised email account was used to send further phishing messages to other members, affiliates, and employees. The recent hack of the PyeongChang Winter Olympics that led to Internet disruptions and website downtime was a false-flag operation carried out by Russian military spies to make it appear as if the attack was carried out by North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials said. An Arkansas man who developed the remote-access Trojan NanoCore and marketed it on Hack Forums has been sentenced to 33 months in prison.

SurfWatch Labs collected data on many different companies tied to cybercrime over the past week. Some of the top trending targets are shown in the chart below.

2018-03-03_ITT

Cyber Risk Trends From the Past Week

2018-03-03_Risk

Equifax was back in the news this week after announcing it had discovered an additional 2.4 million U.S. consumers who were affected by its massive 2017 data breach, bringing the total number of people impacted to 147.9 million.

“This is not about newly discovered stolen data,” said Paulino do Rego Barros, Jr., Interim chief executive officer in a press release. “It’s about sifting through the previously identified stolen data, analyzing other information in our databases that was not taken by the attackers, and making connections that enabled us to identify additional individuals.”

The company also said that it expects breach-related costs to hit $275 million in 2018, which Reuters noted could make the Equifax breach the most costly hack in corporate history:

The projection, which was disclosed on a Friday morning earnings conference call, is on top of $164 million in pretax costs posted in the second half of 2017. That brings expected breach-related costs through the end of this year to $439 million, some $125 million of which Equifax said will be covered by insurance.

Those breach-related costs could rise further once legal actions from consumers and regulators are finally resolved. However, Sen. Elizabeth Warren recently stated that “Equifax is still making money off their own breach” and that even consumers who do not want to do business with them may end up buying credit protection services from another company who “very well may be using Equifax to do the back office part.”

It’s the same criticism she waged in January when introducing a bill with Sen. Mark Warner to address problems related to credit agencies collecting data without strict protections in place to secure that information. As CNET noted, if such a bill was in place at the time of the Equifax breach, the company likely would have faced a fine of at least $14.3 billion.

Cyber Security Roundup for November 2017

One of the most notable data breaches disclosed this month was by Uber, given the company attempted to cover up the breach by paying off hackers. Over a year ago the transport tech firm was said to have paid £75,000 to two hackers to delete 57 million Uber account records which they had stolen. Uber revealed around 2.7 million of the stolen records were British riders and drivers. As a UK Uber rider, this could mean me, I haven't received any notification of the data breach from Uber as yet. The stolen information included names, email addresses, and phone numbers. Uber can expect enforcement action from regulators on both sides of the pond, the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) said it had "huge concerns" about the breach and was investigating.

Jewson, Cash Converters, and Imgur all reported losing data due to hacks this month, while Equifax has reported suffering significant negative financial losses following their high profile hack of personal customer data. Equifax reported their net income had dropped by £20 million due to the hack, and their breach bill was coming in at a whopping £67 million.

November was a very busy month for security patches releases, with Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, Oracle, Cisco and Intel releasing a raft of patches to fix critical vulnerabilities. Apple even had to quickly release an emergency patch at end of November to fix a root access flaw reported in macOS High Sierra version 10.13.1. So just keep patching everything IT to ensure you and your business stays ahead of enterprising cybercriminals, the Equifax breach is a prime example of what can go wrong if system patching is neglected.

November also saw Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) finally released an updated version to its Top Ten application vulnerabilities list, which is a ‘must know’ secure coding best practice for all software developers and security testers, especially considering that Akamai reported web application attacks had increased by 69% in the third quarter of 2017. Look out for an updated OWASP Top Ten IBM DeveloperWorks Guidance from me in December to reflect the updated list.

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CoalaBot : http Ddos Bot



CoalaBot appears to be build on August Stealer code (Panel and Traffic are really alike)

I found it spread as a tasks in a Betabot and in an Andromeda spread via RIG fed by at least one HilltopAds malvertising.

2017-09-11: a witnessed infection chain to CoalaBot


A look inside :
CoalaBot: Login Screen
(August Stealer alike) 




CoalaBot: Statistics


CoalaBot: Bots


CoalaBot: Tasks
CoalaBot: Tasks


CoalaBot: New Taks (list)



CoalaBot: https get task details

CoalaBot: http post task details



CoalaBot: Settings
Here is the translated associated advert published on 2017-08-23 by a user going with nick : Discomrade.
(Thanks to Andrew Komarov and others who provided help here).
------------------------------------------
Coala Http Ddos Bot

The software focuses on L7 attacks (HTTP). Lower levels have more primitive attacks.

Attack types:
• ICMP (PING) FLOOD
• UDP FLOOD
• TCP FLOOD
• HTTP ARME
• HTTP GET *
• HTTP POST *
• HTTP SLOWLORIS *
• HTTP PULSE WAVE *

* - Supports SMART mode, i.e. bypasses Cloudflare/Blazingfast and similar services (but doesn’t bypass CAPTCHA). All types except ICMP/UDP have support for using SSL.


Binary:
• .NET 2.0 x86 (100% working capacity WIN XP - WIN 7, on later versions ОС .NET 2.0 disabled by default)
• ~100kb after obfuscation
• Auto Backup (optional)
• Low CPU load for efficient use
• Encryption of incoming/outgoing traffic
• No installation on machines from former CIS countries(RU/UA/BL/KZ/...)
• Scan time non-FUD. Contact us if you need a recommendation for a good crypting service.
• Ability to link a build to more than one gate.

Panel:
• Detailed statistics on time online/architecture/etc.
• List of bots, detailed information
• Number count of requests per second (total/for each bot)
• Creation of groups for attacks
• Auto sorting of bots by groups
• Creation of tasks, the ability to choose by group/country
• Setting an optional time for bots success rate

Other:

• Providing macros for randomization of sent data
• Support of .onion gate
• Ability to install an additional layer (BOT => LAYER => MAIN GATE)


Requirements:

• PHP 5.6 or higher
• MySQL
• Мodule for MySQLi(mysqli_nd); php-mbstring, php-json, php-mcrypt extensions

Screenshots:

• Created tasks - http://i.imgur.com/RltiDhl.png


Price:

• $300 - build and panel. Up to 3 gates for one build.
• $20 - rebuild
The price can vary depending on updates.
Escrow service is welcome.

Help with installation is no charge.
------------------------------------------

Sample:

VT link
MD5 f3862c311c67cb027a06d4272b680a3b
SHA1 0ff1584eec4fc5c72439d94e8cee922703c44049
SHA256 fd07ad13dbf9da3f7841bc0dbfd303dc18153ad36259d9c6db127b49fa01d08f

Emerging Threats rules :
2024531 || ET TROJAN MSIL/CoalaBot CnC Activity

Read More:
August in November: New Information Stealer Hits the Scene - 2016-12-07 - Proofpoint

Cyber Security Predictions for 2017

Pandalabs-summer16

Analysis

2016 kicked off with more than 20 million new samples of malware detected and neutralised by PandaLabs – an average of 227,000 per day. This figure is slightly higher than that of 2015, which saw around 225,000 per day.

Throughout 2016, we’ve seen how the number of new malware has been slightly lower than in 2015 — about 200,000 new samples of malware per day on average — however attacks have become more effective.

Cybercriminals are becoming more confident in their abilities, and, although figures have been lower than expected, there is still cause for concern. Hackers appear to be concentrating their efforts into the most profitable attacks, utilising sophisticated techniques that allow them to make quick and easy money in an efficient manner.

Black Hats have turned their focus essentially to productivity, proliferating attacks on businesses that handle massive quantities of data and sensitive information. Once they’ve gained access to these businesses, they are able to infect a large number of computers possible with ransomware, putting themselves in a position to demand millions in ransom or put the data up for sale on the black market.

If there is one thing that hasn’t changed over the course of this year, it’s the popularity of trojans, with ransomware at the forefront, continuing to top the statistical charts for years.


Ranking the top attacks of 2016

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Ransomware

We know that ransomware is a substantial business for cybercriminals, but it is incredibly tricky to measure the number of attacks reliably. What can be noted is the evolution of Ransomware attacks, in some cases having become particularly aggressive, as is the case of Petya. Instead of encrypting documents, Petya goes straight for the computer’s Master Boot Record (MBR) and makes it unserviceable until a ransom is paid.

Abuse of system tool PowerShell has risen this year, installed by default in Windows 10 and frequently used in attacks to avoid detection by security solutions installed on victims computers.

In Q2 of 2016, one of the strangest cases of Ransomware involved a company in Slovenia. The company’s head of security received an email out of Russia informing him that their network had been compromised and that they were poised to launch ransomware on all of their computers. If the company didn’t pay around €9000 in Bitcoins within 3 days. To prove that they did in fact have access to the organisations network, the hackers sent a file with a list of every device connected to the company’s internal network.

Ransomware as a Service (RaaS) presented as the latest development in the Ransomware industry. In Q3 we witnessed to a higher level of specialisation in the ransomware trade. The best example of this featured the creators of the ransomware Petya and Mischa, specialised in the development aspect of malware and its corresponding payment platforms, leaving distribution in the hands of third parties. Once the creators have done their part they leave it up to the distributors to be in charge of infecting their victims. Much like in the legal world, the distributors’ profit is derived from a percentage of the money acquired. The higher the sales, the higher the percentage that they receive.


Malicious email

Attacks don’t only come in the form of malvertising or compromised websites. A large number of them still arrive through email in the form of false invoices or other notifications. An attack of this sort was carried out in at least two European countries, in which cybercriminals posed as their respective local electricity supply companies. The message contained no attachment, showing only the billing information in text and including a link that when clicked would take you to the invoice details. The hook was an exorbitantly high payment that would entice an emotional response so that the recipient would click through to consult the supposed bill without thinking. Upon clicking the link, the user was directed to a website that resembled the company’s real website, where a bill could be downloaded. If the client downloaded and opened the file, they became infected with ransomware.


Business Email Compromise Phishing

Hackers will investigate how the company operates from the inside and get information from their victims off of social networks to give credibility to their con. The attackers then pose as the CEO or financial director of a company and request a transfer from an employee. This kind of attack is rapidly gaining in popularity.

A notable case this year affected Mattel, the well-known toy manufacturer of Barbies and Hot Wheels. A high ranking executive received a message from the recently appointed CEO soliciting a transfer of $3 million to a bank account in China. After making the transfer, he then confirmed with the CEO that it was done, who in turn was baffled, having not given such an order. They got in touch with the American authorities and with the bank, but it was too late and the money had already been transferred.

In this case they were fortunate. It was a bank holiday in China and there was enough time to alert the Chinese authorities. The account was frozen, and Mattel was able to recover their money.

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Mobile Devices

SNAP is one the most popular vulnerabilities that we’ve seen this year – affecting LG G3 mobile phones. The problem stemmed from an error in LG’s notifications app, called Smart Notice, which gives permission for the running of any JavaScript. The researchers at BugSec discovered the vulnerability and notified LG, which rapidly published an update that resolved the problem.

Gugi, an Android trojan, managed to break through Android 6’s security barriers to steal bank credentials from apps installed on the phone. To accomplish this, Gugi superimposed a screen on top of the screen of the legitimate app asking for information that would then be sent directly to the criminals without their victims’ knowledge.

In August, Apple published an urgent update of version 9.3.5 of iOS. This version resolves three zero-day vulnerabilities employed by a software spy known as Pegasus, developed by the NGO Group, an Israeli organization with products similar to those offered by Hacking Team.


Internet of Things

Connected cars are at risk from cyber-attack – investigators at the University of Birmingham showed how they had succeeded in compromising the power door lock system of every vehicle sold by the Volkswagen Group in the last twenty years. Researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, who last year demonstrated how to hack a Jeep Cherokee, took it one step further this year to show how they could manipulate at will the throttle, the brake, and even the steering wheel while the car was in gear.

Smart homes are just as vulnerable to attack – researchers Andrew Tierney and Ken Munro showed a proof of concept that they built to hijack a thermostat. After taking control of the thermostat (inserting an SD card in it), he raised the temperature to 99 degrees Fahrenheit and required a PIN to deactivate it. The thermostat connected to an IRC channel, giving the MAC address of as an identifier of every compromised device. It demanded a bitcoin in exchange for the PIN, which changed every 30 seconds.

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Cyberwarfare

2016 saw the United States go on the offensive and concede that it is launching cyber-attacks against Daesh targets. Robert Work, United States Deputy Secretary of Defense, made this clear in statements to CNN.

In February, South Korean officials discovered an attack originating from North Korea. The attack allegedly began over a year ago, its primary target being 140,000 computers belonging to organisations and government agencies, as well as defense contractors. According to police statements, more than 42,000 documents were stolen, of which 95% were related to defense, such as, for example, documents containing plans and specs for the F15 fighter jet.

At the height of the United States presidential election, one of the most significant incidents that took place was the discovery of an attack on the DNC (Democratic National Committee) in which a stockpile of data was plundered, and was then leaked to the public.

On the subject of the elections, the FBI issued an alert after detecting two attacks on electoral websites, and at least one of the attackers — identified as foreigners — was able to make off with voter registration data.

In August, a group calling itself “The Shadow Brokers” announced that it had hacked the NSA and published some of the “cyber weapons” that it had stolen, promising to sell the rest to the highest bidder.


Cybercrime

In June, a criminal dubbed “The Dark Overlord” put patient information from three US institutions up for sale on the black market. He had stolen information from over 650,000 patients and asked for around $700,000 for its return. Shortly thereafter, he put the personal information of 9.3 million clients of a medical insurance agency up for sale for 750 bitcoins.

In the last few months, Dropbox became another victim of cybercrime. It was recently revealed that the well-known file sharing service suffered an attack in 2012. The outcome: the theft of data from 68 million users.

One of the biggest attacks to date affected Yahoo – despite having taken place in 2014 the attack only become known recently. A total of 500 million accounts were compromised, becoming the greatest theft in history.

In August 2016 we saw one of the greatest bitcoin thefts in history. Bitfinex, a company that deals in the commerce and exchange of cryptocurrency, was compromised and had an equivalent of 60 million dollars in bitcoins stolen from it, money which belonged to clients that had deposited their bitcoins in this “bank”. There is still no evidence pointing to the culprits, and the company has offered no information as to how it happened, as law enforcement agencies are still investigating the case.


DDoS Attacks

In September, Brian Krebs, the famed journalist specialising in security, blew the cover off of vDOS, a “business” that offered DDoS attack services. Shortly thereafter, the people responsible, who in two years had lead 150,000 attacks and made a profit of $618,000, were arrested.

In retaliation hackers took down Krebs’s website through a crippling DDoS attack. In the end, Google, through its Project Shield, was able to protect it and the page came back online.

In the last quarter of the year, a wave of large-scale cyberattacks against the American internet provider DynDNS disrupted the service of some major global corporations’ websites. The brutal attack affected major organisations and international communications tools, such as Netflix, Twitter, Amazon, and The New York Times. Service was interrupted for almost 11 hours, affecting more than a billion clients worldwide.

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POS’s and Credit Cards

The popular American fast food chain Wendy’s saw the Points of Sale terminals at more than 1,000 of its establishments infected with malware that stole credit card information from its clients. PandaLabs discovered an attack carried out with malware known as PunkeyPOS, which was used to infect more than 200 US restaurants.

Another such attack was discovered in 2016 by PandaLabs. Once again, the victims were US restaurants, a total of 300 establishments whose POS’s had been infected with the malware PosCardStealer.


Financial Institutions

This year, the Central Bank of Bangladesh suffered an attack in which 1 billion US dollars in bank transfers were made. Fortunately, a large portion of those transfers were blocked, although the thieves had already succeeded in making off with 81 million dollars.

Shortly after that we witnessed two similar cases: one against a bank in Vietnam, another against a bank in Ecuador.

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Social Networks

The security of 117 million LinkedIn users was at risk after a list of email address and their respective passwords were published.

On Twitter, 32 million usernames and passwords were put up for sale for around $6000. The social network denied that the account information had been aquired from their servers. In fact, the passwords were in plain text and the majority of them belonged to Russian users, hinting at the possibility that they were attained by means of phishing or Trojans.

This year it came to light that MySpace was attacked. The intrusion happened in 2013, although up until May of this year it remained unknown. Usernames, passwords, and email addresses were taken, reaching up to 360 million affected accounts. A user may not have used MySpace in years, but if they are in the habit of reusing passwords, and aren’t using two-factor authentication they could be at risk.

Activating two-factor authentication, creating complex passwords and not reusing them for different websites is recommended to avoid these risks.

What cyber nightmares does 2017 have in store for us?


Ransomware

Having taken center stage in 2016, Ransomware will most likely do so again in 2017. In some ways, this kind of attack is cannibalising other more traditional ones that are based on information theft. Ransomware is a simpler and more direct way to make a profit, eliminating intermediaries and unnecessary risks.

Taking every idea into consideration


Companies

Attacks on companies will be more numerous and sophisticated. Companies are already the prime target of cybercriminals. Their information is more valuable than that of private users.

Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for weaknesses in corporate networks through which they can gain access. Once inside, they use lateral movements to access resources that contain the information they are looking for. They can also launch large-scale ransomware attacks (infecting with ransomware all available devices), in order to demand astronomical sums of money to recover the data of affected companies.


Internet of Things

Internet of Things (IoT) is fast becoming the next cybersecurity nightmare. Any kind of device connected to a network can be used as an entryway into corporate and home networks. The majority of these devices have not been designed with security strength in mind. Typically they do not receive automatic security updates, use weak passwords, reuse the same credentials in thousands of devices, and other security flaws – all of this together makes them extremely vulnerable to outside attacks.


DDoS

The final months of 2016 witnessed the most powerful DDoS attacks in history. It began in September with an attack on Brian Krebs after his having reported on the activities of an Israeli company that offered this kind of service. On the heels of that attack came another on the French company OVH (reaching 1Tbps of traffic) and another on the American company Dyn that left several major tech giants without Internet service.

These attacks were carried out by bot networks that relied on thousands of affected IoT devices (IP cameras, routers). We can be certain that 2017 will see an increase in this kind of attack, which is typically used to blackmail companies or to harm their business.


Mobile Phones

The target is clear here as well — Android devices got the worst of it. Which makes sense, given that Android has the greatest market share. Focusing on one single OS makes it easier for cybercriminals to fix a target with maximal dissemination and profitability.

To complicate matters, updates do not only depend on the rollout of what Android can do, but also depends on each hardware manufacturer’s decision of when and how to incorporate them – if at all. Given the amount of security issues that crop up every month, this situation only puts users at greater risk.


Cyberwarfare

We are living in uncertain times with regards to international relations – threats of commercial warfare, espionage, tariffs with the potential to polarise the positions of the great powers. This can no doubt have vast and serious consequences in the field of cyber-security.

Governments will want access to more information, at a time when encryption is becoming more popular) and intelligence agencies will become more interested in obtaining information that could benefit industry in their countries.

A global situation of this kind could hamper data sharing initiatives — data that large companies are already sharing in order to better protect themselves against cyber-crime, setting standards and international engagement protocols.

The post Cyber Security Predictions for 2017 appeared first on CyberSafety.co.za.

Cybercrime Surges in Q3

young man with glasses sitting in front of his computer, programming. the code he is working on (CSS) can be seen through the screen.

PandaLabs Q3 Report indicates that incidences of cybercrime continue to increase, with 18 million new malware samples captured this quarter – more than 200,000 samples daily.

The Quarter at a Glance

Cybercrime continues to grow at an exponential rate, fuelled by the opportunity for large financial rewards.

Hackers have taken to developing new variants of successful Ransomware such as Locky, and the development of a model known as Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS), whereby developers create Ransomware for distributors, these distributors then target and infect victims – allowing both parties to achieve greater profits.

Another key development was the occurrence of DDoS attacks. Most natably that of Cyber Security journalist Brian Krebs. Krebs exposure of vDoS lead to the arrest of its key members and subsequently made Krebs’ site the target of a massive DDoS attack that saw Google step in to restore the site. As one of the largest attack of its kind, hackers leveraged IoT devices to send 620GB of data per second – at its peak – to the site.
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This quarter cyber-attacks targeted multiple gaming sites, gaining access to millions of users’ personal information. These attacks were largely launched using botnets composed of smartphones, and effected users of Overwatch, World of Warcraft and Diablo 3. Further attacks saw more than 3.5 million users exposed when Dota 2 and mobile game Clash of the Kings were targeted. These highlight just a few incidences in the Gaming world in the last 3 months.

The Banking sector remained a target for hackers as attacks on ATM’s, POS terminals and Bitcoin wallets continue to become more frequent and more advanced.

A Taiwanese ATM attack this quarter indicated just how advanced cybercriminals have become when they were able to hack the banks internal network and withdraw over R28 million without even touching the ATM itself.

Another big victim was Yahoo – one of the biggest attacks of its kind revealed this quarter indicated that 500 million user accounts had been comprised in a 2014 attack.

Finally, Q3 saw the largest Bitcoin robbery to date, when R 84 billion worth of Bitcoin was stolen by hackers.

View the full PandaLabs Q3 Report for more detail on specific attacks and find out how you can protect yourself and your business from the advanc

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