Category Archives: Brexit

Webinar Recap: Current State of Brexit and Data Protection Impact

In a special webinar event, TrustArc Senior Privacy Consultant Ralph O’Brien presented “Current State of Brexit and Data Protection Impact.”  This blog post will give a brief summary of that webinar; you can listen to the entire webinar and download the slides here. The impact of a potential “Brexit” will play an important role on the data protection strategy of many companies and a lot will depend on what is decided in the next few days and weeks. This is why understanding the current state of Brexit is so critical right now. You will learn in this on-demand webinar: What … Continue reading Webinar Recap: Current State of Brexit and Data Protection Impact

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Special Webinar Event: Current State of Brexit and Data Protection Impact

TrustArc is proud to present a special webinar event: “Current State of Brexit and Data Protection Impact.” This webinar will take place this Thursday, March 28th at 12pm GMT | 8am ET | 5am PT. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn more about how Brexit will affect data protection – register today! Can’t make it? Register anyway – we’ll automatically send you an email with both the slides and recording after the webinar! Click here for answers to the most commonly asked webinar related questions. The impact of a potential “Brexit” will play an important role on the data protection … Continue reading Special Webinar Event: Current State of Brexit and Data Protection Impact

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Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security?

On 19th July 2018 the UK government, through the GCHQ backed Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, gave “limited assurance” that Huawei poses no threat to UK National Security. Since then the UK, EU, and NATO member government politicians and security services have all raised concerns about the nation-state cyber threat posed by the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei. 

There has been particular political unease around the Huawei provision of network infrastructure devices (i.e. switches and routers etc.) within the UK national infrastructure, devices which controls network traffic and capable of accessing the data that traverses them. Huawei has been operating in the UK market for 18 years, whether its their smart phones or a network devices, Huawei products are generally far cheaper than their competitors' equivalents. This has led to major telecoms providers such as BT, purchasing and implementing Huawei network devices within their telecommunications infrastructure and data centres, some of which are regarded as critical components within the UK national infrastructure. As such, Huawei has been subject to unfavourable security scrutiny, which has recently spilt out into political and media arenas. 


Huawei has always denied its products poses a threat, and there is no evidence of any malicious capability or activity publicly disclosure by any UK intelligence agencies or cyber security firms. But there is also the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, which states that Chinese organisations are obliged to "support, cooperate with, and collaborate in, national intelligence work".

Three nations in the intelligence alliance ‘Five Eyes’, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have effectively prohibited the installation of Huawei equipment within their generation telecommunications equipment, namely 5G networks. The remaining two members of "Five Eyes", the United Kingdom and Canada, are expected to state their position within the coming months. The UK's National Cyber Security Centre has published warnings about the Chinese company's security standards. Elsewhere, nations including France, Germany and India have expressed their concerns about the use of Huawei equipment within their telecommunications 5G upgrades.


On 4th February, a leaked draft 'Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre' 2019 report, said the issues and findings it had raised previously had not been fully addressed by Huawei, and was critical about the security of Huawei's technology.

Then on 6th February 2019,  a letter sent to MPs by Huawei was published. In it Huawei said it could take up to five years to address security issues raised by the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, at a cost of $2bn (£1.5bn) of their own money. The president of Huawei's carrier business group also said the process of adapting its software and engineering processes to meet the UK's requirements was "like replacing components on a high-speed train in motion".

Huawei also made the following points in the letter to rebut the threat allegations,  "Huawei is a closely watched company.  Were Huawei ever to engage in malicious behaviour, it would not go unnoticed - and it would certainly destroy our business. For us, it is a matter of security or nothing; there is no third option. We choose to ensure security." The letter also addressed the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, stating "no Chinese law obliges any company to install backdoors", a position they have backed up by an international law firm based in London. The letter went on to say that Huawei would refuse requests by the Chinese government to plant backdoors, eavesdropping or spyware on its telecommunications equipment.

The ball is now in the UK government's court, in the next couple of months we shall see if the UK Gov bans Huawei or continues to work with them to help assure the implied national security threat of their products. A ban could well result in Huawei pulling out of the UK market altogether, taking their billions of pounds of investment with them, and would likely negatively impact post Brexit trade deal negotiations between the UK and China, so we can expect the situation to become even more political in the short term.

Huawei Threat News Timeline
Who are Huawei?
  • Chinese multinational conglomerate which specialises in telecommunications equipment, consumer electronics and technology-based services and products.
  • HQ in Shenzhen, Guangdong
  • Founded in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the People's Liberation Army
  • Largest telecommunications-equipment manufacturer in the world
  • Overtook from Apple in 2018 as the second-largest manufacturer of smartphones in the world
  • 72nd on the Fortune Global 500 list
  • 180,000 employees
  • Chinese military remain an important customer for Huawei
  • Invests Billions into R&D around world
  • 3 Billions Customers Globally
  • Operating within the UK for 18 years
  • Made a five year commitment (2018 to 2023) to invest £3 billion in the UK.
  • Allegations its equipment may contain backdoors to allow unauthorised surveillance and/or data theft by the Chinese government and the People’s Liberation Army
The 5G Evolution
5G is expected emerge in the UK in late 2019 and early 2020, and will be much faster than 4G. The theoretical maximum speed for 4G is 1Gbps, while the theoretical maximum speed for 5G is 20Gbps, so 5G is potentially up to 20 times faster than 4G. Potentially faster than the UK average broadband speed, which stands at 18.57Gbps.

Mobile networks are changing with the arrival of 5G and the impact of this change will be felt across the industry. Adrian Taylor, regional VP of sales for A10 Networks, provides the follow insight about the impact of 5G on the market and how it will change the enterprise world.

5G and the Evolution of Mobile Networks
Fifth generation networks, just like the preceding 4G LTE and WiMAX networks, are expected to greatly increase available bandwidth, with improved end-to-end performance providing a better end-user experience. In the most basic of terms, 4G LTE was the long-term evolution of Radio Access Networks (RAN); 5G is the next iteration.

Wireless carriers have invested billions into their networks to support the ongoing demand for faster network speeds. They must look for ways to increase revenue while delivering more value to the end user. This continues to drive new devices into the hands of the consumer. The demand for increased efficiencies, bandwidth, and coverage has pushed carriers towards a decentralised deployment model.

Network Virtualisation Remains in The Early Stages
Service providers monitor and review technology for advancements that will help deliver faster and less expensive networks. Recently, they have looked into areas of Network Function Virtualisation (NFV) and automation to support their advancements. Mobile network operators are investing heavily in reducing delays and errors through repetitive processes as they build and add capacity to existing 4G networks.

Virtualisation and Software Defined Networks (SDN) improvements are driving a shift from hardware to software. SDN is promising, but it’s not an instant solution, as purpose-built hardware still remains the preferred choice. NFV and SDN have offered service providers an alternative to existing methods, including dedicated appliances sitting idle. However, it’s safe to say that the age of virtualisation remains in the early stages.


Hardware manufacturers and service providers are now betting on the acceptance and success of virtualised functions. Software development continues at breakneck speed to meet timelines and demands for more integrated solutions, which easily scale and reduce operational overheads at the same time.

The 5G Revenue Opportunity
5G’s impact is expected to extend beyond the typical mobile network carriers/operators such as Virgin Media, EE, O2, and Sky in the UK and overseas. It promises to enable increased connectivity and flexibility, that will drive additional functions throughout all supportive components of a mobile carrier’s network.

RAN access providers face the question of how to support the ever-increasing appetite for cutting the cord. How can we use our mobile devices in more ways than previously thought, as the end user goes about their daily tasks? This mobility, whether it’s tied to a carrier’s technology or even a simple Wi-Fi home network, reaches all corners of our day-to-day life.

This reach extends from the cloud to the data centre environments and continues to drive capacity needs, supported by both legacy appliances and the ever-increasing virtual environments. This continued appetite for consumption has opened up opportunities for all facets of technology and associated vendors.

5G Mobile Network Evolution
The continued expansion of 5G networks will have a revolutionary impact upon every mobile subscriber and business in the world.

The fundamental market forces of network evolution are not based on wired or wireless infrastructure. Companies are currently focused on upgrading existing mobile networks. Whereas at the exact same time, NFV, SDN and the global IoT industry are all preparing to utilise the next generation of mobile networks.

Software solutions are easier to move from concept to production and frequently offer a lower up-front investment cost. This all adds up to help drive increased functionality for all service providers, including the wired infrastructure.

5G and IoT will be demand-driven. As a result, the more the infrastructure expands to meet that demand, the more opportunities will be uncovered. It’s a positive feedback loop that will revolutionise how we think of the internet.

Get ready for a world that will be changed forever with the next generation mobile networks on the horizon.

      Cyber Security Roundup for December 2018

      The final Cyber Security Roundup of 2018 concludes reports of major data breaches, serious software vulnerabilities and evolving cyber threats, so pretty much like the previous 11 months of the year.

      5.3 millions users of "make your own avatar" app Boomoji had their accounts compromised, after the company reportedly didn't secure their internet connected databases properly. "Question and Answer" website Quora also announced the compromise of 100 million of its user accounts following a hack.


      A large data breach reported in Brazil is of interest, a massive 120 million Brazilian citizens personal records were compromised due to a poorly secured Amazon S3 bucket. This is not the first mass data breach caused by an insecure S3 bucket we've seen in 2018, the lesson to be learnt in the UK, is to never assume or take cloud security for granted, its essential practice to test and audit cloud services regularly.

      Amongst the amazing and intriguing space exploration successes reported by NASA in December, the space agency announced its employee's personal data may had been compromised. Lets hope poor security doesn't jeopardise the great and highly expensive work NASA are undertaking.  
      NASA InSight Lander arrives on Mars 

      It wouldn't be normal for Facebook not to be in the headlines for poor privacy, this time Facebook announced a Photo API bug which exposed 6.8 million user images

      Away from the political circus that is Brexit, the European Parliament put into a law a new Cybersecurity Act. Because of the Brexit making all the headlines, this new law may have gone under the radar, but it certainly worth keeping an eye on, even after UK leaves the EU. The EU Parliament has agreed to increase the budget for the ENISA (Network & InfoSec) agency, which will be rebranded as the "EU Agency for Cybersecurity". The Cybersecurity Act will establish an EU wide framework for cyber-security certifications for online services and customer devices to be used within the European Economic Area, and will include IoT devices and critical infrastructure technology. Knowing the EU's love of regulations, I suspect these new best practice framework and associated accreditations to be turned into regulations further down the line, which would impact any tech business operating in European Union.

      The UK Parliament enacted the "The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act", which also went under the radar due to all the Brexit political noise. The act requires the appointment of a data guardian within England and Wales. The data guardian will publish guidance on the processing of health and adult social care data for use by public bodies providing health or social care services, and produce an annual report.

      Chinese telecoms giant Huawei had plenty of negative media coverage throughout December, with UK government pressuring BT into not using Huawei kit within BT's new 5G network, due to a perceived threat to UK's future critical national infrastructure posed by the Chinese stated-backed tech giant.  The UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said he had "very deep concerns" about Huawei being involved in new UK mobile network.
      Security company Insinia cause controversy after it took over the Twitter accounts by Eamon Holmes, Louis Theroux and several others celebs. Insinia said it had managed the account takeover by analysing the way Twitter handles messages posted by phone, to inject messages onto the targeted accounts by analysing the way the social network interacted with smartphones when messages are sent. However, Insinia were accused of being unethical and breaking the UK Computer Misuse Act in some quarters.

      Unsecured internet connected printers are being hacked again, this time they were used to sent print out messages of support for Swedish YouTube star PewDiePie. A hacker named TheHackerGiraffe was said to have targeted up 50,000 printers after using Shodan to search for open printer ports online, the scan was said to have found 800,000 vulnerable printers.

      An Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) report warned UK banks about their over-reliance on third-party security providers. The FCA said companies "generally lacked board members with strong familiarity or specific technical cyber-expertise. External expertise may be helpful but may also, if overly relied on, undermine the effectiveness of the ‘three lines of defence’ model in identifying and managing cyber-risks in a timely way. The report also warned about supply-chain security, especially the role that firms play in other organisations’ supply chains.

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