Category Archives: Chrome

Google offers high-risk Chrome users additional scanning of risky files

Google is providing a new “risky files” scanning feature to Chrome users enrolled in its Advanced Protection Program (APP). About the Advanced Protection Program Google introduced the Advanced Protection Program in 2017. It’s primarily aimed at users whose accounts are at high risk of compromise through targeted attacks – journalists, human rights and civil society activists, campaign staffers and people in abusive relationships, executives and specific employees – but anyone can sign up for it. … More

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Improved malware protection for users in the Advanced Protection Program

Google’s Advanced Protection Program helps secure people at higher risk of targeted online attacks, like journalists, political organizations, and activists, with a set of constantly evolving safeguards that reflect today’s threat landscape. Chrome is always exploring new options to help all of our users better protect themselves against common online threats like malware. As a first step, today Chrome is expanding its download scanning options for users of Advanced Protection.

Advanced Protection users are already well-protected from phishing. As a result, we’ve seen that attackers target these users through other means, such as leading them to download malware. In August 2019, Chrome began warning Advanced Protection users when a downloaded file may be malicious.

Now, in addition to this warning, Chrome is giving Advanced Protection users the ability to send risky files to be scanned by Google Safe Browsing’s full suite of malware detection technology before opening the file. We expect these cloud-hosted scans to significantly improve our ability to detect when these files are malicious.

When a user downloads a file, Safe Browsing will perform a quick check using metadata, such as hashes of the file, to evaluate whether it appears potentially suspicious. For any downloads that Safe Browsing deems risky, but not clearly unsafe, the user will be presented with a warning and the ability to send the file to be scanned. If the user chooses to send the file, Chrome will upload it to Google Safe Browsing, which will scan it using its static and dynamic analysis techniques in real time. After a short wait, if Safe Browsing determines the file is unsafe, Chrome will warn the user. As always, users can bypass the warning and open the file without scanning, if they are confident the file is safe. Safe Browsing deletes uploaded files a short time after scanning.

unknown.exe may be dangerous. Send to Google Advanced Protection for scanning?
Online threats are constantly changing, and it's important that users’ security protections automatically evolve as well. With the US election fast approaching, for example, Advanced Protection could be useful to members of political campaigns whose accounts are now more likely to be targeted. If you’re a user at high-risk of attack, visit g.co/advancedprotection to enroll in the Advanced Protection Program.

Meeting the Challenges of Remote Work with Chrome OS Policy Settings – Part II

Welcome to the second part of this two-part blog series for administrators who are new to the Chromebook enterprise system. In the previous blog, we discussed settings that are applicable to users and applications. In this blog, we will further explore the Chrome enterprise admin panel as we look into settings that pertain to privacy […]… Read More

The post Meeting the Challenges of Remote Work with Chrome OS Policy Settings – Part II appeared first on The State of Security.

Meeting the Challenges of Remote Work with Chrome OS Policy Settings – Part I

Many organizations, from enterprises to small businesses and schools, are focusing efforts on distance working and learning. One significant hurdle for those who are suddenly tasked with supporting remote users is the question of how to manage a fleet of new endpoints. One appealing solution for managing all these new remote users is to use […]… Read More

The post Meeting the Challenges of Remote Work with Chrome OS Policy Settings – Part I appeared first on The State of Security.

Protecting users from insecure downloads in Google Chrome

Update (04/06/2020): Chrome was originally scheduled to start user-visible warnings on mixed downloads in Chrome 82. These warnings, as well as subsequent blocking, will be delayed by at least two releases. Console warnings on mixed downloads will begin as scheduled in Chrome 81.

At this time, we expect to start user-visible warnings in Chrome 84. The Chrome Platform Status entry will be kept up-to-date as timing is finalized. Developers who are otherwise able to do so are encouraged to transition to secure downloads as soon as possible to avoid future disruption.


Today we’re announcing that Chrome will gradually ensure that secure (HTTPS) pages only download secure files. In a series of steps outlined below, we’ll start blocking "mixed content downloads" (non-HTTPS downloads started on secure pages). This move follows a plan we announced last year to start blocking all insecure subresources on secure pages.
Insecurely-downloaded files are a risk to users' security and privacy. For instance, insecurely-downloaded programs can be swapped out for malware by attackers, and eavesdroppers can read users' insecurely-downloaded bank statements. To address these risks, we plan to eventually remove support for insecure downloads in Chrome.
As a first step, we are focusing on insecure downloads started on secure pages. These cases are especially concerning because Chrome currently gives no indication to the user that their privacy and security are at risk.
Starting in Chrome 82 (to be released April 2020), Chrome will gradually start warning on, and later blocking, these mixed content downloads. File types that pose the most risk to users (e.g., executables) will be impacted first, with subsequent releases covering more file types. This gradual rollout is designed to mitigate the worst risks quickly, provide developers an opportunity to update sites, and minimize how many warnings Chrome users have to see.
We plan to roll out restrictions on mixed content downloads on desktop platforms (Windows, macOS, Chrome OS and Linux) first. Our plan for desktop platforms is as follows:

  • In Chrome 81 (released March 2020) and later:
    • Chrome will print a console message warning about all mixed content downloads.
  • In Chrome 82 (released April 2020):
    • Chrome will warn on mixed content downloads of executables (e.g. .exe).
  • In Chrome 83 (released June 2020):
    • Chrome will block mixed content executables
    • Chrome will warn on mixed content archives (.zip) and disk images (.iso).
  • In Chrome 84 (released August 2020):
    • Chrome will block mixed content executables, archives and disk images
    • Chrome will warn on all other mixed content downloads except image, audio, video and text formats.
  • In Chrome 85 (released September 2020):
    • Chrome will warn on mixed content downloads of images, audio, video, and text
    • Chrome will block all other mixed content downloads
  • In Chrome 86 (released October 2020) and beyond, Chrome will block all mixed content downloads.
Example of a potential warning
Chrome will delay the rollout for Android and iOS users by one release, starting warnings in Chrome 83. Mobile platforms have better native protection against malicious files, and this delay will give developers a head-start towards updating their sites before impacting mobile users.
Developers can prevent users from ever seeing a download warning by ensuring that downloads only use HTTPS. In the current version of Chrome Canary, or in Chrome 81 once released, developers can activate a warning on all mixed content downloads for testing by enabling the "Treat risky downloads over insecure connections as active mixed content" flag at chrome://flags/#treat-unsafe-downloads-as-active-content.
Enterprise and education customers can disable blocking on a per-site basis via the existing InsecureContentAllowedForUrls policy by adding a pattern matching the page requesting the download.
In the future, we expect to further restrict insecure downloads in Chrome. We encourage developers to fully migrate to HTTPS to avoid future restrictions and fully protect their users. Developers with questions are welcome to email us at security-dev@chromium.org.