Category Archives: cyber security

Facebook Plans to Build Its Own Chips For Hardware Devices

A new job opening post on Facebook suggests that the social network is forming a team to build its own hardware chips, joining other tech titans like Google, Apple, and Amazon in becoming more self-reliant. According to the post, Facebook is looking for an expert in ASIC and FPGA—two custom silicon designs to help it evaluate, develop and drive next-generation technologies within Facebook—

2018 Verizon Data Breach Report: Ransomware Most Common Malware

2018 Verizon Data Breach Report Finds That Ransomware Attacks Doubled Last Year While cryptominers are on the rise, ransomware was the most prevalent form of malware in 2017, according to the 2018 Verizon Data Breach Report, released last week. Ransomware made its first appearance in Verizon’s 2013 report, and this is the second year in… Read More

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Microsoft, Facebook and other tech giants join forces on cybersecurity

In light of increased and more sophisticated threats in the cybersecurity landscape, tech giants have vowed to get more serious about protecting their customers by working together through a new Cybersecurity Tech Accord. Thirty-four companies—including Microsoft, Oracle, HP, Facebook, Cisco, Nokia TrendMicro and others—have signed on to the...

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Intel Processors Now Allows Antivirus to Use Built-in GPUs for Malware Scanning

Global chip-maker Intel on Tuesday announced two new technologies—Threat Detection Technology (TDT) and Security Essentials—that not only offer hardware-based built-in security features across Intel processors but also improve threat detection without compromising system performance. Intel's Threat Detection Technology (TDT) offers a new set of features that leverage hardware-level telemetry

Britain’s National Cyber Security Centre Issues a Warning of a Global Campaign for the Possibility of Some Kind of Russian Activity


Britain's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) is on high caution for the likelihood of some kind of Russian movement. More people and resources have been dedicated towards the examination and investigation.

 The FBI and the US Department of Homeland Security issued a joint alarm cautioning of a global campaign with the foremost targets being internet service providers, firms running critical infrastructure, government departments and large companies.

White House cyber security co-ordinator Rob Joyce in a press conference session about the alert said that the US and its allies had "high confidence" that Russia was behind this "broad campaign".

He additionally said that, a huge number of machines coordinating information and data around the net were being targeted, as suggested by the insight gathered by the US and UK.

Despite the fact that it is conceivable that Russian intrusions might increment in the coming future, yet, it is too soon to be sure without a doubt if so. Up until this point, there has been moderately minimal indication of this in the US or UK, in spite of the fact that Russia is blamed for propelling ruinous attacks against Ukraine.

It merits saying that Britain and the US will do relatively indistinguishable activities in Russia, pre-positioning in Russian networks to have the capacity to react.

What nobody is very certain of is whether this makes an impediment somewhat like commonly assured nuclear destruction in the Cold War.
Furthermore, Mr. Joyce said that:
 “Many different organisations had come under attack for months at a time in a bid to scoop up valuable intellectual property, business information or to get at their customers and when we see malicious cyber-activity, whether Kremlin or other nation state actors, we are going to push back.

Ciaran Martin, head of the UK's NCSC, said that the issuing of the alert denoted a "significant moment" as the two forces had at no other time given joint exhortation on the most proficient method to manage attacks.

The worldwide crusade contained nitty gritty data about attack techniques, including the signs left when hardware has been compromised , and how networks arranges change when they have been broken.

Mr Martin said GCHQ, NCSC's parent association, had followed the risk postured by Russian cyber-gangs for over 20 years. Further intelligence about the attacks had been included by "multiple" cyber security associations and organizations, he added.

Nevertheless the guidance given to firms incorporates approaches to design their systems accurately and also gives an insight on how to apply patches to address hardware vulnerabilities

Bitcoin web wallet addresses generated with a flawed library are exposed to brute-force attacks

Multiple vulnerabilities in the SecureRandom() function expose Bitcoin web wallet addresses generated by the flawed library to brute-force attacks.

Old Bitcoin web wallet addresses generated in the browser or through JavaScript-based wallet apps might be affected by a cryptographic vulnerability that could be exploited b attackers to steal funds.

According to the experts, the popular  JavaScript SecureRandom() library isn’t securely random, this means that an attacker can launch brute-force attacks on private keys.

The flaw affects the JavaScript SecureRandom() function that is used for generating a random Bitcoin address and its adjacent private key, currently, it doesn’t actually.

“It will generate cryptographic keys that, despite their length, have less than 48 bits of entropy, […] so its output will have no more than 48 bits of entropy even if its seed has more than that,” said the system administrator David Gerard.

“SecureRandom() then runs the number it gets through the obsolete RC4 algorithm, which is known to be more predictable than it should be, i.e. less bits of entropy,” Gerard added. “Thus, your key is more predictable.”

Gerard concluded that all Bitcoin addresses generated using the SecureRandom() function are vulnerable to brute-force attacks.

“The conclusion seems to be that at least all wallets generated by js tools inside browsers since bitcoin exists until 2011 are impacted by the Math.random weakness if applicable to the related implementations, the Math.random or RC4 (Chrome) weakness between 2011 and 2013, and RC4 weakness for Chrome users until end of 2015” continues Gerard.

Gerard explained that several web-based or client-side wallet apps used the SecureRandom() function, the expert said that all Bitcoin addresses possibly affected are:

  • BitAddress pre-2013;
  • bitcoinjs before 2014;
  • current software that uses old repos they found on Github.

A user has thrown the same alert on the Linux Foundation mailing list:

“A significant number of past and current cryptocurrency products contain a JavaScript class named SecureRandom(), containing both entropy collection and a PRNG. The entropy collection and the RNG itself are both deficient to the degree that key material can be recovered by a third party with medium complexity.” reads the alert.

The researcher Mustafa Al-Bassam added that several old implementations for web and client-side Bitcoin wallets apps leveraged the jsbn.js cryptographic library for generating Bitcoin addresses. Unfortunately, the jsbn.js cryptographic library used the SecureRandom() function, this means that Bitcoin address private keys were exposed to attack.

“The original disclosure didn’t contain any information about the library in question, so I did some digging.added Mustafa.

“I think that the vulnerability disclosure is referring to a pre-2013 version of jsbn, a JavaScript crypto library. Before it used the CSRNG in the Web Crypto API, it tried to use nsIDOMCrypto, but incorrectly did a string comparison when checking the browser version.”

If you are using a Bitcoin wallet address generated with tools using the flawed functions you need to generate new Bitcoin address and transfer the funds to the new one.

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – Bitcoin wallet, cyber security)

The post Bitcoin web wallet addresses generated with a flawed library are exposed to brute-force attacks appeared first on Security Affairs.

Thousands of compromised websites spreading malware via fake updates

Malicious hackers have been exploiting thousands of legitimate websites since at least December 2017 in a sophisticated campaign that has disguised malware as fake software updates. Security researchers at MalwareBytes report that they have uncovered evidence of thousands of compromised websites running popular content management systems (CMS) such as SquareSpace, WordPress and Joomla. Having injected […]… Read More

The post Thousands of compromised websites spreading malware via fake updates appeared first on The State of Security.

Public services at the Caribbean island Sint Maarten shut down by a cyber attack

A cyber attack shut down the entire government infrastructure of the Caribbean island Sint Maarten. public services were interrupted.

A massive cyber attack took offline the entire government infrastructure of the Caribbean island Sint Maarten. it is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Government building remained closed after the attack.

“The Ministry of General Affairs hereby informs the public that the recovery process of the Government of Sint Maarten ICT Network is progressing steadily and will continue throughout the upcoming weekend following the cyber-attack on Monday April 2ndreported the media.  

According to the local media, The Daily Herald a cyber attack hit the country on April 2nd, the good news is that yesterday the government services were resumed with the exception of the Civil Registry Department.

Sint Maarten hacking

According to the authorities, this is the third attack in over a year, but at the time of writing, there are no public details on the assault.

“The system was hacked on Easter Monday, the third such attack in over a year. No further details about the hacking have been made public by government.
The Ministry “thanked the people of St. Maarten for their patience during this period.” continues the announcement.

Below the announcement made by the Government on Facebook.

 

The incident demonstrates the importance of a cyber strategy for any government, in this case, hacked shut down government networks but in other circumstances, they can hack into government systems to launch cyber attack against a third-party nation.

It is essential a mutual support among stated to prevent such kind of incident.

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – Sint Maarten, cyber attack)

The post Public services at the Caribbean island Sint Maarten shut down by a cyber attack appeared first on Security Affairs.

Facebook admits public data of its 2.2 billion users has been compromised

Facebook dropped another bombshell on its users by admitting that all of its 2.2 billion users should assume malicious third-party scrapers have compromised their public profile information. On Wednesday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg revealed that "malicious actors" took advantage of "Search" tools on its platform to discover the identities and collect information on most of its 2 billion

Should Companies be Fined for Poor Cyber Security?

Companies in the UK are being fined by the government for not properly securing their data. Is this a model the U.S. and other countries should adopt?

News broke recently that there would be fines of up to £17m in the UK for companies that have poor or inadequate cyber security measures in place. Specifically, if a company fails to effectively protect themselves from a cyber security attack, they could be subject to a large fine from the government as a “last resort” according to Digital Minister Matt Hancock. The U.K. also placed industry-specific regulations on essential services. Essential services industries such as water, health, energy and transportation are expected to have stronger safeguards against cyber attacks.

Cyber Security Inspections to Take Place

In order to keep companies compliant with cyber security regulations, the UK government will now have regulators inspect cyber security efforts in place. Essential services (think water, healthcare, electricity, transportation, financial) will face more scrutiny than other companies. If a regulator finds a company does not have security safeguards in place, the company will have to come up with a plan for beefing up cyber security. Fines will be brought down on companies that continue to fail at implementing the proper securities.

Cyber Attacks Becoming More Dangerous

The essential services people use every day are being targeted by cyber attacks at an increasingly high rate. This can make for extremely dangerous situations, such as the WannaCry attack that hit several National Health Service (NHS) facilities and impacted several hospitals’ abilities to admit patients. It was later found that this attack could have been prevented with proper cyber security efforts in place.  It also means that services people depend on every day — from electricity, to water, to industrial safety systems — could all be at risk.

This makes it clear why the UK government has chosen to regulate cyber security, particularly among companies who provide services they deem essential to the public. It also begs the question as to if the United States should follow suit. U.S. companies have fallen victim to their fair share of cyber attacks. These attacks have disrupted the lives of Americans who depend on the services affected or who are having sensitive information accessed by the attackers.

What Safeguards are Currently in Place?

While it is obviously in a company’s best interest to have cyber security precautions in place rather than cleaning up the mess of an attack afterwards, that doesn’t mean everyone invests as much as they should in cyber security. In the U.S. there are a few federal regulations in place to establish a bare minimum for cyber security in certain essential industries.

  • HIPAA (1996): HIPPA introduced provisions for data privacy and data security of medical information. All companies and establishments dealing with medical information must have specific cyber security measures in place.
  • Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (1999): The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act states that financial institutions in the U.S. must share what they do with customer data and information and what protections they have in place to protect customer data. Noncompliance means hefty fines for financial institutions and could lead to customers taking their business elsewhere.
  • FISMA (2002): FISMA was introduced under the Homeland Security Act as an introduction to improving electronic government services and processes. This act ultimately established guidelines for federal agencies on security standards.

Critics state that these three regulations are good for establishing minimum security, but do not go far enough. Compliance with all of these regulations have not been robust enough to safeguard against advanced cyber attacks in recent years. There have been clear breaches of cyber security measures that have occured in the medical, financial and government sectors over the past years. While some state governments have put additional regulations in place, the general consensus is that individual companies should be responsible for beefing up cyber security as they see fit.

Cyber Security Investments Should be Increased

At the end of the day, U.S. companies will need to make the decisions that are best for their businesses and customers about what level of cyber security protection is necessary. Marcus Turner, Chief Architect at Enola Labs Software, often discusses cyber security measures with his clients, stating:

“Ultimately, high levels of cyber security are a necessary and worthwhile investment for businesses that care about protecting their customers and safeguarding their businesses. I often tell businesses that they can pay an upfront cost now to protect their data, or wait until a cyber security attack and pay an even bigger price later to clean up the mess. Waiting may very well cost you your business”.

This year we are expecting a much higher investment in cyber security, so it will be interesting to see if this is enough to hinder government intervention or if additional U.S. government regulation of cyber security becomes necessary.

The post Should Companies be Fined for Poor Cyber Security? appeared first on TechWorm.

Cyber Security Lesson Brief from the Under Armour Breach

The Under Armour breach provides lessons in the do’s and don’ts of enterprise cyber security and compliance with the EU GDPR Last week, athletic apparel manufacturer Under Armour announced that its popular MyFitnessPal weight loss and fitness tracking app had been hacked, compromising 150 million accounts. The Under Armour breach is the largest data breach… Read More

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Expedia’s Orbitz Says 880,000 Payment Cards Compromised in Security Breach

Chicago-based online travel booking company Orbitz, a subsidiary of Expedia, reveals that one of its old websites has been hacked, exposing nearly 880,000 payment card numbers of the people who made purchases online. The data breach incident, which was detected earlier this month, likely took place somewhere between October 2016 and December 2017, potentially exposing customers' information

10 Tips to Improve Employee Cyber Security Compliance

Proactive Steps to Promote Employee Cyber Security Compliance Your organization’s people are your first line of defense against cyber criminals. Unfortunately, they’re also your weakest link. Insiders pose the biggest threat to cyber security in the healthcare industry, and only 13% of public sector employees “take personal responsibility for cyber security.” Here are 10 proactive… Read More

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Warning – 3 Popular VPN Services Are Leaking Your IP Address

Researchers found critical vulnerabilities in three popular VPN services that could leak users' real IP addresses and other sensitive data. VPN, or Virtual Private Network, is a great way to protect your daily online activities that work by encrypting your data and boosting security, as well as useful to obscure your actual IP address. While some choose VPN services for online anonymity and

Mac Software Mines Cryptocurrency in Exchange for Free Access to Premium Account

Nothing comes for free, especially online. Would you be okay with allowing a few paid services to mine cryptocurrencies using your system instead of paying the subscription fee? Most free websites and services often rely on advertising revenue to survive, but now there is a new way to make money—using customers’ computer to generate virtual currencies. It was found that a scheduling app,

MOSQUITO Attack Allows Air-Gapped Computers to Covertly Exchange Data

The team of security researchers—who last month demonstrated how attackers could steal data from air-gapped computers protected inside a Faraday cage—are back with its new research showing how two (or more) air-gapped PCs placed in the same room can covertly exchange data via ultrasonic waves. Air-gapped computers are believed to be the most secure setup wherein the systems remain isolated

My Conversations with Guccifer 2.0 & the Surprising Election Influence Operations

As attention turns to the cyber threats facing 2018's midterm elections, we're learning hard lessons from what went down in 2016. (Plus, what we can presumably except coming up) There were multiple aspects to my research and human intelligence operations exploring what was going on behind the scenes in 2016, but this article focuses on only one, Guccifer 2.0.

Inside a New DDoS Amplification Attack Vector via Memcached Servers

We recently saw a new DDoS amplification attack vector via memcached servers that culminated in two massive DDoS amplification attacks on February 28. Both attacks were mitigated successfully.

Here’s how memchached servers work and how the attacks unfolded.

Memcached servers

Unless updated within the last two days, memcached servers listen on UDP port 11211 by default. This can be exploited to produce DDoS amplification attacks by sending the memcached server a UDP packet with a spoofed IP containing a message asking for statistics, which will cause the server to return an enormous message to the victim. Exploitable DDoS amplification vectors allow attackers to deliver massive and/or many packets for each small packet they send, without the need to control a botnet of hacked devices. Amplification attacks via memcached servers result in an amplification factor of 9,000 X or more. As a comparison, NTP, a DDoS amplification vector known for its high amplification factor typically reaches an amplification factor of 557 X the original payload.

Credit: US-CERT, https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/alerts/TA14-017A

Total number of memcached servers globally

There are over 93,000 memcached servers listening on port 11211 all over the world, allowing attackers to choose from a variety of servers and avoid having their IP blacklisted.

Memcached servers globally, Image credit: Shodan

Memcached servers globally, Image credit: Shodan.io

The beginnings of a new attack vector

We started seeing a number of DDoS attacks using this method in the last few days.  The first attack hit the network on February 21 with another attack launching on February 26 that reached 190 Gbps and 18Mpps and lasted over an hour.

 

 

On February 28 we saw the following attacks.

memcached attack Gbps memcached attack pos

Detecting and mitigating an attack on memcached servers

Although the attack can be easily detected by setting a rule on UDP traffic coming from source port 11211, it cannot be mitigated without a dedicated DDoS mitigation solution due to the massive amounts of PPS and BPS delivered on such an attack, which are likely to turn edge routing devices unavailable before traffic arrives at the server, regardless of its configuration.

UDP stats

Imperva Incapsula Infrastructure customers are protected against all known DDoS amplification attacks, and as of now they are protected against this specific attack as well.

Digital Forensics Professional (DFP) Launch Offer

The wait is over, and we’re excited to share that our newest, 100% hands-on, online course –  Digital Forensics Professional (DFP) is here!

With its 24+ labs, 1000s of interactive slides, HD video tutorials, and much more… the DFP course will provide you with the necessary knowledge and techniques to not only investigate intrusions and prepare intrusion reports but also to assist in cases of incident response or proactive threat hunting.

 

 

Is Digital Forensics Professional for you?

This course is for all the blue-teamers who wish to sharpen their intrusion investigation skills and have fun at the same time!

At a glance, this course will teach you how to conduct digital forensics investigations and prepare intrusion reports.

More specifically, Digital Forensics Professional will train you to:

  • Acquire volatile and non-volatile data, using various techniques
  • Dive into the structure of files, analyze file headers, malicious documents, and file metadata
  • Recover corrupted disks and locate hidden data
  • Analyze both FAT & NTFS file systems
  • Create your own custom carving signatures
  • Perform thorough investigations, against Skype, Explorer’s shellbags and Windows recycle bin
  • Become proficient in forensically investigating network attacks

…and so much more.

Interested? Read more details here!

What Can DFP Bring to Your Professional Career?

Digital Forensics Professional will allow you to gain the necessary knowledge and techniques to examine intrusions.

Upon completing the DFP course, you will be able to:

  • Conduct a complete digital forensics analysis and write final investigation report
  • Locate artifacts that can be used as compelling evidence
  • Understand how disks operate and what different partitioning schemes are being used today
  • Dig down to the lower disk levels and analyze both FAT and NTSF file systems
  • Create numerous timeline analyses and network traffic
  • Analyze different Windows system artifacts, Windows Registry, and User Profiles
  • Reconstruct the activities & events performed on a system under investigation.

Get Practical Experience with DFP Launch Offers

On the occasion of the Digital Forensics Professional course launch, enroll and get 30% OFF the course fees in Barebone and Full edition with a FREE edition upgrade until February 28th, 2018. To get the discount, just use the coupon code DFP-D4A on the checkout page!

If you’re already an eLearnSecurity student please check your email for your exclusive course launch offers 🙂

[EXTRA TIP] Any enrollment into the All-Access-Pass will include the Digital Forensics Professional training course in Elite Edition at NO ADDITIONAL FEE.

* Offers are good until the end of February only!

 

Regular course fees: $1299 Regular course fees: $1499

*Launch offers are also valid in installments

 

Not Yet Convinced? Try it Out For FREE!

If you’re interested but wondering what’s more to the course, or if you’re up for it, you can try it for FREE Click here to request your demo!

We’re a proud Sponsor of InfoSec World 2018!

We’re traveling to Lake Buena Vista, Florida, for the InfoSec World 2018 conference at Disney’s Contemporary Resort! You can come say hi at Booth 207 where the eLearnSecurity team will be. 

Fun times await!

We would like to invite you to come and visit us! Come say Hi to the team on March 19 – 21 at Booth 207. If you’re interested in learning some new security hacks, we’ll tell you all about our full range of IT Security training courses, corporate training solutions, and our innovative virtual labs.

Don’t forget to bring your Passport-To-Prizes with you for your chance to win a Penetration Testing Student (PTS) course in Elite Edition!

Info…What?

For more than 20 years, security experts have made InfoSec World one of the number 1 Cyber Security conferences. To manage today’s threats, security professionals must have the skills to be both a business partner and enabler and have the technical expertise to prevent, detect and respond to security challenges. InfoSec World features a world-class program and expert speakers from the field to help you do just that.

What Can I Do There & How Can it Help My Career?

It’s simple, here’s what you’ll gain from attending InfoSec World 2018 (And So Much More…):

Get Your eLearnSecurity FORGED T-Shirt

To our students attending the InfoSec World 2018 Expo, come by Booth 207 to say hello, and grab one of our stickers.

As our student, you might even go home with one of our sought-after FORGED t-shirts 😉… and why not take a selfie for the occasion?

Can’t Make it to InfoSec but You’d Like to Level-Up your IT Skills?

In today’s crazy busy lifestyle, it’s often hard to make time for yourself. However, it’s never too late to learn new skills and get that promotion you’ve been waiting for. When you think about it, what better way than a new certification and hands-on skills to convince your boss that you’re up for it?

Learn more and level-up your professional competencies, check out our various IT Security courses for yourself!

Follow us on Social Media to stay tuned! 🙂 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn | Instagram

FINRA: Cyber Security Still a Major Threat to Broker-Dealers

Latest FINRA Examination Findings Reveal That Firms Have Made Progress with Cyber Security, but Problems Remain Cyber security remains “one of the principal operational risks facing broker-dealers,” according to the FINRA 2017 Examination Findings Report, and while progress has been made, many broker-dealer firms still have work to do to protect themselves against hackers. Firms… Read More

The post FINRA: Cyber Security Still a Major Threat to Broker-Dealers appeared first on .

Year in Review: 7 of the Worst Cyber Attacks of 2017

A look back at 7 of the worst cyber attacks of 2017 Cyber criminals upped their game this past year, launching everything from cryptocurrency thefts to international ransomware attacks. Here, we examine seven of the worst cyber attacks of 2017. The Equifax Breach Any list of the worst cyber attacks of 2017 would be remiss… Read More

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What You Need to Know About GDPR Compliance

The General Data Protection Regulation and GDPR Compliance Explained The deadline for GDPR compliance is right around the corner; is your company ready? Here’s what you need to know about this important new data protection law and what your organization must do to prepare for it. What is GDPR? The General Data Protection Regulation, or… Read More

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The good, the bad and the anomaly

This blog was originally published on LinkedIn.

The security industry is rampant with vendors peddling anomaly detection as the cure all for cyber attacks. This is grossly misleading.

The problem is that anomaly detection over-generalizes: All normal behavior is good; all anomalous behavior is bad – without considering gradations and context. With anomaly detection, the distinction between user behaviors and attacker behaviors is nebulous, even though they are fundamentally different.

What is Data Privacy and why is it an important issue?

The question of whether privacy is a fundamental right is being argued before the honorable Supreme Court of India. It is a topic to which a young India is waking up too. Privacy is often equated with Liberty, and young Indians wants adequate protection to express themselves.

Privacy according to Wikipedia is the ability of an individual or group to seclude themselves, or information about themselves, and thereby express themselves selectively. There is little contention over the fact that privacy is an essential element of Liberty and the voluntary disclosure of private information is both part of human relationships and a digitized economy.

The reason for debating data privacy is due to the inherent potential for surveillance and disclosure of electronic records which constitute privacy such as sexual orientation, medical records, credit card information, and email.

Disclosure could take place due to wrongful use and distribution of the data such as for marketing, surveillance by governments or outright data theft by cyber criminals. In each case, a cybercitizens right to disclosure specific information to specific companies or people, for a specific purpose is violated.

Citizens in western countries are legally protected through data protection regulation. There are eight principles designed to prevent unauthorized use of personal data by government, organizations and individuals

Lawfulness, Fairness & Transparency
Personal data need to be processed based on the consent given by data subjects. Companies have an obligation to tell data subjects what their personal data will be used for. Data acquired cannot be sold to other entities say marketers.
Purpose limitation
Personal data collected for one purpose should not be used for a different purpose. If data was collected to deliver an insurance service, it cannot be used to market a different product.
Data minimization
Organizations should restrict collection of personal data to only those attributes needed to achieve the purpose for which consent from the data subject has been received.
Accuracy
Data has to be collected, processed and used in a manner which ensures that it is accurate. A data subject has to right to inspect and even alter the data.
Storage limitation
Personal data should be collected for a specific purpose and not be retained for longer than necessary in relation to this purposes.
Integrity and confidentiality
Organizations that collect this data are responsible for its security against data thefts and data entry/processing errors that may alter the integrity of data.
Accountability
Organizations are accountable for the data in their possession
Cross Border Personal information
Requirements.
Personal information must be processed and stored  in secured environment which must be ensured if the data is processed outside the border of the country

It is important for cybercitizens to understand their privacy rights particularly in context of information that can be misused for financial gain or to cause reputational damage.




Disgruntled Driver asks Share Ride Cab Company OLA to Pay Ransom for Kidnapped Passenger

A doctor called a shared ride cab to drive him to the private hospital where he worked. The shared ride arrived on time, but instead of taking the doctor to his destination, the driver threatened the doctor and kidnapped him.  The OLA cab driver, in turn posted a ransom request of Rs 5 Crore (750,000 USD) to the shared ride company, even calling up the hospital were the doctor worked to pressurize the company into paying. The Delhi police, were successful after a 13 day chase to free the doctor unharmed and nab the kidnapper.

The motive for the kidnapping was to teach the shared ride company a lesson as they were miffed due to alleged nonpayment of incentives.

The incident simply highlights the damage disgruntled employees can cause, many a times due to uncontrolled emotions. While the kidnapping seems to be one of a kind, incidents caused by employees in the workplace is quite common. In the early days, it used to be sabotage of plan and machinery, but in a digital world it is the theft of IP, data or even online defamation of the company and its personnel.

Twelve Commandments that will never fail to Keep You Cyber Safe Online

As the digital world explodes with a variety of new online services, cyber threats have become more ingenuous, dangerous, and spawned multiple variants and types. As each new threat makes the headline, the accompanying set of threat specific security recommendations confuses cybercitizens. Cybercitizens want a comprehensive list of recommendations that do not change frequently.

There are twelve foundational security practices that will help keep you and your family safe. Practicing them will harden your defenses against cybercrime and also reduce the negative effects of social media use.

1)    Thou shalt not use a device with pirated software
Pirated software is not patched as it is unlicensed. Unpatched software have security vulnerabilities which can be easily exploited to steal data and credentials

2)    Thou shalt not use a device which is not set for automatic updates of Operating System patches
Automatic patching for personal devices is the best way to ensure that the latest security patches are applied and security loopholes closed before cybercriminals can get to them

3)    Thou shalt not use a device without updated antimalware (antivirus) software installed
Antimalware software reduces the probability of a malware infection (e.g. ransomware) on your device. For it to be effective to catch the latest malware variants, it has to be automatically updated with the latest updates.

4)    Thou shall not download pirated movies, games and other such material
Something free may turn out to be expensive, both financially and to your reputation. Malware is usually bundled with pirated content or applications

5)    Thou shall not use a site without trying to verify its authenticity
Authenticity of a site can be verified by the Lock Icon and accompanying digital certificate. While not fool proof, it reduces the possibility of spoofed lookalike sites designed to steal your credentials

6)    Thou shall not ignore inappropriate content on social networks, always report or dislike it
Inappropriate content influences the minds of our children as they stumble upon it online. Hate content in particular may induce biases which take a long time to reverse.

7)    Thou shalt not indulge or encourage cyber bullying online
A parent or teacher has the additional responsibility of guiding children on the right online behavior. You do not want your children to bully or be bullied

8)    Thou shalt not use passwords that can be easily guessed and promise to  keep the password a secret
Try to choose complex passwords, do not reuse them on multiple sites and always store them securely. The easiest way to get into your online accounts is by stealing your passwords

9)    Thou shalt not fall be tempted by fraudulent emails promising financial windfalls or miracle cures or cheap medicines
Try to check the authenticity of the email. Electronic communication is easily manipulated, as it is difficult to verify the authenticity of the sender. Scams like these can cost you money and affect your health.

10) Thou shall not forsake your responsibility of helping your older parents or young kids to be safe as they use the internet
Be a guide and easily available as both old and young learn to use the internet and face cyber risks. Being available, requires that you can be reached for instant advice on problems they encounter

11) Thou shalt never trust a stranger blindly online
Always be suspicious when dealing with online strangers. At any point during the relationship never let down your guard. The identity of an online person cannot be easily verified. It can however be easily manipulated. Online friends sometimes have the vilest of intention which can lead to all forms of blackmail, particularly if they have incriminating pictures and videos. Besides adults, young children are potential victims

12) Thou shalt not set a weak password for your mobile phone or keep it unlocked
A stolen phone with an easy to guess password or if unlocked, is a sure invitation into all your signed in accounts and personal data. A large number of phones are left unattended or lost each year.



Are my password freely available on the Internet? Four actions that can minimize damage

Frequently we hear of large data breaches from email, social networking, news and other types of websites which we are members off.  Many of us may have been challenged by the site owner to change our password when the site suffered a breach and would even have received a breach notification email.

It would however be useful to have a service which could tell us if our passwords were available in plain text online, anytime we wished. The good news is that a security blogger Troy Hunt has set-up a site http://haveibeenpwned.com/   Here you could enter your email id (a common login credential) and find out if the corresponding password was exposed on breached sites.  The bad news is that it covers only data breaches where the hacker has dumped the compromised list of passwords on paste sites such as PasteBin. This represent a small fraction of the passwords exposed and in all probability allowed a window of time for the hacker to gain access to your account before the breach was uncovered. It also allows anyone (friend, foe, bully, ex-partner, relative, competitor and colleague) who knows your email id to check for the password, and selectively target you.

My advice to all Cybercitizens in general but more specifically after you discover that your password has been exposed is to”

1.    Never reuse that exposed password and to never reuse password on multiple sites. A single exposure can have a cascading effect in the compromise of your online assets. If you have used the same password on multiple sites then quickly change the password on all of them.
2.    To use two factor authentication which a large majority of sites offer to limit the use of disclosed passwords
3.    To change your passwords once every 3 months to limit the exposure window. In large dumps the hacker may take time to target your account and if you have changed your password by then, you would get lucky
4.    To quickly change passwords once you are aware that there has been a breach


IQ Retail Guards Against New Age Threats with Panda Security

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“Stories of cyber-attacks hit the news almost daily – data breaches, DDos attacks, email hacks and phishing attacks – reminders of the dangers of the internet” says Jeremy Matthews Regional Manager of Panda Security Africa. “Yet somehow all of these attacks still seem foreign– as though it would never happen to you, however the reality is, South African businesses are affected by these threats” continues Matthews.

IQ Retail MD, Chris Steyn knows this all too well and has seen first-hand the dramatic rise of new age threats such as Ransomware. Software company IQ Retail, provides expertise in complete financial and business administration solutions, focusing on the development of business systems for the accounting and retail management environment. Since its inception in 1986, IQ Retail has grown to become one of the premium providers of innovative business solutions.

“Few businesses realise the seriousness of these threats and the damage they can have on a business’’, says Steyn. “ The problem we have found is twofold; firstly, businesses do not have adequate security software protecting their network, and secondly, they do not have effective backups in place”, continues Steyn.

He recognises that these advanced threats stem from a situation in which hackers no longer need to be tech savvy, with access to ready-made Malware toolkits available on the dark web. New malware variants are created daily and many security vendors are unable to keep up. As a result, businesses are being attacked more often and Cybercrime has become more profitable and easier to implement than ever before.

Speaking to Panda Security about his experience working with many South African businesses Steyn says, “We have noticed two week spikes in attacks that most often occur on the weekend when there are few people in the office. This puts businesses in a tough position that often leads to payment of the ransom or worse, a loss of company data”

Taking note of the shifting dynamic, IQ Retail developed a multi-layered approach, implementing security solutions at every level of their infrastructure, as well as ensuring backups are in place and procedures are being followed. Despite their efforts, Ransomware was still able to penetrate their network.

Advanced Protection

In order to prevent further breaches, Steyn and his team did extensive research into solutions offered by various vendors. They discovered that conventional AV solutions are unable to prevent zero-day Ransomware and other advanced threats from entering the network.
Steyn turned to Panda to implement a final effort to mitigate the threat of Ransomware. “Through our research, we realised that Panda’s Adaptive Defense 360 software is the only solution that could give us comprehensive protection. AD360 allows us to proactively manage the security on our network and track possible risk situations” says Steyn.

The Solution

Steyn explains that the current environment requires new generation protection solutions such as Adaptive Defense 360 that provide an Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) service to accurately classify all running programs on your network. This means that only legitimate programs are able to run.

Panda’s EDR technology model is based on three phases: Continuous monitoring of applications on a company’s computers and servers. Automatic analysis and correlation using machine learning on Panda’s Big Data platform in the cloud. Finally, Endpoint hardening and enforcement – blocking all suspicious or dangerous processes, with notifications to alert network administrators.

AD 360 combines EDR with full conventional Endpoint Protection (EPP) to deliver comprehensive protection.
For more information on how to protect your business from the advanced threats we see today, contact Panda Security.

The post IQ Retail Guards Against New Age Threats with Panda Security appeared first on CyberSafety.co.za.

Cerber: Analyzing a Ransomware Attack Methodology To Enable Protection

Ransomware is a common method of cyber extortion for financial gain that typically involves users being unable to interact with their files, applications or systems until a ransom is paid. Accessibility of cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin has directly contributed to this ransomware model. Based on data from FireEye Dynamic Threat Intelligence (DTI), ransomware activities have been rising fairly steadily since mid-2015.

On June 10, 2016, FireEye’s HX detected a Cerber ransomware campaign involving the distribution of emails with a malicious Microsoft Word document attached. If a recipient were to open the document a malicious macro would contact an attacker-controlled website to download and install the Cerber family of ransomware.

Exploit Guard, a major new feature of FireEye Endpoint Security (HX), detected the threat and alerted HX customers on infections in the field so that organizations could inhibit the deployment of Cerber ransomware. After investigating further, the FireEye research team worked with security agency CERT-Netherlands, as well as web hosting providers who unknowingly hosted the Cerber installer, and were able to shut down that instance of the Cerber command and control (C2) within hours of detecting the activity. With the attacker-controlled servers offline, macros and other malicious payloads configured to download are incapable of infecting users with ransomware.

FireEye hasn’t seen any additional infections from this attacker since shutting down the C2 server, although the attacker could configure one or more additional C2 servers and resume the campaign at any time. This particular campaign was observed on six unique endpoints from three different FireEye endpoint security customers. HX has proven effective at detecting and inhibiting the success of Cerber malware.

Attack Process

The Cerber ransomware attack cycle we observed can be broadly broken down into eight steps:

  1. Target receives and opens a Word document.
  2. Macro in document is invoked to run PowerShell in hidden mode.
  3. Control is passed to PowerShell, which connects to a malicious site to download the ransomware.
  4. On successful connection, the ransomware is written to the disk of the victim.
  5. PowerShell executes the ransomware.
  6. The malware configures multiple concurrent persistence mechanisms by creating command processor, screensaver, startup.run and runonce registry entries.
  7. The executable uses native Windows utilities such as WMIC and/or VSSAdmin to delete backups and shadow copies.
  8. Files are encrypted and messages are presented to the user requesting payment.

Rather than waiting for the payload to be downloaded or started around stage four or five of the aforementioned attack cycle, Exploit Guard provides coverage for most steps of the attack cycle – beginning in this case at the second step.

The most common way to deliver ransomware is via Word documents with embedded macros or a Microsoft Office exploit. FireEye Exploit Guard detects both of these attacks at the initial stage of the attack cycle.

PowerShell Abuse

When the victim opens the attached Word document, the malicious macro writes a small piece of VBScript into memory and executes it. This VBScript executes PowerShell to connect to an attacker-controlled server and download the ransomware (profilest.exe), as seen in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Launch sequence of Cerber – the macro is responsible for invoking PowerShell and PowerShell downloads and runs the malware

It has been increasingly common for threat actors to use malicious macros to infect users because the majority of organizations permit macros to run from Internet-sourced office documents.

In this case we observed the macrocode calling PowerShell to bypass execution policies – and run in hidden as well as encrypted mode – with the intention that PowerShell would download the ransomware and execute it without the knowledge of the victim.

Further investigation of the link and executable showed that every few seconds the malware hash changed with a more current compilation timestamp and different appended data bytes – a technique often used to evade hash-based detection.

Cerber in Action

Initial payload behavior

Upon execution, the Cerber malware will check to see where it is being launched from. Unless it is being launched from a specific location (%APPDATA%\&#60GUID&#62), it creates a copy of itself in the victim's %APPDATA% folder under a filename chosen randomly and obtained from the %WINDIR%\system32 folder.

If the malware is launched from the specific aforementioned folder and after eliminating any blacklisted filenames from an internal list, then the malware creates a renamed copy of itself to “%APPDATA%\&#60GUID&#62” using a pseudo-randomly selected name from the “system32” directory. The malware executes the malware from the new location and then cleans up after itself.

Shadow deletion

As with many other ransomware families, Cerber will bypass UAC checks, delete any volume shadow copies and disable safe boot options. Cerber accomplished this by launching the following processes using respective arguments:

Vssadmin.exe "delete shadows /all /quiet"

WMIC.exe "shadowcopy delete"

Bcdedit.exe "/set {default} recoveryenabled no"

Bcdedit.exe "/set {default} bootstatuspolicy ignoreallfailures

Coercion

People may wonder why victims pay the ransom to the threat actors. In some cases it is as simple as needing to get files back, but in other instances a victim may feel coerced or even intimidated. We noticed these tactics being used in this campaign, where the victim is shown the message in Figure 2 upon being infected with Cerber.

Figure 2. A message to the victim after encryption

The ransomware authors attempt to incentivize the victim into paying quickly by providing a 50 percent discount if the ransom is paid within a certain timeframe, as seen in Figure 3.

 

 

Figure 3. Ransom offered to victim, which is discounted for five days

Multilingual Support

As seen in Figure 4, the Cerber ransomware presented its message and instructions in 12 different languages, indicating this attack was on a global scale.

Figure 4.   Interface provided to the victim to pay ransom supports 12 languages

Encryption

Cerber targets 294 different file extensions for encryption, including .doc (typically Microsoft Word documents), .ppt (generally Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows), .jpg and other images. It also targets financial file formats such as. ibank (used with certain personal finance management software) and .wallet (used for Bitcoin).

Selective Targeting

Selective targeting was used in this campaign. The attackers were observed checking the country code of a host machine’s public IP address against a list of blacklisted countries in the JSON configuration, utilizing online services such as ipinfo.io to verify the information. Blacklisted (protected) countries include: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Russia, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.

The attack also checked a system's keyboard layout to further ensure it avoided infecting machines in the attackers geography: 1049—Russian, ¨ 1058—Ukrainian, 1059—Belarusian, 1064—Tajik, 1067—Armenian, 1068—Azeri, (Latin), 1079—Georgian, 1087—Kazakh, 1088—Kyrgyz (Cyrillic), 1090—Turkmen, 1091—Uzbek (Latin), 2072—Romanian (Moldova), 2073—Russian (Moldova), 2092—Azeri (Cyrillic), 2115—Uzbek (Cyrillic).

Selective targeting has historically been used to keep malware from infecting endpoints within the author’s geographical region, thus protecting them from the wrath of local authorities. The actor also controls their exposure using this technique. In this case, there is reason to suspect the attackers are based in Russia or the surrounding region.

Anti VM Checks

The malware searches for a series of hooked modules, specific filenames and paths, and known sandbox volume serial numbers, including: sbiedll.dll, dir_watch.dll, api_log.dll, dbghelp.dll, Frz_State, C:\popupkiller.exe, C:\stimulator.exe, C:\TOOLS\execute.exe, \sand-box\, \cwsandbox\, \sandbox\, 0CD1A40, 6CBBC508, 774E1682, 837F873E, 8B6F64BC.

Aside from the aforementioned checks and blacklisting, there is also a wait option built in where the payload will delay execution on an infected machine before it launches an encryption routine. This technique was likely implemented to further avoid detection within sandbox environments.

Persistence

Once executed, Cerber deploys the following persistence techniques to make sure a system remains infected:

  • A registry key is added to launch the malware instead of the screensaver when the system becomes idle.
  • The “CommandProcessor” Autorun keyvalue is changed to point to the Cerber payload so that the malware will be launched each time the Windows terminal, “cmd.exe”, is launched.
  • A shortcut (.lnk) file is added to the startup folder. This file references the ransomware and Windows will execute the file immediately after the infected user logs in.
  • Common persistence methods such as run and runonce key are also used.
A Solid Defense

Mitigating ransomware malware has become a high priority for affected organizations because passive security technologies such as signature-based containment have proven ineffective.

Malware authors have demonstrated an ability to outpace most endpoint controls by compiling multiple variations of their malware with minor binary differences. By using alternative packers and compilers, authors are increasing the level of effort for researchers and reverse-engineers. Unfortunately, those efforts don’t scale.

Disabling support for macros in documents from the Internet and increasing user awareness are two ways to reduce the likelihood of infection. If you can, consider blocking connections to websites you haven’t explicitly whitelisted. However, these controls may not be sufficient to prevent all infections or they may not be possible based on your organization.

FireEye Endpoint Security with Exploit Guard helps to detect exploits and techniques used by ransomware attacks (and other threat activity) during execution and provides analysts with greater visibility. This helps your security team conduct more detailed investigations of broader categories of threats. This information enables your organization to quickly stop threats and adapt defenses as needed.

Conclusion

Ransomware has become an increasingly common and effective attack affecting enterprises, impacting productivity and preventing users from accessing files and data.

Mitigating the threat of ransomware requires strong endpoint controls, and may include technologies that allow security personnel to quickly analyze multiple systems and correlate events to identify and respond to threats.

HX with Exploit Guard uses behavioral intelligence to accelerate this process, quickly analyzing endpoints within your enterprise and alerting your team so they can conduct an investigation and scope the compromise in real-time.

Traditional defenses don’t have the granular view required to do this, nor can they connect the dots of discreet individual processes that may be steps in an attack. This takes behavioral intelligence that is able to quickly analyze a wide array of processes and alert on them so analysts and security teams can conduct a complete investigation into what has, or is, transpiring. This can only be done if those professionals have the right tools and the visibility into all endpoint activity to effectively find every aspect of a threat and deal with it, all in real-time. Also, at FireEye, we go one step ahead and contact relevant authorities to bring down these types of campaigns.

Click here for more information about Exploit Guard technology.

Cyber Risks in a “Connected World” can take human lives and cause physical damage

I believe that the cyber risks are always grossly underestimated or trivialized. Over the last few years due to the rapid digitization of businesses, there has been a growing spate of cyber-attacks the world over. New start-ups offer a panacea of digitized solutions through cloud platforms. With limited budgets and a focus on perfecting their business model, companies need to navigate the tradeoff between the portions of their financial capital that goes into product security as against growing the business.

The next phase of digital evolution is themed “connected” – connected cars, connected homes, and connected humans (with intelligent body parts like wireless enabled pacemakers). As businesses race to bring new connected products or to make intelligent existing products using internet enabled sensors, wireless, cloud management and mobile apps, they still seem to not realize the criticality of fool proofing these systems against cyber threats.

The risks have now extended beyond purely financial and reputation losses to threats which affect human lives.  As the world digitizes, cyber threats that damage property, cause physical harm and even kill will materialize at a scale that is virtually impossible to contain.

An early indication is the recent recall of 1.4m vehicles by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, the world's seventh largest automaker, to fix a vulnerability that allowed hackers to use the cellular network to electronically control vital functions.Functions, which when manipulated could shut the engine down while it was being driven down the highway, take control of the steering wheel and disable the brakes. Similar threats would materialize if hackers were able to find flaws in a wireless pacemakers or other such devices.

The core issue is twofold. Firstly as the connected world becomes individualized,  malicious hackers would find and exploit flaws in products used by individuals or organizations they target. Remotely engineered assassinations may just become a reality.

The second and more dangerous consequence, is of terrorist organizations utilizing vulnerabilities that affect products used by many, cars for example, to launch mass attacks which would instantly cause more damage and widespread chaos, than detonating explosives. Such remote attacks from the Internet will bypass all conventional border security measures.

In a digitized world, cybersecurity and safety become intrinsically linked and as new standards slowly evolve, an immediate concerted attempt must be made by companies to build secure products to protect naïve cyber citizens against all sort of risks.


For a cybercitizen, security should be under the hood, so as to speak. Cybercitizens are unable to determine the extent to which these products are safe to use. Besides building safe products, systems to securely and instantly plug vulnerabilities will need to be perfected.

New Tactics. New Motives. New Services.

Every day at Mandiant we respond to some of the largest cyber security incidents around the world. This gives us a front-row seat to witness what works (and what doesn't) when it comes to finding attackers and preventing them from stealing our clients' data.

Attackers' tactics and motives are evolving and as a result our security strategies also need to adapt. Today, we announced two new service offerings that will further help our clients improve their protective, detective, and responsive security controls and leverage Mandiant's extensive experience responding to some of the most serious cyber security incidents.

Our first new service offering addresses attackers' expanding motives. We are starting to see attackers with destructive motives and what could be more damaging than attacking a nation's critical infrastructure. Security incidents at critical infrastructure such as electric power grids, utilities and manufacturing companies can affect the lives of hundreds of thousands of people. Our new Industrial Control Systems (ICS) Security Gap Assessment is specifically focused on helping these industries - and others that use SCADA systems - to assess their existing security processes for industrial control systems. The service helps identify security GAPs and provides specific recommendations to close those GAPs and safeguard critical infrastructure.

Our second new service offering is designed to help organizations address the challenges they face as they build out their own internal security operations program and incident response teams. Many organizations want to enhance their internal capabilities beyond the traditional security operations centers (SOCs). Our new Cyber Defense Center Development service helps organizations evolve their internal SOC by improving the visibility (monitoring and detection) and response capabilities (incident response) necessary to defend against advanced threats. This service looks at existing people, process, and technologies and identifies areas for improvement. It helps companies to identify and prioritize the alerts that require the most immediate action with the goal to reduce the mean time to remediation.

If either of these new services sound like something that could help your organization let us know.

Cyber Security Is A Critical Element In The Modern Business World

In today's business world, nearly everyone is connected to the internet in some way, shape or form.  It's virtually unavoidable.  Businesses conduct majority of their operations online and through electronic mediums. Whether you walk into a store and make a purchase with a credit card or decide to engage in an online transaction between two businesses, information is being stored, moved and analyzed via electronics. 
Someone has the ability to access this kind of data somewhere, whether it is a company that handles your credit card information or a medical office that has your social security number. At one point or another, all data is accessible which means that cyber security is a critical element to every company's success. 
                How does your business prepare against attacks? Do you have a plan of action to defend against hackers and criminals that seek to undermine your security and steal valuable information? The network security of your business is the lifeblood, and if it is at risk, the entire network is susceptible.  If technology is not something that you understand thoroughly or have had much experience with then investing in security consultants could be one of the best choices that you could make. 
                Companies of all sizes evaluate their risk analysis and probe their defenses for weak spots. The best way to make sure that your company has the ability to successfully defend against a cyber-attack is to get an individual or organization in there that is completely familiar with protecting companies against these types of threats.  Whether it is an IT risk assessment that you need or you have to conduct a penetration test of your network, Secure Anchor can help meet and exceed your cyber-security needs.

With New Cyber Terror Threats, Investing In Cyber Security Is More Important Than Ever


In our times, network security is the most critical aspect and function of any business; almost all business are connected to online data in some way.  Even smaller companies such as small music store chains have specific email passwords and critical data that can be easily hacked by criminals.  To avoid these types of issues and to eliminate the chances of such security breaches, computer network security should be your number one priority.  There are criminals out there unlike what the world has previously witnessed; these are not people who wait to break in to your business at night.  The modern criminal is rapidly becoming a cyber threat; unseen, unheard and many times unstoppable to those who do not have proper cyber security.
                The threat is growing across the world as well; enemies of America and other countries throughout the world are rapidly planning more cyber-attacks than ever before.  Federal institutions have had their websites targeted and taken over by terror organizations, and the threat continues to grow.  It is only a matter of time before terrorist cells will see the harm they can cause by targeting the websites of average, everyday business, and conduct terror opportunities through the internet and cyberspace.  Network security should be more important than ever to every business owner; why take the risk of losing the trust of your customers and employees?  Protect your business from the unseen threats in the world, just as you would protect it from physical threats.

The Importance of Cyber Security


Cyber security is crucial to any major business, for many different reasons. We are here to provide the highest quality cyber security. To give a background on cyber security, the United States Department of National Security defines cyber security as, “preventing, detecting, and responding to attacks.” We have a staff of cyber security experts, who can handle all three of those aspects.
    Without cyber security, your network is at high risk. For starters, without cyber security a virus can completely erase any and all data, from your network.  Also, a hacker can easily invade your network, without the proper cyber security service. This means, they can alter your private information, steal your credit card numbers, or even take the private information of your customers. Once skilled hackers have this information, they can cause serious financial damage. Our cyber security services ensure your valuable information stays protected.
    Our cyber security team customizes cyber security to fit the needs of your company. Just like people, no two businesses are the same. We will take in all of your information and set up the perfect cyber security plan. One of the greatest features to our cyber security service is a penetration test. A penetration test shows exactly how vulnerable your network is. The penetration test simulates hackers, trying to steal your valuable information. Our cyber security service can take the information from a penetration test and know the exact parts of your network, which need higher cyber security.
    Our cyber security services have been trusted by Fortune 500 companies, as well as, the military and legal industries. Just to name a few. We have the cyber security experience needed to be a leader in the cyber security field.  When your company needs the highest quality cyber security, our cyber security specialists are happy to help.