Category Archives: Cloud Adoption

What is driving organizations’ cloud adoption?

Cloud adoption is gaining momentum, as 36 percent of organizations are currently in the process of migrating to the cloud while close to 20 percent consider themselves to be in the advanced stages of implementation, according to the second annual cloud usage survey by data virtualization company Denodo. Due to the number of ways data is stored and the amount of time it takes to migrate these sources to the cloud, hybrid cloud is the … More

The post What is driving organizations’ cloud adoption? appeared first on Help Net Security.

Is Cloud Business Moving too Fast for Cloud Security?

As more companies migrate to the cloud and expand their cloud environments, security has become an enormous challenge. Many of the issues stem from the reality that the speed of cloud migration far surpasses security’s ability to keep pace.

What’s the holdup when it comes to security? While there’s no single answer to that complicated question, there are many obstacles that are seemingly blocking the path to cloud security.

In its inaugural “State of Hybrid Cloud Security” report, FireMon asserted that not only are cloud business and security misaligned, but existing security tools can’t handle the scale of cloud adoption or the complexity of cloud environments. A lack of security budget and resources compounds these concerns.

What Are the Risks of Fast-Paced Cloud Adoption?

Of the 400 information security professionals who participated in the survey, 60 percent either agreed or strongly agreed that cloud-based business initiatives move faster than the security organization’s ability to secure them. Another telling finding from a press release associated with the report is that 44 percent of respondents said that people outside of the security organization are responsible for securing the cloud. That means IT and cloud teams, application owners and other teams are tasked with securing cloud environments.

Perhaps it’s coincidental, but 44.5 percent of respondents also said that their top three challenges in securing public cloud environments are lack of visibility, lack of training and lack of control.

“Because the cloud is a shared security model, traditional approaches to security aren’t working reliably,” said Carolyn Crandall, chief deception officer at Attivo Networks. “Limited visibility leads to major gaps in detection where an attacker can hijack cloud resources or steal critical information.”

While the emergence of the cloud has enabled anytime, anywhere access to IT resources at an economical cost for businesses, cloud computing also widens the network attack surface, creating new entry points for adversaries to exploit.

The Misery of Misconfiguration

As cloud-based businesses continue to quickly spin up new environments, misconfiguration issues have resulted in security nightmares, particularly over the last several months. According to Infosecurity Magazine, a misconfiguration at a California-based communications provider left 26 million SMS messages exposed in November 2018, and in December 2018, IT misconfigurations exposed the data of more than 120 million Brazilians.

From Amazon Web Services (AWS) bucket misconfigurations to Elasticsearch or MongoDB blunders, companies across all sectors have had their names in headlines not because of a data breach, but because human error left plaintext sensitive data exposed, often without a password.

Getting Cloud Security up to Speed

As is most often the case, the ability to enhance cloud security comes down to the availability of resources — 57.5 percent of respondents to the FireMon survey said that less than 25 percent of the security budget is dedicated to cloud security.

It’s also time to move beyond the misconception that cloud providers are delivering security in the cloud.

“Organizations new to the cloud will typically think that the cloud provider handles security for them, so they are already covered. This is not true; the AWS Shared Security Model says that while AWS handles security of the cloud, the customer is still responsible for handling security in the cloud. Azure’s policy is similar,” said Nitzan Miron, vice president of product management, application security services at Barracuda.

In short, securing all the applications and databases running in cloud environments is the responsibility of the business. That’s why organizations need to start thinking differently about their security frameworks and how to design controls that will secure a complex, borderless environment. Within that evolving security framework, organizations not only need strategies for scalable threat detection across cloud environments, but the endpoints accessing those cloud environments also need to be able to detect threats.

“Reducing risk will require adding capabilities to monitor user activity in the cloud, unauthorized access, as well as any malware infiltration. They will also need to add continuous assessment controls to address policy violations, misconfigurations, or misconduct by their suppliers and contractors,” Crandall said.

DevSecOps to the Rescue?

Another reason cloud security is lagging is rooted in the highly problematic division of teams. According to Miron, it’s often the case that security teams are separate from Ops/DevOps teams, which causes security to move much slower.

When the DevOps team decides to move to the cloud, it may be months before the security team gets involved to audit what they are doing.

“The long-term solution to this is DevSecOps,” said Miron.

Let it not be lost on anyone that “Sec” is supplanted right between “Dev” and “Ops.” When it comes to development, security is not something that can be tacked on at the end. It has to be central to the DevOps process.

From database exposure to application vulnerabilities, security in the cloud is complicated; and the complexities are compounded when teams don’t have adequate resources. Businesses that want to advance cloud security at scale need to invest in both the people and the technology that will reduce risks.

The post Is Cloud Business Moving too Fast for Cloud Security? appeared first on Security Intelligence.

Clouded Vision: How A Lack Of Visibility Drives Cloud Security Risk

Enterprises continue to migrate to the cloud with many using their cloud environments to support mission critical applications. According to RightScale, enterprises are on average running 38 percent of their workloads

The post Clouded Vision: How A Lack Of Visibility Drives Cloud Security Risk appeared first on The Cyber Security Place.

Financial sector recognizes the benefits of hybrid cloud but still struggles to enable IT transformation

The financial sector outpaces other industries in the adoption of hybrid cloud, with the deployment of hybrid cloud reaching 21% penetration today, compared to the global average of 18.5%. Financial services firms today are facing mounting competitive pressure to streamline operations while delivering a differentiated experience to their customers, including leveraging new technologies such as blockchain. This FinTech revolution, combined with the growing burdens of regulatory compliance, data privacy, and security issues are pushing CIOs … More

The post Financial sector recognizes the benefits of hybrid cloud but still struggles to enable IT transformation appeared first on Help Net Security.

Security and privacy still the top inhibitors of cloud adoption

Cloud adoption is gaining momentum, as 36 percent of organizations are currently in the process of migrating to the cloud while close to 20 percent consider themselves to be in the advanced stages of implementation. Top cloud challenges Due to the number of ways data is stored and the amount of time it takes to migrate these sources to the cloud, hybrid cloud is the most common and popular architecture (46 percent) followed by private … More

The post Security and privacy still the top inhibitors of cloud adoption appeared first on Help Net Security.

Moving from traditional on-premise solutions to cloud-based security

In this Help Net Security podcast recorded at RSA Conference 2019, Gary Marsden, Senior Director, Data Protection Services at Gemalto, talks about the feedback they’re getting from the market and how Gemalto

The post Moving from traditional on-premise solutions to cloud-based security appeared first on The Cyber Security Place.

Security Considerations for Whatever Cloud Service Model You Adopt

Companies recognize the strategic importance of adopting a cloud service model to transform their operations, but there still needs to be a focus on mitigating potential information risks with appropriate cloud security considerations, controls and requirements without compromising functionality, ease of use or the pace of adoption. We all worry about security in our business and personal lives, so it’s naturally a persistent concern when adopting cloud-based services — and understandably so. However, research suggests that cloud services are now a mainstream way of delivering IT requirements for many companies today and will continue to grow in spite of any unease about security.

According to Gartner, 28 percent of spending within key enterprise IT markets will shift to the cloud by 2022, which is up from 19 percent in 2018. Meanwhile, Forrester reported that cloud platforms and applications now drive the full spectrum of end-to-end business technology transformations in leading enterprises, from the key systems powering the back office to mobile apps delivering new customer experiences. More enterprises are using multiple cloud services each year, including software-as-a-service (SaaS) business apps and cloud platforms such as infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) and platform-as-a-service (PaaS), both on-premises and from public service providers.

What Is Your Cloud Security Readiness Posture?

The state of security readiness for cloud service adoption varies between companies, but many still lack the oversight and decision-making processes necessary for such a migration. There is a greater need for alignment and governance processes to manage and oversee a cloud vendor relationship. This represents a shift in responsibilities, so companies need to adequately staff, manage and maintain the appropriate level of oversight and control over the cloud service. As a result, a security governance and management model is essential for cloud services that can be found in a cloud vendor risk management program.

A cloud vendor risk management program requires careful consideration and implementation, but not a complete overhaul of your company’s entire cybersecurity program. The activities in the cloud vendor risk management program are intended to assist companies in approaching security in a consistent manner, regardless of how varied or unique the cloud service may be. The use of standard methods helps ensure there is reliable information on which to base decisions and actions. It also reinforces the ability to proactively evaluate and mitigate the risks cloud vendors introduce to the business. Finally, standard cloud vendor risk management methods can help distinguish between different types of risks and manage them appropriately.

Overlooked Security Considerations for Your Cloud Service Model

A cloud vendor risk management program provides a tailored set of security considerations, controls and requirements within a cloud computing environment through a phased life cycle approach. Determining cloud security considerations, controls and requirements is an ongoing analytical activity to evaluate the cloud service models and potential cloud vendors that can satisfy existing or emerging business needs.

All cloud security controls and requirements possess a certain level of importance based on risk, and most are applicable regardless of the cloud service. However, some elements are overlooked more often than others, and companies should pay particular attention to the following considerations to protect their cloud service model and the data therein.

Application Security

  • Application exposure: Consider the cloud vendor application’s overall attack surface. In a SaaS cloud environment, the applications offered by the cloud vendor often have broader exposure, which increases the attack surface. Additionally, those applications often still need to integrate back to other noncloud applications within the boundaries of your company or the cloud vendor enterprise.
  • Application mapping: Ensure that applications are aligned with the capabilities provided by cloud vendors to avoid the introduction of any undesirable features or vulnerabilities.
  • Application design: Pay close attention to the design and requirements of an application candidate and request a test period from the cloud vendor to rule out any possible issues. Require continuous communication and notification of major changes to ensure that compatibility testing is included in the change plans. SaaS cloud vendors will typically introduce additional features to improve the resilience of their software, such as security testing or strict versioning. Cloud vendors can also inform your company about the exact state of its business applications, such as specific software logging and monitoring, given their dedicated attention to managing reputation risk and reliance on providing secure software services and capabilities.
  • Browser vulnerabilities: Harden web browsers and browser clients. Applications offered by SaaS cloud vendors are accessible via secure communication through a web browser, which is a common target for malware and attacks.
  • Service-oriented architecture (SOA): Conduct ongoing assessments to continuously identify any application vulnerabilities, because the SOA libraries are maintained by the cloud vendor and not completely visible to your company. By using the vendor-provided SOA library, you can develop and test applications more quickly because SOA provides a common framework for application development.

Data Governance

  • Data ownership: Clearly define data ownership so the cloud vendor cannot refuse access to data or demand fees to return the data once the service contracts are terminated. SaaS cloud vendors will provide the applications and your company will provide the data.
  • Data disposal: Consider the options for safe disposal or destruction of any previous backups. Proper disposal of data is imperative to prevent unauthorized disclosure. Replace, recycle or upgrade disks with proper sanitization so that the information no longer remains within storage and cannot be retrieved. Ensure that the cloud vendor takes appropriate measures to prevent information assets from being sent without approval to countries where the data can be disclosed legally.
  • Data disposal upon contract termination: Implement processes to erase, sanitize and/or dispose of data migrated into the cloud vendor’s application prior to a contract termination. Ensure the details of applications are not disclosed without your company’s authorization.
  • Data encryption transmission requirements: Provide encryption of confidential data communicated between a user’s browser and a web-based application using secure protocols. Implement encryption of confidential data transmitted between an application server and a database to prevent unauthorized interception. Such encryption capabilities are generally provided as part of, or an option to, the database server software. You can achieve encryption of confidential file transfers through protocols such as Secure FTP (SFTP) or by encrypting the data prior to transmission.

Contract Management

  • Transborder legal requirements: Validate whether government entities in the hosting country require access to your company’s information, with or without proper notification. Implement necessary compliance controls and do not violate regulations in other countries when storing or transmitting data within the cloud vendor’s infrastructure. Different countries have different legal requirements, especially concerning personally identifiable information (PII).
  • Multitenancy: Segment and protect all resources allocated to a particular tenant to avoid disclosure of information to other tenants. For example, when a customer no longer needs allocated storage, it may be freely reallocated to another customer. In this case, wipe data thoroughly.
  • Network management: Determine network management roles and responsibilities with the cloud vendor. Within a SaaS implementation, the cloud vendor is entirely responsible for the network. In other models, the responsibility of the network is generally shared, but there will be exceptions.
  • Reliability: Ensure the cloud vendor has service-level agreements that specify the amount of allowable downtime and the time it will take to restore service in the event of an unexpected disruption.
  • Exit strategy: Develop an exit strategy for the eventual transition away from the cloud vendor considering tools, procedures and other offerings to securely facilitate data or service portability from the cloud vendor to another or bring services back in-house.

IT Asset Governance

  • Patch management: Determine the patch management processes with the cloud vendor and ensure there is ongoing awareness and reporting. Cloud vendors can introduce patches in their applications quickly without the approval or knowledge of your company because it can take a long time for a cloud vendor to get formal approval from every customer. This can result in your company having little control or insight regarding the patch management process and lead to unexpected side effects. Ensure that the cloud vendor hypervisor manager allows the necessary patches to be applied across the infrastructure in a short time, reducing the time available for a new vulnerability to be exploited.
  • Virtual machine security maintenance: Partner with cloud vendors that allow your company to create virtual machines (VM) in various states such as active, running, suspended and off. Although cloud vendors could be involved, the maintenance of security updates may be the responsibility of your company. Assess all inactive VMs and apply security patches to reduce the potential for out-of-date VMs to become compromised when activated.

Accelerate Your Cloud Transformation

Adopting cloud services can be a key steppingstone toward achieving your business objectives. Many companies have gained substantial value from cloud services, but there is still work to be done. Even successful companies often have cloud security gaps, including issues related to cloud security governance and management. Although it may not be easy, it’s critical to perform due diligence to address any gaps through a cloud vendor risk management program.

Cloud service security levels will vary, and security concerns will always be a part of any company’s transition to the cloud. But implementing a cloud vendor risk management program can certainly put your company in a better position to address these concerns. The bottom line is that security is no longer an acceptable reason for refusing to adopt cloud services, and the days when your business can keep up without them are officially over.

The post Security Considerations for Whatever Cloud Service Model You Adopt appeared first on Security Intelligence.