Category Archives: business

5 ERP Trends in the Retail Industry in 2018

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software has helped numerous businesses across multiple industries integrate their day-to-day operations and streamline business management processes. The retail industry is one of the largest users of ERP software globally. As ERP software vendors constantly work to create less complex, more powerful and more affordable ERP solutions for the retail industry, we’re set to see changes in the ERP software market.

What should we expect? Here are our top five trends to watch for in the retail industry in 2018.

Increased Adoption of Cloud-Based ERP Systems

According to a G2 Crowd – ERP software products review, more and more ERP software vendors are shifting their focus towards cloud-based ERP offerings. From Oracle Cloud to SAP S4HANA and Microsoft Dynamics 365, there is no doubt that cloud ERP systems are gaining wider acceptance across the retail industry. Experts estimate that the cloud ERP software market will be worth around $26.5 billion by 2020, indicating an increasing trend in adoption.

While most retailers have over the years been comfortable with on-premise ERP software deployments, the recent growth in the adoption of cloud ERP solutions across almost every business sector today, has resulted in increased adoption across the thriving retail industry. Cloud ERP systems offer the benefits that retailers are looking for including better scalability, enhanced security and increased support.

Growth in the Small Business and Niche Industries

In 2018 and beyond, ERP is going to be about small and mid-sized businesses, as well as niche industries. For too long, ERP software vendors have been focusing on large companies. The software landscape is changing fast with more small and mid-sized businesses shifting to ERP SaaS solutions to ease deployment.

ERP software vendors are incorporating more functions and capabilities that they previously overlooked to meet the needs of small businesses and niche industries like the food and pharmaceutical industries. With increased usability, ERP solutions are now focusing on the growing niche market which is, in turn, driving growth in the segment.

Less Focus on Legacy ERP Systems

Unfortunately, there are still many retail businesses that are using legacy ERP systems that have been in use for many years. As more ERP providers shift to cloud ERP solutions, it’s expected that more vendors will put less focus on legacy ERP systems. In fact, most of them are no longer offering long-term support or introducing new functions to these dated systems.

Due to this growing trend, more retail businesses are opting for omnichannel ERP systems that allow them to see the connections across the different aspects of retail business management. Through such systems, retailers are able to provide their customers with a more streamlined purchase process and ensure a unified communication process.

The Push for Mobile ERP is Getting Stronger

As more employees work outside the office, there is an increasing need to be able to access information in real-time, easily collaborate with colleagues and communicate with customers on the go. In 2018 and beyond, retailers are expected to push vendors for more improved mobile ERP systems that give their employees the opportunity to access critical data like billing details, shipping details and reports on their cell phones or tablets.

Conclusion

ERP software is a key component of any successful retail business. Understanding these trends will help your business adapt to the new changes in the ERP software market. When it comes to implementing an ERP strategy, it’s important to analyze the key functionalities that your business will need in an ERP solution and plan how you can meet your business objectives using the features provided.

The post 5 ERP Trends in the Retail Industry in 2018 appeared first on TechWorm.

Are You Considering a Career in Crypto?

In 2008, a bizarre and esoteric technology by the name of bitcoin was introduced to the world in a whitepaper penned by Satoshi Nakamoto. Just one decade later, that whitepaper would spawn a budding industry racing toward the trillion-dollar mark. At the time of writing, there are more than 1,550 cryptocurrencies trying to do a […]

The post Are You Considering a Career in Crypto? appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

Occupational Licensing Blunts Competition and Boosts Inequality

Occupational licensing -- the practice of regulating who can do what jobs -- has been on the rise for decades. In 1950 one in 20 employed Americans required a licence to work. By 2017 that had risen to more than one in five. From a report: The trend partly reflects an economic shift towards service industries, in which licences are more common. But it has also been driven by a growing number of professions successfully lobbying state governments to make it harder to enter their industries. Most studies find that licensing requirements raise wages in a profession by around 10%, probably by making it harder for competitors to set up shop. Lobbyists justify licences by claiming consumers need protection from unqualified providers. In many cases this is obviously a charade. Forty-one states license makeup artists, as if wielding concealer requires government oversight. Thirteen license bartending; in nine, those who wish to pull pints must first pass an exam. Such examples are popular among critics of licensing, because the threat from unlicensed staff in low-skilled jobs seems paltry. Yet they are not representative of the broader harm done by licensing, which affects crowds of more highly educated workers like Ms Varnam. Among those with only a high-school education, 13% are licensed. The figure for those with postgraduate degrees is 45%. [...] One way of telling that many licences are superfluous is the sheer variance in the law across states. About 1,100 occupations are regulated in at least one state, but fewer than 60 are regulated in all 50, according to a report from 2015 by Barack Obama's White House. Yet a handful of high-earning professions are regulated everywhere. In particular, licences are more common in legal and health-care occupations than in any other.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Low-Tech Secret to Cyber Resilience

worldview.stratfor.com - Cities around the globe are increasingly striving to become smarter. As they take on 21st century challenges — including the strain of growing populations, social tensions and environmental issues — …


Tweeted by @UrbanVN https://twitter.com/UrbanVN/status/965246854693883906

Silicon Valley Singles Are Giving Up On the Algorithms of Love

The Washington Post: Melissa Hobley, an executive at the dating app OkCupid, hears the complaints about the apps [being unable to find good matches] regularly and thinks they get a bad rap. Silicon Valley workers "are in the business of scalable, quick solutions. And that's not what love is," Hobley said. "You can't hurry love. It's reciprocal. You're not ordering an object. You're not getting a delivery in less than seven minutes." Finding love, she added, takes commitment and energy -- and, yes, time, no matter how inefficiently it's spent. "You have a whole city obsessed with algorithms and data, and they like to say dating apps aren't solving the problem," Hobley said. "But if a city is male-dominant, if a city is known for 16-hour work days, those are issues that dating apps can't solve." One thing distinguishes the Silicon Valley dating pool: The men-to-women ratio for employed, young singles in the San Jose metro area is higher than in any other major area. There were about 150 men for every 100 women, compared with about 125 to 100 nationwide, of never-married young people between 25 and 34 in San Jose, U.S. Census Bureau data from 2016 shows. That ratio permeates the economy here, all the way to the valley's biggest employers, which have struggled for years to bring more women into their ranks. Men make up about 70% of the workforces of Apple, Facebook and Google parent Alphabet, company filings show.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Most Cities Would Welcome a Tech Billionaire, But Peter Thiel?

Sarah McBride, writing for Bloomberg: Tech billionaire Peter Thiel is moving to Los Angeles from San Francisco, adding another dose of legitimacy to a burgeoning startup scene in Southern California -- along with some controversy. The co-founder of PayPal and an early investor in Facebook, Thiel runs Founders Fund, one of the more-respected venture capital firms in Silicon Valley. He comes with a little baggage, though, including his staunch support for President Donald Trump, his secretive funding of the legal battle between Hulk Hogan and Gawker.com, and comments some people say have been derogatory toward women. "I'm not sure why Peter Thiel believes he'll receive a warmer reception on the L.A. tech scene than he's had in Silicon Valley," said Tracy DiNunzio, chief executive officer of Tradesy, a fashion-reselling company based in Santa Monica, California. "Our venture and startup ecosystem is fairly left-leaning."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Executive Survey 2018

eef.org.uk - This is the seventh edition of our annual Executive Survey, where manufacturers' look at the growth opportunities and challenges that lie ahead, and our first in partnership with AIG. We take a look …


Tweeted by @EEF_Economists https://twitter.com/EEF_Economists/status/964892430662361091

McAfee Blogs: Inside the Capabilities and Detection of UDPoS Malware

Imagine a job that changes every day of your life, where you get to do something new each week – that’s what it’s like working in the cybersecurity industry. For me, this is ideal—smarter adversaries, new challenges, and the constant struggle to predict and prepare for the future of security in information technology makes this feel a lot less like work. However, it’s important to remember that we do this only because people are getting hurt, often literally. And that’s a sobering and humbling perspective. In many scenarios, a successful campaign can have drastic effects on the victims’ lifestyles and finances. In today’s example, the victims, point-of-sale systems, are being attacked by a POS malware and are being targeted for identity and financial theft.

This particular attack leveraged a POS malware dubbed UDPoS, aptly named for its somewhat uncommon data exfiltration method over UDP, specifically via DNS queries. Although this malware is definitely not the first of its kind (see Multigrain POS malware, DNSMessenger), it certainly is an uncommon technique, and intelligent in that many organizations deprioritize DNS traffic for inspection as compared to HTTP and FTP. Coupled with the fact that UDPoS allegedly leverages a popular remote desktop service known as LogMeIn, and you have a malware campaign that could have a broad reach of victims (in this case unpatched or dated POS systems), and a unique ability to avoid detection for data exfiltration.

Although uncommon, and perhaps somewhat covert in its ability to transmit data over DNS, this malware does offer an upside for defenders — attackers will continue to use protocols which do not employ encryption. The move to SSL or other encryption methods for data exfiltration has been surprisingly inconsistent, meaning detection is relatively simple. This makes the need for communication and visibility of these kinds of techniques essential.

As defenders, McAfee’s Advanced Threat Research team actively monitors the threat landscape and tracks both new and current techniques for every stage of malware—from reconnaissance to infection, lateral movement, persistence, command and control, and exfiltration. We will stay closely tuned to determine if this technique grows in popularity or evolves in capabilities.

We are constantly playing a game of cat and mouse with the adversaries. As we adapt, protect, and attempt to predict new methods of malicious activity, we can be certain the same efforts are being made to evade and outsmart us. Our challenge as a security community is to work together, learn from each other, and apply these learnings toward recognizing and mitigating new threats, such as the DNS exfiltration method employed by UDPoS.

To learn more about UDPoS malware and others like it, be sure to follow @McAfee and @McAfee_Labs on Twitter.

The post Inside the Capabilities and Detection of UDPoS Malware appeared first on McAfee Blogs.



McAfee Blogs

Inside the Capabilities and Detection of UDPoS Malware

Imagine a job that changes every day of your life, where you get to do something new each week – that’s what it’s like working in the cybersecurity industry. For me, this is ideal—smarter adversaries, new challenges, and the constant struggle to predict and prepare for the future of security in information technology makes this feel a lot less like work. However, it’s important to remember that we do this only because people are getting hurt, often literally. And that’s a sobering and humbling perspective. In many scenarios, a successful campaign can have drastic effects on the victims’ lifestyles and finances. In today’s example, the victims, point-of-sale systems, are being attacked by a POS malware and are being targeted for identity and financial theft.

This particular attack leveraged a POS malware dubbed UDPoS, aptly named for its somewhat uncommon data exfiltration method over UDP, specifically via DNS queries. Although this malware is definitely not the first of its kind (see Multigrain POS malware, DNSMessenger), it certainly is an uncommon technique, and intelligent in that many organizations deprioritize DNS traffic for inspection as compared to HTTP and FTP. Coupled with the fact that UDPoS allegedly leverages a popular remote desktop service known as LogMeIn, and you have a malware campaign that could have a broad reach of victims (in this case unpatched or dated POS systems), and a unique ability to avoid detection for data exfiltration.

Although uncommon, and perhaps somewhat covert in its ability to transmit data over DNS, this malware does offer an upside for defenders — attackers will continue to use protocols which do not employ encryption. The move to SSL or other encryption methods for data exfiltration has been surprisingly inconsistent, meaning detection is relatively simple. This makes the need for communication and visibility of these kinds of techniques essential.

As defenders, McAfee’s Advanced Threat Research team actively monitors the threat landscape and tracks both new and current techniques for every stage of malware—from reconnaissance to infection, lateral movement, persistence, command and control, and exfiltration. We will stay closely tuned to determine if this technique grows in popularity or evolves in capabilities.

We are constantly playing a game of cat and mouse with the adversaries. As we adapt, protect, and attempt to predict new methods of malicious activity, we can be certain the same efforts are being made to evade and outsmart us. Our challenge as a security community is to work together, learn from each other, and apply these learnings toward recognizing and mitigating new threats, such as the DNS exfiltration method employed by UDPoS.

To learn more about UDPoS malware and others like it, be sure to follow @McAfee and @McAfee_Labs on Twitter.

The post Inside the Capabilities and Detection of UDPoS Malware appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Labor Board Says Google Could Fire James Damore For Anti-Diversity Memo

According to a recently disclosed letter from the U.S. National Labor Relations Board, Google didn't violate labor laws by firing engineer James Damore for a memo criticizing the company's diversity program. "The lightly redacted statement is written by Jayme Sophir, associate general counsel of the NLRB's division of advice; it dates to January, but was released yesterday, according to Law.com," reports The Verge. "Sophir concludes that while some parts of Damore's memo was legally protected by workplace regulations, 'the statements regarding biological differences between the sexes were so harmful, discriminatory, and disruptive as to be unprotected.'" From the report: Damore filed an NLRB complaint in August of 2017, after being fired for internally circulating a memo opposing Google's diversity efforts. Sophir recommends dismissing the case; Bloomberg reports that Damore withdrew it in January, and that his lawyer says he's focusing on a separate lawsuit alleging discrimination against conservative white men at Google. NLRB records state that its case was closed on January 19th. In her analysis, Sophir writes that employers should be given "particular deference" in trying to enforce anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies, since these are tied to legal requirements. And employers have "a strong interest in promoting diversity" and cooperation across different groups of people. Because of this, "employers must be permitted to 'nip in the bud' the kinds of employee conduct that could lead to a 'hostile workplace,'" she writes. "Where an employee's conduct significantly disrupts work processes, creates a hostile work environment, or constitutes racial or sexual discrimination or harassment, the Board has found it unprotected even if it involves concerted activities regarding working conditions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

First Internet Bancorp: Breaking The Shackles

Traditional bank stocks have been pretty boring until recently.  Yes, that is changing.  The prospects of a steeper yield curve could make for better earnings in 2018.  But if it weren’t for some of the exciting things to come along in financial technology, the S&P 500 financial index would still be stuck in the rut […]

The post First Internet Bancorp: Breaking The Shackles appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

Atari Is Jumping on the Crypto Bandwagon

Atari has announced plans to create a company token and potentially develop cryptocurrency-based casino platforms. The company, commonly associated with arcade classics such as Asteroids, Pac-Man, Space Invaders, and Pong, seems to believe new life can be breathed into the casino industry through cryptocurrency. From a report: "Blockchain technology is poised to take a very important place in our environment and to transform, if not revolutionize, the current economic ecosystem, especially in the areas of the video game industry and online transactions," Atari Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Frederic Chesnais said in the statement. "Our aim is to take strategic positions with a limited cash risk, in order to best create value with the assets and the Atari brand."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Executive Spotlight: An Interview with Chris Barnett, VP of Technology & CTO of General Dynamics IT’s Intelligence Solutions Division

blog.executivebiz.com - Now is an exciting time to be involved in the world of technology development, as the vehicle of innovation continues to accelerate forward into the future. The ‘technolution’ that we’re seeing in cy…


Tweeted by @jimgarrettson https://twitter.com/jimgarrettson/status/964269364701728769

Uber CEO: We Could Be Profitable — We Just Don’t Want To Be

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said he's not worried that his company lost $4.5 billion last year and claimed the company could "turn the knobs" to be profitable if it wanted to -- it just doesn't. From a report: Khosrowshahi made the comments at the Goldman Sachs Technology and Internet Conference in San Francisco this week where he explained that if Uber did turn those knobs to be an immediately profitable company it would "sacrifice growth and sacrifice innovation." He also spoke optimistically about the impact self-driving cars will have on transportation costs.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Coinbase is Erratically Overcharging Some Users and Emptying Their Bank Accounts

A growing number of Coinbase customers are complaining that the cryptocurrency exchange withdrew unauthorized money out of their accounts. From a report: In some cases, this drained their linked bank accounts below zero, resulting in overdraft charges. In a typical anecdote posted on Reddit, one user said they purchased Bitcoin, Ether, and Litecoin for a total of $300 on February 9th. A few days later, the transactions repeated five times for a total of $1,500, even though the user had not made any more purchases. That was enough to clear out this user's bank account, they said, resulting in fees. [...] Coinbase representatives have been responding to similar complaints on Reddit for about two weeks, but the volume of complaints seems to have spiked over the last 24 hours. Similar complaints have popped up on forums and Twitter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Physician, protect thyself: healthcare cybersecurity circling the drain

No one knows you better than you do. But thanks to technology advances and the continued digitization of healthcare data accumulation and sharing processes, we can also honestly say the same about your healthcare provider.

Indeed, every time we get in touch with a health professional, data is recorded (either on paper or electronically), entered into a computer, and then stored in a massive database for record-keeping, analysis, and retrieval.

This digital warehouse of electronic health records (EHR), which contain medical history, diagnoses, and medications (including billing data, insurance, and other personally identifiable information), is what cybercriminals are after. For healthcare facilities in the business of research, intellectual property is their primary asset at risk. Such a trove in the wrong hands could mean nothing good.

A horripilation of dread

Dismally, where healthcare excels in medical breakthroughs and advances in therapy, it lacks in cybersecurity preparedness and adoption of privacy practices. Studies from independent organizations consistently reveal that the continuous use of legacy systems—those outdated programs and computers running Windows XP—scarce resources allocated for cybersecurity, and an apparent shortage of IT professionals top the list of problems the healthcare industry faces. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.

Technological advancements that make reviewing, sharing, and storing digital information possible present other significant challenges that need addressing. They include:

  • The easy accessibility of patient records
  • The automation of clinical systems (e.g. the ordering of prescription medicine for patients)
  • The introduction of external media or third-party devices to the hospital network
  • The emergence of mobile health apps
  • The increasing adoption of BYOD
  • The overall lack of awareness of risks to patient health data among hospital and clinic staff

Below, we take a look at the cybersecurity risks that each of these challenges present.

Easy accessibility of patient records

Public-facing healthcare facilities like hospitals and clinics have embraced the move from paper records to digital records. In so doing, they gather and store patient data into databases open to anyone with access to them, whether it be a doctor 20 miles from the building or a nurse at the reception desk.

The digitization of patient health records also made the process of sharing information across multiple healthcare facilities easier. Patients, too, are given access to their health records. Because of this, the likelihood of exposure to threats increases.

All that storing, retrieving, and sharing leaves the door open to malicious actors who can just as easily infiltrate the database to steal information and sell it on the black market. How valuable is patient data? Very valuable. Medicare ID numbers belonging to 10 patients, for example, are being sold for 22 Bitcoins, which amounts to more than $200,00 as of this writing. EHRs carries a hefty price tag because this is the kind of data that criminals can use and reuse for decades. And unlike credit card data, medical records cannot be altered or canceled once used in fraud.


Read: Think tank summarizes what happens to healthcare records after breach


Automation of hospital and clinic systems

Removing redundant and tedious tasks from healthcare professionals’ workday is a sound business move. It increases productivity, saves money, and improves the patient experience. However, as much good as automation has brought the industry, the implementation of its systems may have been carried out without cybersecurity or privacy in mind.

Those who quickly went about deploying automation for services like refilling prescriptions or making appointments might have medical devices and web-facing computers in the same network when they should be separate, for example. When medical devices are networked on the Internet and not secured, that leaves the door open for threat actors to exploit.

External media or third-party devices

Although the use of unencrypted external media and portable devices is against HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) standards, staff and third-party contractors continue to introduce such devices to computer systems connected to the hospital network. There have also been instances where patients have brought their medical records in via external media for doctors to review.

Two possible ends could come from this: portable media and devices might get stolen or misplaced, resulting in a security breach, and/0r malware might be introduced to the network. Ideally, both ends should be avoided at all cost.

Mobile health apps

We’re talking about mobile health, or mHealth, apps used by patients and medical professionals alike. These apps collect data from whoever uses them, and if doctors have access to this data, they can readily provide feedback or advise. Unfortunately, there is no such thing as a “one app that rules them all.” There are thousands of them out there in the market, believe it or not. And each one of them needs to be secured, else risk all those data getting leaked.

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)

In 2012, Aruba Networks published the results of their survey, revealing that 85 percent of healthcare staff and professionals support the use of personal mobile devices, such as smartphones, laptops, and tablets, at work. Some say this trend is a natural fit for the industry as doctors and nurses are frequently on the move.

Being able to access records on the fly and sharing them with colleagues increases collaboration and productivity among healthcare staff. However, mobile devices owned by hospital staff and professionals are liable to theft. If they are not encrypted, it’s easy enough for the thief to retrieve, make use of, or sell the EHR stored in them.

Some hospitals and clinics also allow patients and visitors to connect to the facility’s Internet. This results in both patient and staff member BYOD devices overwhelming the bandwidth. On top of this, no one is really sure if such devices are secure enough, if at all. If a potentially infected device is introduced to the network, malware could take residence in the server or spread to other devices connected to the network.


Read: BYOD, why don’t you?

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Lack of cybersecurity awareness

Lastly, healthcare staff is generally unaware of threats to patient data and are poorly prepared to identify attack types. This is probably why they may appear negligent in handling email, mobile devices, and hospital records. As we have already established before, cybersecurity issues are not just something that IT staff should scramble to address. Everyone, including nurses and doctors, has a responsibility to uphold when it comes to protecting patient data and securing hospital resources from external threats.

Sadly, there’s no panacea in sight

Unfortunately, there’s no magic bullet to address the myriad of challenges born from an environment this complex. In fact, addressing problems and risks surrounding something this important shouldn’t be rushed. People’s lives, after all, are at stake here, too. Although an overhaul may be needed to completely turn things around for the healthcare industry, this still takes a considerable amount of time to implement. And even if it has been completed, continuous improvement must naturally follow.

The good news is that healthcare facilities, regardless of size, don’t have to wait for a major revamp to happen before they can address the current dilemmas plaguing their industry. In part 2 of this post, we’ll discuss steps healthcare organizations can take to stay secure—beginning with awareness and education campaigns.

Until then, be well and stay safe!

The post Physician, protect thyself: healthcare cybersecurity circling the drain appeared first on Malwarebytes Labs.

Five charged over GSK secrets scheme

bbc.com - Five people have been charged in the US with scheming to steal trade secrets from the drugs giant GlaxoSmithKline with the intention of selling them in China. The five include two former GlaxoSmithKl…


Tweeted by @OneRingwood https://twitter.com/OneRingwood/status/964040183556530176

Identity Fraud Hits All Time High With 16.7 Million U.S. Victims in 2017, According to New Javelin Strategy & Research Study

javelinstrategy.com - This last year saw a notable change in how fraud is being committed. While credit card accounts remained the most prevalent targets for new account fraud, there was significant growth in the opening …


Tweeted by @AegisFS https://twitter.com/AegisFS/status/963912702828654593

Valve Bans Developer After Employees Leave Fake User Reviews

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Insel Games, a Maltese developer of online multiplayer titles, has been banned from Steam and had all its titles removed from Valve's storefront after evidence surfaced that it was encouraging employees to manipulate user review scores on the service. Yesterday, redditor nuttinbutruth posted a purported leaked email from Insel Games' CEO encouraging employees to buy reimbursed copies of the game in order to leave a Steam review. "Of course I cannot force you to write a review (let alone tell you what to write) -- but I should not have to," the email reads. "Neglecting the importance of reviews will ultimately cost jobs. If [Wild Busters] fails, Insel fails... and then we will all have no jobs next year." In a message later in the day, Valve said it had investigated the claims in the Reddit post and "identified unacceptable behavior involving multiple Steam accounts controlled by the publisher of this game. The publisher appears to have used multiple Steam accounts to post positive reviews for their own games. This is a clear violation of our review policy and something we take very seriously." While Valve has ended its business relationship with Insel Games, users who previously purchased the company's games on Steam will still be able to use them.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Kaspersky Lab official blog: Three reasons to register for the TEISS 2018 online workshop

Threat actors and malware developers never sleep, it seems, and as protection advances, so do cybercriminals. That’s why we are hosting a keynote and an online workshop at the European Information Security Summit (TEISS) 2018 — to try to help businesses get their networks prepared and up to speed against new and emerging threats.

The opening keynote will be hosted by Adam Maskatiya, the general manager for UK and Ireland, Kaspersky Lab, who will discuss how interconnectedness brings about both opportunities and headaches. The keynote will focus on the ways businesses are moving more and more to the cloud and remote endpoints, causing problems for IT departments. Maskatiya will take a look at how businesses can use a multilayered approach that includes machine learning to keep their networks secure, and also how they can start conversations to build a business community that shares intelligence and skills to keep everybody safe. For those who aren’t able to attend the event and listen to the keynote in person, we’re hosting a three-part online workshop.


 

The first section of the workshop will be hosted by David Emm, a principal security researcher on our Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT). This part will focus on the top trends in threats targeting enterprises: what they are, how they are likely to evolve in the coming year, their impact, and what they mean for risk and protection (threat detection and management), illustrated with examples from financial, automotive, healthcare, and industrial automation.

In the second section, Alessio Aceti, the head of Kaspersky Lab’s Enterprise Business division, will discuss security processes, expertise, and tools for the new threat landscape.

The workshop will conclude with a panel discussion between senior security leaders, including Adam Maskatiya, and moderated by respected security journalist Dan Raywood.

Read the full agenda of the event on the TEISS 2018 website.



Kaspersky Lab official blog

Shotspotter: A New Weapon To Combat Violent Crime

U.S. violent crime is near a modern day low but the events of the recent past raise disturbing questions.  How does law enforcement deal with random gun violence.  A seven-year-old company named Shotspotter Inc. (SSTI: 17) is using technology to help first responders. Taking It To The Streets Shotspotter claims to be the leader in […]

The post Shotspotter: A New Weapon To Combat Violent Crime appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

Porsche Is 3D Printing Hard-To-Find Parts For The 959 And Other Classics

Porsche Classic, Porsche's classic cars division, has turned to 3D printing obscure parts that people might need on occasion. From a report: They already have about 52,000 parts available, but for the truly arcane ones, it's cheaper to 3D print them than make the specialized tools to create them over again. In addition to that 959 lever, Porsche is also 3D printing eight other parts. They are made from steel and alloy and the plastics are made using an selective laser sintering printer, which Porsche describes as: "A process where the material is heated to just below melting point and the remaining energy is applied through a laser to fuse the plastic powder at a selected point." So there you have it! The next time something is busted on your 959 or 356, don't cry and abandon the car, stalled on the side of the road. Call up Porsche. They'll science something for you.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Countries that Are Most Highly Invested in Automation

A report by the International Federation of Robotics looks at the countries that are most highly invested in manufacturing automation. The countries with the ten highest densities of robots are, in order: South Korea (631 per 10,000 workers), Singapore (488), Germany (309), Japan (303), Sweden (223), Denmark (211), United States (189), Italy (185), Belgium (184), and Taiwan (177). Overall, the automation of production is accelerating around the world: 74 robot units per 10,000 employees (up from 66 in 2015) is the new average of global robot density in the manufacturing industries.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

‘Troll’ Loses Cloudflare Lawsuit, Has Weaponized Patent Invalidated

A federal judge in San Francisco has unequivocally ruled against a non-practicing entity that had sued Cloudflare for patent infringement. From a report: The judicial order effectively ends the case that Blackbird -- which Cloudflare had dubbed a "patent troll" -- had brought against the well-known security firm and content delivery network. "Abstract ideas are not patentable," US District Judge Vincent Chhabria wrote in a Monday order. The case revolved around US Patent No. 6,453,335, which describes providing a "third party data channel" online. When the case was filed in May 2017, the invention claims it can incorporate third-party data into an existing Internet connection "in a convenient and flexible way."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Bill Gates: Tech Companies Inviting Government Intervention

In an interview with Axios on Tuesday, Bill Gates warned Apple and other tech giants that they risk the kind of nightmarish government intervention that once plagued his Microsoft if they act arrogantly. Axios reports: The big picture: "The companies need to be careful that they're not ... advocating things that would prevent government from being able to, under appropriate review, perform the type of functions that we've come to count on." Asked if he sees instances of that now, Gates replied: "Oh, absolutely." Why it matters: With the Big Tech companies feeling they're suddenly drawing unfair scrutiny, this is Microsoft's co-founder saying they're bringing some of the problems on themselves, by resisting legitimate oversight.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Qpagos: A New Name In Fintech

There are lots of entrepreneurs situations these days for investors to choose from.  QPAGOS (QPAG, $0.21: OTC) is a company a little further along the curve with approximately $3.5+ million in revenues. QPAGOS (translation: Q Payments) is a virtual bank serving  Mexico where they offer an integrated network of kiosks and terminals totaling more than […]

The post Qpagos: A New Name In Fintech appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

Amazon Is Cutting Hundreds of Corporate Jobs

According to a Seattle Times report, Amazon is laying off hundreds of corporate workers in its Seattle headquarters and elsewhere. "The corporate cuts come after an eight-year hiring spree, taking the company from 5,000 in 2010 to 40,000 in its Seattle headquarters and gobbling up several retail businesses throughout the country," reports TechCrunch. From the report: However, according to the report, Amazon's rising employee numbers over the last two years left some departments over budget and with too many staff on hand. In the last few months, the company implemented hiring freezes to stem the flow of new workers, cutting the number of open positions in half from the 3,500 listed last Summer. The layoffs will mainly focus on Amazon's Seattle office, but there have already been cuts in some of its retail subsidiaries in other parts of the country, such as the Las Vegas-based online footwear retailer Zappos, which had to lay off 30 people recently. And the company behind Diapers.com, Quidsi, had to cut more than 250 jobs a year ago. The moves suggest Amazon may be trying to rein in spending and consolidate some of its retail businesses.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

And the award for the best essay goes to whoever reads this article!

Are you sure you understood the topic?

Make sure you know what the topic is and then see if you really understood it. And by that, we want you to read the instructions again to see what you need to do for this essay.

Do you have to write about a certain topic?

How long should it be? How many pages?

If you need an essay writing service (and it’s understandable, these are not easy to do), then you might just be in luck for coming here.

Get your play on!

So you know the topic, right? Even if it’s a given or a chosen one, you need to understand it and write about it. But what should it say? Is it one regarding science? Should it demonstrate something special? We get that you need to get your words together to make a total of 2000, but don’t just stay on one idea. Write a good essay by showing you actually know what you’re talking about.

Use examples to support your ideas

This is a very important aspect of your essay. You need to put ideas there, and then show examples to make them valid. You can use sources from your bibliography given from your teacher, or just use books, papers or journals. But be careful, you might now always get what you want. Your teacher might expressly want to use a certain bibliography, so putting their ideas from other sources would just be a waste of time. Make sure you know what your teacher wants.

Edit and proofread your essay

It’s very important that you don’t have any mistakes in your essay – especially not regarding grammar or punctuation. Don’t forget to use serious spelling checkers, don’t rely on some cheap program. Maybe a person who’s an expert is a better idea?

You’re only joking yourself

This one is that important. If you plagiarize, you risk failing. Assuming something that’s not yours is, on the one hand, not a moral thing to do, and on the other hand – something…poor. Besides, lots of schools have some programmes that help them see if you’re stolen something or not. So make sure you cite all the sources and use quotation marks for every word that’s not yours.

Stop using fancy words

You need to stop doing this right now. You’re not going to impress anyone – you’re actually going to make a fool out of yourself, mostly because you’d not have any idea of what that word might actually mean – this leads to you using that certain word in a wrong context, and this might ruin all for you.

Say when you need help

Yes, you read that right. Go to your teacher or supervisor and ask for help. It’s the normal thing to do when you’re not able to find your way to doing your essay. And it’s great to have someone who can guide you through your essay. If that person is also willing to check and proofread your work – it’s even better!

The post And the award for the best essay goes to whoever reads this article! appeared first on TechWorm.

Searching For Lithium Deposits With Satellites

A group led by Cristian Rossi, an expert on remote sensing, is using satellites already in orbit to detect and map geological and botanical features that might betray the presence of subterranean lithium. Though satellite prospecting of this sort has been employed before, reads a new report in The Economist, to look for metals such as gold and copper, using it to search for lithium is new. From the report, which may be paywalled: The searchers are not searching blind. They know, from mining records dating from the mid-1800s, that there is lithium in Cornwall's rocks. Those records tell of underground springs containing salts of lithium -- at that time quite a recently discovered element. Back then these springs were seen, at best, as curiosities, and at worst as flooding risks, because there was then no market for the metal. Today, there is. In particular, lithium is the eponymous component of lithium-ion batteries. These power products ranging from smartphones to electric cars, and are being tested as a means of grid-scale electricity storage which could make the spread of renewable energy much easier. No surprise, then, that prices have been rising. In 2008 a tonne of lithium carbonate cost around $6,000. Now it would set you back more than $12,000.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Where Old, Unreadable Documents Go to Be Understood

From a report: On any given day, from her home on the Isle of Man, Linda Watson might be reading a handwritten letter from one Confederate soldier to another, or a list of convicts transported to Australia. Or perhaps she is reading a will, a brief from a long-forgotten legal case, an original Jane Austen manuscript. Whatever is in them, these documents made their way to her because they have one thing in common: They're close to impossible to read. Watson's company, Transcription Services, has a rare specialty -- transcribing historical documents that stump average readers. Once, while talking to a client, she found the perfect way to sum up her skills. [...] Since she first started specializing in old documents, Watson has expanded beyond things written in English. She now has a stable of collaborators who can tackle manuscripts in Latin, German, Spanish, and more. She can only remember two instances that left her and her colleagues stumped. One was a Tibetan manuscript, and she couldn't find anyone who knew the alphabet. The other was in such bad shape that she had to admit defeat. In the business of reading old documents, Watson has few competitors. There is one transcription company on the other side of the world, in Australia, that offers a similar service. Libraries and archives, when they have a giant batch of handwritten documents to deal with, might recruit volunteers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How Delivery Apps May Put Your Favorite Restaurant Out of Business

In a piece this month, The New Yorker argues that online food discovery and delivery platforms are bad for restaurants. From the report: In recent years, online platforms like Uber Eats, Seamless, and GrubHub (which merged with Seamless, in 2013) have turned delivery from a small segment of the restaurant industry, dominated by pizza, to a booming new source of sales for food establishments of all stripes. When the average consumer logs in to the Caviar app to order a Mulberry & Vine salad for the office or a grain bowl on the way home from work, she might reasonably assume that her order is benefitting the restaurant's bottom line. But Gauthier, like many other restaurant owners I've spoken to in recent months, paints a more complicated picture. "We know for a fact that as delivery increases, our profitability decreases," she said. For each order that Mulberry & Vine sends out, between twenty and forty per cent of the revenue goes to third-party platforms and couriers. (Gauthier initially had her own couriers on staff, but, as delivery volumes grew, coordinating them became unmanageable.) Calculating an order's exact profitability is tricky, Gauthier said, but she estimated that in the past three years Mulberry & Vine's over-all profit margin has shrunk by a third, and that the only obvious contributing factor is the shift toward delivery.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Why Hiring the ‘Best’ People Produces the Least Creative Results

An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from a report written by Scott E. Page, who explains why hiring the "best" people produces the least creative results: The burgeoning of teams -- most academic research is now done in teams, as is most investing and even most songwriting (at least for the good songs) -- tracks the growing complexity of our world. We used to build roads from A to B. Now we construct transportation infrastructure with environmental, social, economic, and political impacts. The complexity of modern problems often precludes any one person from fully understanding them. The multidimensional or layered character of complex problems also undermines the principle of meritocracy: The idea that the "best person" should be hired. There is no best person. When putting together an oncological research team, a biotech company such as Gilead or Genentech would not construct a multiple-choice test and hire the top scorers, or hire people whose resumes score highest according to some performance criteria. Instead, they would seek diversity. They would build a team of people who bring diverse knowledge bases, tools and analytic skills. That team would more likely than not include mathematicians (though not logicians such as Griffeath). And the mathematicians would likely study dynamical systems and differential equations. Believers in a meritocracy might grant that teams ought to be diverse but then argue that meritocratic principles should apply within each category. Thus the team should consist of the "best" mathematicians, the "best" oncologists, and the "best" biostatisticians from within the pool. That position suffers from a similar flaw. Even with a knowledge domain, no test or criteria applied to individuals will produce the best team. Each of these domains possesses such depth and breadth, that no test can exist. When building a forest, you do not select the best trees as they tend to make similar classifications. You want diversity. Programmers achieve that diversity by training each tree on different data, a technique known as bagging. They also boost the forest 'cognitively' by training trees on the hardest cases -- those that the current forest gets wrong. This ensures even more diversity and accurate forests.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Who Killed The ICO?

For all the hype and chatter we listened to going back to last year, initial coin offerings have suddenly gone dead.  The entire month of January 2018 raised only $52 million according to ICOWatchlist.com.  In the halcyon days this was the rate of  inflow every three days (it’s important to note that crowdfunding amounts vary, […]

The post Who Killed The ICO? appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

Anatomy of a Social Network

openermedia.blogspot.com - ©2011 Ntrepid Corporation. All rights reserved. PROPRIETARY Finding Hidden Connections and True Influencers in Target Data ©2011 Ntrepid Corporation. All rights reserved. PROPRIETARY ©2011 Ntrepid Co…


Tweeted by @razzendres https://twitter.com/razzendres/status/962453788429815809

Mayfair Games Shuts Down After 36 Years of Board Games

damnbunni writes: Longtime board game publisher Mayfair Games (English-language publisher for Settlers of Catan, Agricola, and many more) has shut down after 36 years. All of their games have been sold to Asmodee, who also owns Fantasy Flight Games, Z-Man Games, Rebel, Edge Entertainment, and a host of other board game companies they've picked up over the years. "As of today, the management team at Mayfair Games, Inc. announces we will wind down game publishing," the company said in a statement. "After 36 years, this was not an easy decision or one we took lightly, but it was necessary. Once we had come to this conclusion, we knew we had to find a good home for our games which is when we reached out to Asmodee."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Amazon To Take On UPS, FedEx Via ‘Shipping With Amazon’

According to a report by The Wall Street Journal, Amazon is planning to take on UPS and FedEx with a new shipping service named "Shipping with Amazon" (SWA). The new service will reportedly roll out in Los Angeles in the coming weeks. Ars Technica reports: Aside from first starting in LA, SWA will first serve third-party merchants that already sell on Amazon. The company plans to send drivers to pick up shipments from these businesses and deliver the packages for them. While shipping and delivery will mostly go through Amazon, anything outside of the retailer's reach will be given to the USPS and other shipping services for the "last mile" portion of the delivery. In the future, Amazon reportedly wants to open up SWA to businesses that aren't affiliated with the site -- meaning Amazon could ship and deliver packages from companies of all sizes. Amazon also believes it can compete with UPS and FedEx by making SWA more affordable for business customers, but its pricing structure hasn't been revealed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Satori Botnet Turns IoT Devices Into Zombies By Borrowing Code from Mirai

Like a zombie rising from the dead, a new botnet is reemerging from the remains of Mirai malware. Specifically, modern-day threat actors are breathing life into a fast-evolving botnet called Satori by repurposing some of the source code from Mirai. And now, Satori is creating zombies of its own, as its been found hijacking internet-connected devices and turning them into an obedient botnet army that can be remotely controlled in unison.

Satori, as of now, is a work in progress. But that also means it’s evolving rapidly. Satori knows that agility equates to survival — we’ve seen it adapt to security measures and transcend its former self time and time again. Researchers have even taken down the main Satori C&C server, only to find the botnet remerge shortly after.

So it’s no surprise that it recently reemerged stronger than ever before. The current version has been found targeting software associated with ARC processors, which are used in a variety of IoT devices. Once it finds a weakness in an IoT device, Satori checks to see if default settings have been changed, and gains control of any machine that still has them. From there, it connects to the larger network and gains control of other devices that may be on it. So far, Satori has only managed to enslave a small number of devices. But once its army becomes large enough, it can be summoned to pump out masses of e-mail spam, incapacitate corporate websites, or even bring down large chunks of the internet itself.

Apparently, Satori doesn’t just take code from Mirai, it takes cues too – as these efforts are reminiscent of the infamous Mirai DDoS attack. But we can take cues from Mirai too in order to prepare for a potential Satori attack. First and foremost, every owner of an IoT device must change the default settings immediately – a necessary security precaution that many don’t take, which gave Mirai the firepower it needed in the first place. From there, users should disable telnet access from the outside and use SSH for remote administration if needed. However, this responsibility falls on the shoulders of manufacturers too, as they should enforce these settings by default. If both users and vendors follow these simple security steps, we can stunt Satori’s growth and stifle its Mirai-inspired ambitions entirely.

To learn more about the Satori botnet, and others like it, be sure to follow @McAfee and @McAfee_Labs on Twitter.

The post Satori Botnet Turns IoT Devices Into Zombies By Borrowing Code from Mirai appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

McAfee Blogs: Satori Botnet Turns IoT Devices Into Zombies By Borrowing Code from Mirai

Like a zombie rising from the dead, a new botnet is reemerging from the remains of Mirai malware. Specifically, modern-day threat actors are breathing life into a fast-evolving botnet called Satori by repurposing some of the source code from Mirai. And now, Satori is creating zombies of its own, as its been found hijacking internet-connected devices and turning them into an obedient botnet army that can be remotely controlled in unison.

Satori, as of now, is a work in progress. But that also means it’s evolving rapidly. Satori knows that agility equates to survival — we’ve seen it adapt to security measures and transcend its former self time and time again. Researchers have even taken down the main Satori C&C server, only to find the botnet remerge shortly after.

So it’s no surprise that it recently reemerged stronger than ever before. The current version has been found targeting software associated with ARC processors, which are used in a variety of IoT devices. Once it finds a weakness in an IoT device, Satori checks to see if default settings have been changed, and gains control of any machine that still has them. From there, it connects to the larger network and gains control of other devices that may be on it. So far, Satori has only managed to enslave a small number of devices. But once its army becomes large enough, it can be summoned to pump out masses of e-mail spam, incapacitate corporate websites, or even bring down large chunks of the internet itself.

Apparently, Satori doesn’t just take code from Mirai, it takes cues too – as these efforts are reminiscent of the infamous Mirai DDoS attack. But we can take cues from Mirai too in order to prepare for a potential Satori attack. First and foremost, every owner of an IoT device must change the default settings immediately – a necessary security precaution that many don’t take, which gave Mirai the firepower it needed in the first place. From there, users should disable telnet access from the outside and use SSH for remote administration if needed. However, this responsibility falls on the shoulders of manufacturers too, as they should enforce these settings by default. If both users and vendors follow these simple security steps, we can stunt Satori’s growth and stifle its Mirai-inspired ambitions entirely.

To learn more about the Satori botnet, and others like it, be sure to follow @McAfee and @McAfee_Labs on Twitter.

The post Satori Botnet Turns IoT Devices Into Zombies By Borrowing Code from Mirai appeared first on McAfee Blogs.



McAfee Blogs

51 Percent of Financial Services Companies Believe Existing Tech is Holding Them Back

An anonymous reader shares a report: Legacy technology can be a major obstacle to digital transformation projects and, according to a new survey of financial services technology decision makers carried out for business consultancy Janeiro Digital, almost 51 percent say existing technology is holding back innovation. Three of the biggest roadblocks are seen as lack of support for change (34 percent), legacy technology and infrastructure (31.6 percent) and a lack of in-house technical skill (29.5 percent). As a consequence 23 percent of respondents believe their company is behind in digital transformation compared to others in the industry. Only 47 percent are currently implementing new technologies, with 12.6 percent wanting to do so but not having started. That leaves 40 percent not innovating which could see them lose out in a world where consumers want better, faster financial products.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Nvidia Will Focus on Gaming Because Cryptocurrencies Are ‘Volatile’

Graphics card manufacturer Nvidia made almost $10 billion dollars in the last fiscal year, that's up 41 percent from the previous period. The GPU company broke the news to its investors in a conference call on Thursday, and said that video games such as Star Wars: Battlefront II and Playerunknown's Battlegrounds as well as the unprecedented success of the Nintendo Switch led to the record profits. That and cryptocurrency. From a report: Graphics cards are the preferred engine of today's cryptocurrency miners. It's led to a shortage of the GPUs, a spike in their prices, and record profits for the company that manufactures them. "Strong demand in the cryptocurrency market exceeded our expectations," Nvidia chief financial officer Colette Kress told investors during its earnings call yesterday. "We met some of this demand with a dedicated board in our OEM business and some was met with our gaming GPUs." But Nvidia is having trouble keeping up with the demand and it's recommended retailers put gamers ahead of cryptocurrency miners while supply is limited. Kress acknowledged the shortage on the call and reaffirmed Nvidia's commitment to gamers. "While the overall contribution of cryptocurrency to our business remains hard to quantify, we believe it was a higher percentage of revenue than the prior quarter," she said. "That said, our main focus remains on our core gaming market as cryptocurrency trends will likely remain volatile." When Kress finished her statement and opened up the line to questions, the first question was about cryptocurrency. "Is crypto being modeled more conservatively?" An investor from Evercore asked. "We model crypto approximately flat," said Jensen Huang, Nvidia's chief executive officer.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google’s Parent Company Alphabet Is Buying Chelsea Market For $2 Billion

Alphabet is close to acquiring the iconic Chelsea Market in Midtown Manhattan for over $2 billion. The market totals 1.2 million square feet and sits across the street from the company's New York headquarters, a 2.9 million-square-foot building that it bought for $1.8 billion in 2010. Quartz reports: Google is already the Market's largest tenant, having steadily expanded its footprint to about 400,000 square feet. The tech giant hasn't revealed plans for the property, but according to The Real Deal, the company is expected to maintain the status quo. Alphabet's aggressive expansion in New York follows a growing trend of tech giants taking over cities. With their outsized share of the economy, tech companies are exerting increasing influence over urban infrastructure and development.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Detroit Quietly Bans Airbnb

A new zoning ordinance that quietly went into effect this week has residents trying to figure out what comes next for Airbnb's presence in Detroit. Many hosts have received notices that the city has outlawed Airbnb for R1 and R2 zoning. Curbed Detroit reports: The new zoning ordinance apparently went through the Planning Commission and City Council in 2017, and went into effect this week. The text added to the amendment states: "Use of a dwelling to accommodate paid overnight guests is prohibited as a home occupation; notwithstanding this regulation, public accommodations, including bed and breakfast inns outside the R1 and R2 Districts, are permitted as provided in Sec. 61-12-46 of this Code." The vast majority of Airbnb units in Detroit are in R1 and R2 districts. These do not include places like lofts, apartments, or larger developments. Airbnb has issued a statement saying: "We're very disappointed by this turn of events. Airbnb has served as an economic engine for middle class Detroiters, many of whom rely on the supplemental income to stay in their homes. We hope that the city listens to our host community and permits home sharing in these residential zones."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Kagame to meet Chinese President

newtimes.co.rw - President Paul Kagame is on Friday expected to hold bilateral talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping as part of his two-day official visit to China. Kagame’s meeting with the Chinese president is ex…


Tweeted by @SomaliaNewsroom https://twitter.com/SomaliaNewsroom/status/961670550757171201

Salaries For Workers in Technology Roles, Including Software Engineers and Product Managers, Peak Around Age 45

A report released on Thursday by the job marketplace Hired reveals that salaries for workers in technology roles, including software engineers, product managers, and data analysts, peak around age 45. After that, earnings level off or drop until retirement. According to the report, the average salary of US technology workers is about $135,000, with the highest pay in the San Francisco area.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Anti-China Bill Being Softened After US Companies Complain

Proposed legislation in Congress aimed at preventing China from acquiring sensitive technology is being softened after protests by big U.S. companies who fear a loss in sales, Reuters reported on Thursday, citing people with knowledge of the matter. From the report: Two bills in the House of Representatives and Senate would broaden the powers of the inter-agency Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) in hopes of stopping Chinese efforts to acquire sophisticated U.S. technology. The bipartisan legislation has the support of President Donald Trump's administration. "We are concerned that it vastly expands the scope and jurisdiction (of CFIUS)," said Nancy McLernon, chief executive of the Organization for International Investment, a group that represents global companies with U.S. operations. Given the alarm that the legislation has caused, Senator John Cornyn's staff is drafting changes to address industry concerns, according to three sources. Cornyn's office did not respond to a request for comment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Artificial Intelligence Act As Key Weapon In The Cyber Security War – Professional Advice From Your LegacyArmour

blog.legacyarmour.com - The whole world is abuzz over the artificial intelligence for the benefit of the mankind. What is it? Well, to illustrate in simple words, artificial intelligence is a computer-aided program that a…


Tweeted by @Legacyarmour https://twitter.com/Legacyarmour/status/961579958052077569

Foxconn Unit To Cut Over 10,000 Jobs As Robotics Take Over

According to Nikkei Asian Review, "Foxconn's panel arm Innolux is planning to slash more than 10,000 jobs this year as part of the company's aggressive efforts to increase the use of automation in manufacturing." Honorary Chairman Tuan Hsing-Chien said in a press conference on Tuesday: "We will reduce our total workforce to less than 50,000 people by the end of this year, from some 60,000 staff at the end of 2017." From the report: Innolux is a liquid crystal display-making affiliate of major iPhone assembler Hon Hai Precision Industry, better known as Foxconn Technology Group. Tuan is also a technology adviser to Foxconn, Sharp and Innolux. Tuan said up to 75% of production will be fully automated by the end of 2018. Most of Innolux's factories are in Taiwan. Tuan's pledge came a few days after Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou said the company would pour in some $342 million to overhaul its manufacturing process by using artificial intelligence.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ripple XRP Announces Yet Another High-Stakes Partnership

Ripple has announced another partnership with an Asian financial institution designed to boost cross-border payments, signaling continued uptake for its native XRP token. LianLian International Joins Ripple Network Hong Kong-based payment provider LianLian International has agreed to adopt xCurrent, Ripple’s enterprise blockchain platform, for the purpose of sending money overseas. LianLian is an active player […]

The post Ripple XRP Announces Yet Another High-Stakes Partnership appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

Bowing To Popularity, Apple Stores In China Accept Alipay

hackingbear writes: Chinese ecommerce giant Alibaba has announced that its mobile wallet app Alipay is to be accepted in physical Apple Stores in the country. This would be the first time Apple has allowed retail store purchases to be made with a third-party mobile wallet app amid a push by the iPhone maker to revive growth in the world's No.2 economy. Apple has had to work hard to promote Apple Pay in China due to the popularity of existing, local mobile wallet apps like WeChat Pat and Alipay. The company had already bowed to the inevitable in allowing local apps to be used for online payments. Other American brands like McDonald's and Starbucks have already started accepting Alipay and WeChat Pay in China for sometimes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Rick Wagner, President of ManTech’s Mission, Cyber & Intel Solutions Group, Named to 2018 Wash100 for Achievement in Counter-intelligence Support Services

govconexec.com - Executive Mosaic is honored to introduce Rick Wagner, president of mission, cyber and intelligence solutions group at ManTech International, as an inductee into the 2018 edition of Wash100 — Executiv…


Tweeted by @GovConWire https://twitter.com/GovConWire/status/961262783902961664

IT Security Professionals Seek a Better Way to Exchange and Consume Cyber Threat Intelligence, According to Third Annual Infoblox Report

prnewswire.com - In a world where cyber criminals are becoming increasingly stealthy and sophisticated—with new threats on the rise ranging from ransomware to DNS hijacking—it is ineffective and costly for companies …


Tweeted by @sacramento_bb https://twitter.com/sacramento_bb/status/961244180298137600

multiyear contract wins for Falanx the global intelligence, security and cyber defence provider – DirectorsTalk

directorstalk.net - Mike Read, Chairman and CEO of Falanx, commented on the contract wins: “I am delighted to report the continuing sales momentum of our highly regarded MidGARD service, further enhancing visibility of …


Tweeted by @DirectorsTalk https://twitter.com/DirectorsTalk/status/961133989296828418

Elon Musk Launches Most Powerful Rocket of a Generation

After years of delays and roughly $1 billion invested, Space Exploration Technology Corp has successfully launched a test flight of its Falcon Heavy rocket. The launch was another major victory for project founder Elon Musk, who overcame numerous obstacles in developing the most powerful rocket in nearly five decades.   Powerful Launch Falcony Heavy launched […]

The post Elon Musk Launches Most Powerful Rocket of a Generation appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

US Startups Don’t Want To Go Public Anymore

According to a new working paper from the National Bureau of Economics, the number of American firms listed publicly in the U.S. has dropped more than half. In 1997, more than 7,500 American firms were listed publicly in the U.S. Nearly two decades later, in 2016, the number had dropped to 3,618 firms. Quartz reports: The crux of the issue is that U.S. startups are increasingly shunning stock market boards. That could have worrying implications for America's long-term economic prospects. One big reason young companies are shying away from IPOs is that public listings don't offer much benefit to promising startups, say the paper's authors, economists Craig Doidge, Kathleen Kahle, Andrew Karolyi, and Rene Stulz. In fact, going public can hurt them. The upside of public listing is that it lets companies raise huge sums of capital, issue more shares, issue debt with relative ease, and use equity to fund acquisitions. But because of the ways the American economy has evolved, those advantages are less important than they once were. When industry powered U.S. growth, companies grew by spending on capital investments like factories and machinery. Back in 1975, firms once spent six times more on capital investments than they did on research and development. But as the U.S. shifted toward a services and knowledge-based economy, intangible investments became increasingly important. In 2002, R&D expenditures for the average firm surpassed capital expenditures for the first time. It's stayed that way since; nowadays, average R&D spending is roughly twice that of capital expenditures. The problem is, two features of public listings -- disclosure and accounting standards -- make things tough on companies with more intangible assets. U.S. securities law requires companies to disclose their activities in detail. But startups are wary of sharing information that might benefit their competitors.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Stephen M. Ross’ RSE Ventures Acquires Oxford Solutions, Renamed Skout Secure Intelligence, Establishing Cyber Security Footprint – Press Release – Digital Journal

digitaljournal.com - Skout focuses on helping companies in the midmarket that are facing the increasing risks of cyber attacks. These companies are often vulnerable, because of the complexity, cost and resources needed f…


Tweeted by @rvp https://twitter.com/rvp/status/960785430261223424

Mazor Robotics: The Next Intuitive Surgical

Conventional wisdom in choppy markets is to avoid high valuation stocks. The volatility will give you nightmares. If properly prepared, volatility can also give you opportunity. In a correction good young companies often see the price of their equity fall more than average. This is what successful investors look for in the overall strategy.  Let […]

The post Mazor Robotics: The Next Intuitive Surgical appeared first on Hacked: Hacking Finance.

Samsung Billionaire Gets Off Easy

Lee Jae-yong, the Samsung chief found guilty of bribery and embezzlement, was freed from prison after an appeals court reduced and suspended his five-year prison sentence. Gizmodo reports: Lee had pleaded not guilty to all charges and spent nearly a year in jail, CNN reported, before the appeals court reduced his sentence to two and a half years and suspended it for four. The court reportedly found him guilty of one bribery charge, but not of hiding money offshore. It also overturned another bribery charge. It's important to understand that Samsung has a tight grip on the country's economy. Known as a "chaebol," or a (usually family-owned) business conglomerate, Samsung contributes to a little over one-fifth of the country's exports. Its businesses make up about 15 percent of the country's total economy. It is extremely rare for leaders of the country's chaebols to be justly punished for their crimes -- most convicted are ultimately pardoned or granted a commutation. Lee's father, Lee Kun-hee, has been pardoned twice for similar charges.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

McAfee Endpoint Security – Why You Don’t Have to Take Our Word for It.

It’s an unfortunate fact that evaluating security vendors today can often mean sifting through a sea of marketing hype to understand which products should be added to your short-list. Exclusive claims about what makes one product different from another may be vague, hard to find or even harder to believe.

That’s why when it comes to our endpoint security platform, McAfee believes the proof is in the product, and that your experience with it will clearly demonstrate the real-world benefits you’re looking for. However, we understand that being invited to your security discussion table depends on a few things like accuracy, trust and reputation. So, rather than make claims of my own, I’m writing this to share what others have had to say so that you don’t have to take our word for it.

First up,  McAfee Endpoint Security (ENS) recently earned a Top Product Award from AV-TEST Institute and scored high detection rates against the threats thrown against it. But that’s not an isolated incident. In fact, here are three more findings by non-McAfee firms on the abilities of ENS to protect, provide value and reliability.

NSS Labs

The NSS Labs Advanced Endpoint Protection (AEP) Test is one of the most exhaustive tests of advanced endpoint defenses in the industry. NSS gave McAfee ENS a Recommended product rating. According to NSS, this “…indicates that a product has performed well and deserves strong consideration. Only the top technical products earn a Recommended rating from NSS.” Coming from a test specifically designed to evaluate how effective a solution is at detecting advanced malware, that should tell you McAfee’s endpoint and machine learning defenses are ready for the best disguised malware you may face.

SC Magazine

Return on investment matters, and you undoubtedly strive to get the best bang for your buck. SC Magazine conducted a product group test of endpoint security systems, awarding McAfee ENS a 5 out of 5-star rating, as well as “Best Buy” in the side by side vendor comparison of products. Further, SC Magazine summarized their findings as, “Solid performance, straightforward operation and tight integration” with “no weakness found” during assessment.

Frost & Sullivan

Frost and Sullivan awarded McAfee with the 2017 Global Endpoint Security Growth Excellence Leadership Award, finding that “McAfee has seen high growth in 2016, at 17.7%, outpacing the overall market. All other top competitors either slipped or were essentially flat.” With ~40 total vendors in view, that not only means that McAfee is growing in a crowded market, but that your peers are continuing to choose to invest in McAfee ENS.

 

At McAfee, we are committed to being your security partner for the long haul. But we don’t want you to just take our word for it. Instead, listen to what others are saying and decide if you can afford to not see how McAfee ENS can help you stop more threats, see more in your environment, manage less and get the return your investment deserves. If you’re a current McAfee customer using McAfee VirusScan Enterprise, McAfee Site Advisor or Host Intrusion Prevention, you already own McAfee ENS. Learn about how to migrate, or download it here.

For more information, follow @McAfee on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The post McAfee Endpoint Security – Why You Don’t Have to Take Our Word for It. appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Apple Music Was Always Going To Win

Apple Music is about to overtake Spotify as the most popular streaming music service in the United States, the Wall Street Journal reported over the weekend. Gizmodo: [...] Here's where the inevitability comes into play. Because all Apple devices come preloaded with Apple Music, countless consumers start using Apple Music without knowing any better. It's effectively become the streaming music analogue of Microsoft pushing people to surf the web with Internet Explorer. The big difference is that people eventually have to pay for Apple Music, which is the same price as Spotify. As many suspected when it launched three years ago, Apple Music was bound to succeed simply because Apple is big enough and rich enough to will it so. Think about it this way: Spotify gained traction quickly after its 2011 launch, largely because music enthusiasts had seen its streaming model succeed globally and wanted to try this neat new thing. After all, there wasn't anything quite like it at the time, and Americans love to feel innovative. But eventually, Spotify would cease to feel special and new. As the years passed, practically every major tech company launched its own music streaming service. And then, in 2015, Apple unveiled Apple Music in 2015 -- which was really just a rebranded version of Beats Music. Because Apple could preload the service on iPhones, Watches, and Macs, the company could effectively tap into a new revenue stream without actually inventing anything.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A New Standard for Security at New Standard Corporation

From the latches on the toolbox in your garage to componentry in gigantic earth movers, New Standard Corporation provides Original Equipment Manufacturer

components, assemblies, and related services for products used in the agriculture, construction, mining, industrial, and power generation industries. As at companies everywhere, New Standard has seen information security move from the back shelf to the boardroom in recent years.

New Standard Network Administrator Chad Johnson has experienced the shift firsthand. “Years ago, I would never hear from the C-suite or a VP about whether we are doing enough to secure our data, prevent loss, and prevent hacking,” attests Johnson, who oversees all facets of networking, infrastructure, and telephony at the company’s three manufacturing facilities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. “The Equifax breach definitely helped raise awareness.”

New Standard Corporation has built a reputation of trust and reliability with major OEMs across multiple industries, so cybersecurity is crucially important to the company. The company’s approach to collaborative engineering and custom OEM manufacturing enables it to offer industry-leading solutions, while taking every measure to ensure complete confidentiality.

That approach has led the company to invest in security infrastructure. New Standard has relied on McAfee® endpoint protection for more than a decade, and recently migrated to McAfee Endpoint Security. The company also added McAfee Web Gateway appliances and McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange,. As a result, Johnson’s day-to-day activities and approach to security have evolved significantly. “Prior to implementing McAfee Endpoint Security and McAfee Web Gateway, our security was essentially event-driven and reactive,” explains Johnson. “We just waited to be notified of an infection on an endpoint.”

“With McAfee Web Gateway filtering at the edge for malware, suspicious content, and web reputation, and with McAfee Endpoint Security and McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange sharing threat information back and forth, we have become much more proactive,” continues Johnson. “We’re now automatically examining file reputation on all endpoints and cross-referencing unknown files with the McAfee GTI cloud. The number of threats that make it to the endpoint has plummeted, as has the amount of time we spend remediating infected systems.”

Managing Security by Exception

“I manage by exception now,” says Johnson, who looks at the McAfee ePolicy Orchestrator® (McAfee ePO™) central console about an hour each day. “I still look at reports daily, and occasionally validate that all the automated responses we’ve put in place with McAfee are working… but incident response has been fantastic. Today most of my time in McAfee ePO is proactive—for instance, looking for file anomalies or potentially suspicious behavior.”

Johnson particularly appreciates the modular architecture of the McAfee Endpoint Security framework introduced last year. “I love the module approach, where you can deploy specific pieces and leverage only what you want,” says Johnson. “Modularity lets us more easily modify our security profile over time. With this platform, we are looking to add a lot of additional functionality and security for our desktop and mobile users.”

With the switch from reactive to more proactive security, New Standard has felt more comfortable embracing bring-your-own-device policies for employees. “We have a lot more peace of mind now regarding users working outside the firewall and on their own devices,” says Johnson.

Looking to the Cloud and Beyond

Looking forward, Johnson is most excited about the company’s upcoming deployment of McAfee Advanced Threat Defense (McAfee ATD) sandboxing appliances and integration with McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange across all endpoints. “Given what I’ve seen [in our testing] so far, I believe McAfee ATD will dramatically reduce our potential risk for a zero-day outbreak,” says Johnson.

Extending endpoint security to the Cloud and leveraging OpenDXL are also on New Standard’s security roadmap. After attending MPOWER, the McAfee user conference in October in Las Vegas, Johnson left excited about the direction McAfee is taking its endpoint security platform and how it is working with other security vendors to mitigate threats for its customers.

For Johnson, the dynamic nature of his job is one of the reasons he keeps coming back to work each day. “You’re always going to be learning in the technology industry,” he says. “It changes year over year,” he says. So, even when the toolbox latch or manufacturing component looks the same as it did the previous year, the security behind them keeps evolving. So does McAfee.

Please watch our video of Chad Johnson talking about his experience with McAfee below. Get your questions answered by tweeting @McAfee_Business.

The post A New Standard for Security at New Standard Corporation appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

McAfee Blogs: A New Standard for Security at New Standard Corporation

From the latches on the toolbox in your garage to componentry in gigantic earth movers, New Standard Corporation provides Original Equipment Manufacturer

components, assemblies, and related services for products used in the agriculture, construction, mining, industrial, and power generation industries. As at companies everywhere, New Standard has seen information security move from the back shelf to the boardroom in recent years.

New Standard Network Administrator Chad Johnson has experienced the shift firsthand. “Years ago, I would never hear from the C-suite or a VP about whether we are doing enough to secure our data, prevent loss, and prevent hacking,” attests Johnson, who oversees all facets of networking, infrastructure, and telephony at the company’s three manufacturing facilities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. “The Equifax breach definitely helped raise awareness.”

New Standard Corporation has built a reputation of trust and reliability with major OEMs across multiple industries, so cybersecurity is crucially important to the company. The company’s approach to collaborative engineering and custom OEM manufacturing enables it to offer industry-leading solutions, while taking every measure to ensure complete confidentiality.

That approach has led the company to invest in security infrastructure. New Standard has relied on McAfee® endpoint protection for more than a decade, and recently migrated to McAfee Endpoint Security. The company also added McAfee Web Gateway appliances and McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange,. As a result, Johnson’s day-to-day activities and approach to security have evolved significantly. “Prior to implementing McAfee Endpoint Security and McAfee Web Gateway, our security was essentially event-driven and reactive,” explains Johnson. “We just waited to be notified of an infection on an endpoint.”

“With McAfee Web Gateway filtering at the edge for malware, suspicious content, and web reputation, and with McAfee Endpoint Security and McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange sharing threat information back and forth, we have become much more proactive,” continues Johnson. “We’re now automatically examining file reputation on all endpoints and cross-referencing unknown files with the McAfee GTI cloud. The number of threats that make it to the endpoint has plummeted, as has the amount of time we spend remediating infected systems.”

Managing Security by Exception

“I manage by exception now,” says Johnson, who looks at the McAfee ePolicy Orchestrator® (McAfee ePO™) central console about an hour each day. “I still look at reports daily, and occasionally validate that all the automated responses we’ve put in place with McAfee are working… but incident response has been fantastic. Today most of my time in McAfee ePO is proactive—for instance, looking for file anomalies or potentially suspicious behavior.”

Johnson particularly appreciates the modular architecture of the McAfee Endpoint Security framework introduced last year. “I love the module approach, where you can deploy specific pieces and leverage only what you want,” says Johnson. “Modularity lets us more easily modify our security profile over time. With this platform, we are looking to add a lot of additional functionality and security for our desktop and mobile users.”

With the switch from reactive to more proactive security, New Standard has felt more comfortable embracing bring-your-own-device policies for employees. “We have a lot more peace of mind now regarding users working outside the firewall and on their own devices,” says Johnson.

Looking to the Cloud and Beyond

Looking forward, Johnson is most excited about the company’s upcoming deployment of McAfee Advanced Threat Defense (McAfee ATD) sandboxing appliances and integration with McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange across all endpoints. “Given what I’ve seen [in our testing] so far, I believe McAfee ATD will dramatically reduce our potential risk for a zero-day outbreak,” says Johnson.

Extending endpoint security to the Cloud and leveraging OpenDXL are also on New Standard’s security roadmap. After attending MPOWER, the McAfee user conference in October in Las Vegas, Johnson left excited about the direction McAfee is taking its endpoint security platform and how it is working with other security vendors to mitigate threats for its customers.

For Johnson, the dynamic nature of his job is one of the reasons he keeps coming back to work each day. “You’re always going to be learning in the technology industry,” he says. “It changes year over year,” he says. So, even when the toolbox latch or manufacturing component looks the same as it did the previous year, the security behind them keeps evolving. So does McAfee.

Please watch our video of Chad Johnson talking about his experience with McAfee below. Get your questions answered by tweeting @McAfee_Business.

The post A New Standard for Security at New Standard Corporation appeared first on McAfee Blogs.



McAfee Blogs

Tablet Shipments Decline For 13th Straight Quarter

The tablet market has now declined year-over-year for 13 quarters straight. From a report: Q4 2017 saw a 7.9 percent year-over-year decline: 49.6 million units shipped worldwide, compared to 53.8 million units in the same quarter last year. The only silver lining is that declines for 2017 haven't been in the double-digits, like they were in 2016.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

US Consumer Protection Official Puts Equifax Probe on Ice

From a report on Reuters: Mick Mulvaney, head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has pulled back from a full-scale probe of how Equifax failed to protect the personal data of millions of consumers, according to people familiar with the matter. Equifax said in September that hackers stole personal data it had collected on some 143 million Americans. Richard Cordray, then the CFPB director, authorized an investigation that month, said former officials familiar with the probe. But Cordray resigned in November and was replaced by Mulvaney, President Donald Trump's budget chief. The CFPB effort against Equifax has sputtered since then, said several government and industry sources, raising questions about how Mulvaney will police a data-warehousing industry that has enormous sway over how much consumers pay to borrow money. The CFPB has the tools to examine a data breach like Equifax, said John Czwartacki, a spokesman, but the agency is not permitted to acknowledge an open investigation. "The bureau has the desire, expertise, and know-how in-house to vigorously pursue hypothetical matters such as these," he said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New Digital Technology Can, in Some Circumstances, Make Businesses Less Productive

In a poll of 20,000 European workers released Monday, Microsoft, which became one of the world's most profitable companies by marketing office productivity software, acknowledges new digital technology can, in some circumstances, make businesses less productive. From a report: Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft joins a growing number of prominent Silicon Valley companies and entrepreneurs that are starting to question the social benefits of the technology they once championed. Facebook warned in December that its social network might, in some cases, cause psychological harm. Microsoft identifies a number of possible reasons for this negative impact, including: workers who are too distracted by a constant influx of e-mails, Slack messages, Trello notifications, texts, Tweets -- not to mention viral cat videos -- to concentrate for sustained periods; workers who aren't properly trained to use the new technology effectively; tech that isn't adequately supported by the business, forcing workers to lose time because "the computers are down;" and workers who suffer burnout because, with mobile devices and at-home-working, they feel tethered to the job around-the-clock.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Stephen M. Ross’ RSE Ventures Acquires Oxford Solutions, Renamed Skout Secure Intelligence, Establishing Cyber Security Footprint

businesswire.com - NEW YORK--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--Oxford Solutions, a leading global cyber security company, announced today the completion of its acquisition by Stephen M. Ross’ RSE Ventures. The acquisition e…


Tweeted by @EON_ProServices https://twitter.com/EON_ProServices/status/960500846059401216

Global Threat Intelligence Market Development by 2026: LogRhythm, Looking Glass Cyber Solutions, Trend Micro Incorporated – News of Industry

newsofindustry.com - MarketResearch.biz, in its upcoming report titled “Global Threat Intelligence Market Threats, Analysis, Key Players, Growth, and Forecast 2026”, delivers in-depth insights on global Threat Intelligen…


Tweeted by @SecurityToday https://twitter.com/SecurityToday/status/960459505191415808

Wells Fargo Hit With ‘Unprecedented’ Punishment Over Fake Accounts

An anonymous reader quotes CNN: The Federal Reserve has dropped the hammer on Wells Fargo, [handing] down unprecedented punishment late Friday for what it called the bank's "widespread consumer abuses," including its notorious creation of millions of fake customer accounts. Wells Fargo won't be allowed to get any bigger than it was at the end of last year -- $2 trillion in assets -- until the Fed is satisfied that it has cleaned up its act. Under pressure from the Fed, the bank agreed to remove three people from the board of directors by April and a fourth by the end of the year. It is the first time the Federal Reserve has imposed a cap on the entire assets of a financial institution, according to a Fed official. "We cannot tolerate pervasive and persistent misconduct at any bank," outgoing Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen said in a statement. Friday was her last day on the job.... Wells Fargo admitted that its workers responded to wildly unrealistic sales goals by creating as many as 3.5 million fake accounts. The bank has also said it forced up to 570,000 customers into unneeded auto insurance... About 20,000 of those customers had their cars wrongfully repossessed in part due to these unwanted insurance charges. In August, Wells Fargo was sued by small business owners who say the bank used deceptive language to dupe mom-and-pop businesses into paying "massive early termination fees." The company was in the headlines again in October for charging about 110,000 mortgage borrowers undue fees. One U.S. congressman argued that the harsh penalty "demonstrates that we have the tools to rein in Wall Street -- if our regulators have the guts to use them." Wells Fargo has also spent $3.3 billion on legal bills in just the last three months of 2017.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Elon Musk Sells $10 Million in Flamethrowers in Four Days

An anonymous reader quotes Reuters: A handful of tweets and four days later, Silicon Valley billionaire Elon Musk has closed orders for his latest novelty product, after selling 20,000 flamethrowers at $500 a piece. "Guaranteed to liven up any party!" was Musk's tagline for a sale which raised $10 million for his high-speed tunnel venture The Boring Company... "When the zombie apocalypse happens, you'll be glad you bought a flamethrower," he tweeted last Saturday. "Works against hordes of the undead or your money back!" The fundraising comes as Tesla "struggles" meet its production commitments, notes the article, adding that analysts are wondering if the car manufacturer will eventually need billions more in funding. By Wednesday Musk had sold out his entire suppy of flamethrowers, though "Apparently, some customs agencies are saying they won't allow shipment of anything called a 'Flamethrower'," Musk tweeted Friday night, adding "To solve this, we are renaming it 'Not a Flamethrower'." "Or maybe 'Temperature Enhancement Device.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Working From Home: What if You Never Saw Your Colleagues in Person Again?

Bryan Lufkin, writing for BBC: Throughout my career I've worked with people that I've never met in person. In theory, I could spend an entire day without meeting another human face-to-face. But could this kind of self-imposed isolation become standard working practice in the future? Studies show that in the US, the number of telecommuters rose 115% between 2005 and 2017. And in early 2015, around 500,000 people used Slack, the real-time chat room programme, daily. By last September, that number soared to over 6 million. In 2017 a Gallup poll revealed that 43% of 15,000 Americans say they spend at least some of their time working remotely, a 4% rise from 2012. And a 2015 YouGov study found that 30% of UK office workers say they feel more productive when they work outside their workplace. How would we feel if we never had to work with another person face-to-face again? Would we care? Have things gone so far that we might not even notice?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Shipping cyberattacks threat is growing

shipinsight.com - To some it’s considered a non-issue but cyber attacks are starting to hit the shipping industry and the concerns are beginning to mount. In a digital age, any individual or organisation that makes us…


Tweeted by @BassimH https://twitter.com/BassimH/status/959435154098925570

How DIY Rebels Are Working To Replace Tech Giants

mspohr shares an excerpt from an "interesting article about groups working to make a safer internet": Balkan and Kalbag form one small part of a fragmented rebellion whose prime movers tend to be located a long way from Silicon Valley. These people often talk in withering terms about Big Tech titans such as Mark Zuckerberg, and pay glowing tribute to Edward Snowden. Their politics vary, but they all have a deep dislike of large concentrations of power and a belief in the kind of egalitarian, pluralistic ideas they say the internet initially embodied. What they are doing could be seen as the online world's equivalent of punk rock: a scattered revolt against an industry that many now think has grown greedy, intrusive and arrogant -- as well as governments whose surveillance programs have fueled the same anxieties. As concerns grow about an online realm dominated by a few huge corporations, everyone involved shares one common goal: a comprehensively decentralized internet. Balkan energetically travels the world, delivering TED-esque talks with such titles as "Free is a Lie" and "Avoiding Digital Feudalism." [David Irvine, computer engineer and founder of MaidSafe, has devised an alternative to the "modern internet" he calls the Safe network]: the acronym stands for "Safe Access for Everyone." In this model, rather than being stored on distant servers, people's data -- files, documents, social-media interactions -- will be broken into fragments, encrypted and scattered around other people's computers and smartphones, meaning that hacking and data theft will become impossible. Thanks to a system of self-authentication in which a Safe user's encrypted information would only be put back together and unlocked on their own devices, there will be no centrally held passwords. No one will leave data trails, so there will be nothing for big online companies to harvest. The financial lubricant, Irvine says, will be a cryptocurrency called Safecoin: users will pay to store data on the network, and also be rewarded for storing other people's (encrypted) information on their devices. Software developers, meanwhile, will be rewarded with Safecoin according to the popularity of their apps. There is a community of around 7,000 interested people already working on services that will work on the Safe network, including alternatives to platforms such as Facebook and YouTube.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: Which Tech Company Do You Respect Most?

dryriver writes: On Slashdot, we often discuss the missteps and non consumer-friendly behavior of various tech companies. This company forced people into a subscription payment model. That tech company doesn't respect people's privacy. Yet another tech company failed to fix a dangerous exploit quickly, protect people's cloud data properly, or innovate and improve where innovation and improvement was badly needed. Here's a question to the contrary: Of all the tech companies you know well and follow -- small, medium, or large -- which are the ones that you respect the most, and why? Which are the companies that still -- or newly -- create great tech in a landscape dotted with profiteers? Also, what is your personal criteria for judging whether a tech company is "good," "neutral," or "bad?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: What Tech Company Do You Respect Most?

dryriver writes: On Slashdot, we often discuss the missteps and non consumer-friendly behavior of various tech companies. This company forced people into a subscription payment model. That tech company doesn't respect people's privacy. Yet another tech company failed to fix a dangerous exploit quickly, protect people's cloud data properly, or innovate and improve where innovation and improvement was badly needed. Here's a question to the contrary: Of all the tech companies you know well and follow -- small, medium, or large -- which are the ones that you respect the most, and why? Which are the companies that still -- or newly -- create great tech in a landscape dotted with profiteers? Also, what is your personal criteria for judging whether a tech company is "good," "neutral," or "bad?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Xerox Cedes Control To Fujifilm, Ending Its Independence

mikeebbbd writes: According to Bloomberg, "Xerox, a once-iconic American innovator that became synonymous with office copy machines, is ceding control to Japan's Fujifilm in a deal that creates an $18 billion company." Essentially, it's merging with Fujifilm; a former joint venture operating in the Asian-Pacific area essentially will become the parent company... So much for the company that actually invented the modern graphical user interface later popularized by Apple and Microsoft. "The agreement marks the end of independence for a U.S. company whose roots trace back to the start of the 20th century," reports Bloomberg. "The joint venture will cut 10,000 jobs in Asia as part of the restructuring as the Japanese company struggles with an 'increasingly severe' market environment." While the new company will have a combined revenue of $18 billion, Xerox was acquired by Fujifilm for $6.1 billion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google officially closes HTC deal of $1.1 billion

Google completes HTC’s smartphone deal of $1.1 billion

In September 2017, Google had officially closed a $1.1 billion deal with the Taiwanese OEM HTC Corp. to acquire most of HTC’s smartphone design division.

Back then, Rick Osterloh, Google’s Senior Vice President for Hardware in a blog post had said, “We’ve signed an agreement with HTC, a leader in consumer electronics that will fuel even more product innovation in the years ahead. With this agreement, a team of HTC talent will join Google as part of the hardware organization. These future fellow Googlers are amazing folks we’ve already been working with closely on the Pixel smartphone line, and we’re excited to see what we can do together as one team.”

Fast forward to January 2018, Osterloh has officially confirmed the completion of the $1.1 billion deal with HTC in a blog post. “I’m delighted that we’ve officially closed our deal with HTC, and are welcoming an incredibly talented team to work on even better and more innovative products in the years to come,” he said.

He added, “These new colleagues bring decades of experience achieving a series of “firsts” particularly in the smartphone industry—including bringing to market the first 3G smartphone in 2005, the first touch-centric phone in 2007, and the first all-metal unibody phone in 2013. This is also the same team we’ve been working closely with on the development of the Pixel and Pixel 2.”

The deal involves Google acquiring more than 2,000 HTC engineers who will be joining the company’s Taiwan division, which Osterloh says is the “key innovation and engineering hub for Google.” The search giant has also acquired non-exclusive licenses to HTC’s intellectual property. Also, the expansion will make the Taipei-based unit grow its footprint in the Asia Pacific region.

Further, the deal will help Google stride deeper with its new teammates to improve the experiences for its users around the world by designing its own consumer hardware, artificial intelligence, and software.

Osterloh also hinted that Google will continue to expand its smartphone business following the Pixel series launched last year as ‘made by Google’ phones.

“We’re focused on building our core capabilities, while creating a portfolio of products that offers people a unique yet delightful experience only made possible by bringing together the best of Google software—like the Google Assistant—with thoughtfully designed hardware,” he said.

On the other hand, HTC said that it will continue to produce handsets and concentrate its efforts on its next flagship smartphone. “Today marks the beginning of an exciting new chapter at HTC as we continue to drive innovation in our branded smartphone and VIVE virtual reality businesses,” Cher Wang, chairwoman at HTC said in a statement.

The post Google officially closes HTC deal of $1.1 billion appeared first on TechWorm.

Anomali | Switzerland First Nation to Unveil Threat Intelligence Sharing Group, Powered by Anomali and Security Interest Group Switzerland

realwire.com - Seamless, secure threat sharing accelerates knowledge and enables quicker responses to new cyber security attacks across Switzerland LONDON, UK. – [31st January, 2018] – Anomali, the leading provider…


Tweeted by @rwInfoTech https://twitter.com/rwInfoTech/status/958707045108199425

T-Mobile Commits To 100 Percent Renewable Electricity By 2021

T-Mobile said on Monday that it will move to 100 percent renewable electricity by the year 2021. It had also "finalized a contract for wind power from the Solomon Forks Wind Project in Kansas," reports CNBC. "Power generation there is due to begin at the beginning of 2019, and will supplement the energy T-Mobile receives from the Red Dirt Wind Power Project in Oklahoma." From the report: John Legere, T-Mobile's president and CEO, said moving to renewable energy was the right thing to do and smart business. "We expect to cut T-Mobile's energy costs by around $100 million in the next 15 years thanks to this move," he added. T-Mobile has also joined the RE100, a group of global businesses committed to renewable power. Other members of the RE100 include Apple, Facebook and Google.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Amazon’s Push Into Healthcare Just Cost the Industry $30 Billion In Market Cap

Today, Amazon, along with Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan, announced a plan to launch an independent company that will offer healthcare services to the companies' employees at a lower cost. The venture, which will be managed by executives from the firms, will be run more like a non-profit, than a for-profit entity. Even though the plans are vague, the news caused the market value of 10 large, listed health insurance and pharmacy stocks to drop by a combined $30 billion in the first two hours of trading. Quartz reports: "The healthcare system is complex, and we enter into this challenge open-eyed about the degree of difficulty," said Amazon's Jeff Bezos in a statement. "Hard as it might be, reducing healthcare's burden on the economy while improving outcomes for employees and their families would be worth the effort. Success is going to require talented experts, a beginner's mind, and a long-term orientation." Warren Buffett, the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, likened America's mushrooming healthcare costs to "a hungry tapeworm on the American economy." How the venture will provide less pricy healthcare to the 1.2 million employees of the participating companies isn't yet clear. The new company will leverage "technology solutions" that provide "simplified, high-quality and transparent healthcare at a reasonable cost." Not much else, including the name of the company, is known.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.