Category Archives: arrested

8 more people arrested and 2 hit by train while playing PUBG in India

2 People Hit By Train While Playing PUBG In India In Another Incident

Recently, we reported that Gujarat police had arrested 10 people for playing the popular battle royale game, PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (PUBG) on their smartphones in the public place after the ban.

For those unaware, the Gujarat government had earlier this month announced a ban on playing PUBG mobile game in public in Surat and Rajkot. The ban was implemented on March 9 and would be in effect till April 30. The notification issued mentioned that the game was having a negative impact on children and youth, as well as on their overall behavior, conduct, and language.

Now, fresh reports of eight more people being arrested by the police for playing the game have come to light, of which seven are reported to be students. All the eight arrested people were booked under Sections 188 and 35 of the Indian Penal Code. However, they were later granted bail at the police stations concerned, the police said.

In another incident, two men engrossed in playing PUBG game were knocked down by a train in Hingoli district in Maharashtra on Saturday evening, suggests a new report. The accident took place at Khatkali Bypass in Hingoli district in Maharashtra, a senior official said.

“Nagesh Gore (24) and Swapnil Annapurne (22) were playing PUBG near the railway tracks. They were run over by the Hyderabad-Ajmer train. Their bodies were found late at night by people living in the vicinity,” he said.

A case of accidental death has been registered at Hingoli police station, he added.

With the growing number incidents related to PUBG online game, the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) has requested MeitY (Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology) to take stringent actions against the game, suggests a report.

PUBG Mobile game in India has released a statement on the issue in response to a series of ban requests and arrests. It stated that it will be working with the government to resolve this issue.

“PUBG MOBILE is a game. It is meant merely for entertainment and should be enjoyed in a healthy and responsible manner. In consonance with our endeavor to continue promoting responsible gaming experience, we are working on the introduction of a healthy gameplay system in India to promote balanced, responsible gaming, including limiting play time for under-aged players. We were thus surprised to learn that local authorities in a few cities have decided to impose a ban on playing our game. We are working to understand the legal basis of such bans, and hope we can have a constructive dialogue with relevant authorities to explain our objectives and that they withdraw the prohibition. To PUBG MOBILE players, we want to assure you that we are on your side and we will try our best to find a reasonable solution.”

Do you think PUBG mobile game should be banned in India? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

The post 8 more people arrested and 2 hit by train while playing PUBG in India appeared first on TechWorm.

18-year-old hacker arrested for stealing over $130k in cryptocurrency

Japanese teenager gets arrested for stealing over $130k in cryptocurrency

An 18-year-old Japanese teenager has been arrested for stealing roughly 15 million Yen ($134,310) worth of MonaCoin virtual currency.

For those unaware, Monappy is an online wallet service for storing cryptocurrency and the virtual currency MonaCoin (MONA) is Litecoin hard fork.

The boy, a minor from Utsunomiya, Tochigi Prefecture, north of Tokyo, is facing computer fraud and concealment of criminal proceeds charges, reports Japan Times. According to the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department (MPD), this is the first ever case in Japan where a hacker is facing criminal charges for stealing cryptocurrencies.

As reported by Japan Times, the teenager allegedly breached a vulnerability of Monappy and stole 93078.7316 MonaCoins from 7735 Monappy users between August 14 and September 1, 2018 last year. For the hack, he used a smartphone and software called Tor for internet anonymity to access the websites. However, the police were able to track him down after analyzing the cryptocurrency transaction details left on the hacked website’s server.

The boy who confessed being behind the Monappy attacks was quoted by the police as saying “I felt like I’d found a trick no one knows and did it as if I were playing a video game.”

The hacker exploited one of the features of the website that allows users to transfer the currency to another user. Apparently, the wallet was experiencing numerous glitches caused by the site overload. The teenager was fully aware that the system would breakdown if transfers were repeated over a short period of time. As a result, he took advantage of the flaw and submitted repeated currency transfer requests to himself, overwhelming the system and allowing him to register more money in his account.

He then put the stolen MonaCoin in an anonymous, dividend-bearing account at a cryptocurrency exchange overseas. By the time of his arrest, he had collected 100,000 Yen in dividends, which he had used to purchase smartphones and other items, the police said.

The stolen MonaCoins were kept using a system with an always-on internet connection, and those kept offline were not stolen, said the operator of Monappy. More than 7,000 users were affected due to the hack but the platform has accepted to repay them.

The official website of Monappy currently states that they have suspended their services “due to external attacks.”

The post 18-year-old hacker arrested for stealing over $130k in cryptocurrency appeared first on TechWorm.

Memphis BEC Scammers Arrested and At Large

The FBI announced another round of Business Email Compromise arrests this past week.  This time, a focus was in Memphis, Tennessee.  According to the Western District of Tennessee Press Release, "Eight Arrested in Africa-Based Cybercrime and Business Email Compromise Conspiracy", the individuals involved stole more than $15 Million!

The main indictment, originally filed in August 2017, charges 11 individuals with a variety of offenses related to their Business Email Compromise [BEC] crimes.


Count 1: 18 USC §1349.F - Attempt and Conspiracy to Commit Mail Fraud - penalties of up 20 years in prison and fines of up to $250,000, plus supervised release for up to 3 years.

Counts 2-8: 18 USC §1343.F - Fraud by Wire, Radio, or Television - penalties of up to 20 years in prison and fines of up to $250,000, plus supervised release for up to 3 years.

Count 9: 18 USC §§1956-4390.F - Money Laundering - Embezzlement, Other - penalties of up to 20 years in prison and fines of up to $500,000, plus supervised release for up to 3 years.

Count 10: 18 USC §371.F - Conspiracy to Defraud the United States - penalties of up to 5 years in prison and fines of up to $250,000, plus supervised release for up to 1 year.

Count 11-14: 18 USC §10288.A.F - Fraud with Identification Documents + Aggravated Identity Theft - 2 years incarceration consecutive to any other sentence imposed, plus fines of not more than $250,000.

1. Babatunde Martins (Counts 1,9,10,11)
2. Victor Daniel Fortune Okorhi (Counts 1,9,10)
3. Benard Emurhowhoariogho Okorkhi (Counts 1, 2, 3, 9, 10)
4. Maxwell Peter (Counts 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14)
5. Dennis Miah - (Counts 1,9,10,11,13)
6. Sumaila Hardi Wumpini - (Counts 1,9,10)
7. Olufolajimi Abegunde (USM # 71343-019), (Counts 1,9,12)
8. Ayodeji Olumide Ojo (Counts 1,9,12)
9. Dana Brady (Counts 1,9)
10. James Dean (USM # 52637-076)  (Counts 1,9)
11. Javier Luis Ramos Alonso, 28,  (USM #24513-111) (Counts 1, 5, 9, 12)

In a separate indictment, Rashid Abdulai, was charged for much of the same, but with his key role being controlling five TD Bank accounts that were used to launder funds.

The primary victim in this case seems to be "Company A", a real estate company in Memphis, who is foolishly identified in the indictment through the carelessness of the author.  I've chosen to redact myself on that, but DAMN!  When you describe the company in such a way that there is exactly one such company on planet earth, you are failing to keep the faith of your victim companies.  Shame!

Fortunately, the indictment also shares a lot of details on the defendants:

RASHID ABDULAI, age 24
a citizen of Ghana, residing in Bronx, New York
controlled at least five TD Bank accounts

BABATUNDE MARTINS, age 62
email: papamart2000@yahoo.com
Company: Afriocean LTD
Nigerian citizen living in Ghana

VICTOR DANIEL FORTUNE OKORHI, age 35 -  *** STILL AT LARGE AND WANTED***
emails:  vicfoko@yahoo.com, VicdarycorriLTD@gmail.com, vicdarycomltd@icloud.com
Company: Vicdary Company LTD
Nigerian citizen living in Ghana

BENARD EMURHOWWHOARIOGHO OKORHI, age 39
emails: Marc.Richards@aol.com, benardokorhi@yahoo.com
Company: Coolben Royal Links LTD
Nigerian citizen living in Ghana

MAXWELL ATUGBA ABAYETA (AKA Peter Maxwell, AKA Maxwell Peter ), age 26
emails: petermaxwell200@gmail.com, sandarlin200@yahoo.com
social accounts: Facebook.com/maxwell.peter.5688
citizen of Ghana

DENNIS MIAH (aka Dennis Brown, AKA Dr. Den Brown), age 34 -  *** STILL AT LARGE AND WANTED***
 emails: JimRoyAirSeal1@yahoo.com, drdenbrown@yahoo.com
social accounts: Facebook.com/Oga.Bossson, Twitter.com/Oga.Bossson
citizen of Ghana

SUMAILA HARDI WUMPINI, age 29 - *** STILL AT LARGE AND WANTED***
email: hardi765_new@hotmail.com
social accounts: Facebook.com/Wumpini.Hardy
resident of Ghana

OLUFOLAJIMI ABEGUNDE, age 31
Nigerian citizen residing in Atlanta, Georgia

AYODEJI OLUMIDE OJO, age 35 -  *** STILL AT LARGE AND WANTED***
Nigerian citizen, lives with ABEGUNDE in Atlanta when in United States

DANA BRADY, aged 61
emails: bradydana50@gmail.com
US Citizen residing in Auburn, Washington

JAMES DEAN, aged 65
US Citizen, residing in Plainfield, Indiana

JAVIER LUIS RAMOS ALONSO, aged 28
Mexican citizen, residing in Seaside, California

D. G. -
emails: d2t2green696@gmail.com, d2t2green696@yahoo.com
US Citizen residing in Mississippi

J.R.
emails: LRIGNWM@yahoo.com
US Citizen residing in New Jersey

M.Z.
emails: CMIMIGO@aol.com
US Citizen residing in Utah

T.W. - US Citizen residing in Tennessee
J.B. - US Citizen residing in Alabama
C.M. - US Citizen residing in Tennessee (Western District)
C.W. - US Citizen residing in Tennessee
A.K. - US Citizen residing in Tennessee (Western District)
V.M. - US Citizen residing in Georgia

How It Worked

Martins, Maxwell, Bernard Okorhi, Victor Okorhi, and/or Miah would get the IP addresses of potentially vulnerable email servers and target them for intrusion.  Using US based IP addresses offered through VPN services, they would access a variety of websites, including credit card transaction processors and dating websites.  Their role in the conspiracy also included originating the spoofed emails that will be explained later.

Martins, both Okorhis, Maxwell, Miah, Wumpini, Brady, Dean, Ojo, and others would open bank accounts for receiving fraudulently-obtained funds and sending them to other accounts controlled by their co-conspirators.  

Because they had control of email accounts at Crye-Leike, they could tell when fund transfers related to real estate sales were scheduled to take place.  They would then spoof the email addresses of those involved in the transactions and send instructions causing the financial transfers to be redirected to accounts controlled by members of the conspiracy.

The funds were then laundered in a variety of ways, including using the funds to purchase goods, including construction materials, cell phones, and other electronics, and having those goods shipped to Ghana for use or resale to benefit the members of the conspiracy.

Maxwell, Miah, and both Okorhis created false identities and created dating profiles with false emails to correspond to their false dating profiles.  Through these, they lured victims into online romance scams, gold-buying scams, and a variety of advanced fee fraud scams.  These romance scam victims would carry out acts on behalf of the conspiracy, including forwarding counterfeit checks, receiving and shipping merchandice, and transferring proceeds via wire, US Mail, ocean freight, and express package delivery services.

Martins, Maxwell, Miah, and both Okorhis also purchased stolen PII, including credit card information, banking information, and IP addresses from underground forums specializing in the sale of such information.

By purchasing cell phones in the United State and activating Voice-over-IP (VOIP) accounts, the US telephone numbers could then be used by the conspirators in Africa, allowing them to appear to be making their calls in the United States.

Some of the activity in this case dates back to 2012, when MIAH was already using fraudulently purchased credit cards and remote desktop protocol (RDP) to make online purchases that appeared to be in the United States.  (Hackers compromise US computers and set them up to use RDP so that foreign criminals can use them to originate credit card purchases in places where the credit card was issued.  By having, say, a Memphis Tennessee IP address, purchases made by a Memphis Tennessee credit card do not seem as suspicious.)

Specific Acts

Some of their crimes were extremely bold.  For example:

"On or about December 13, 2016, MIAH caused construction materials to be purchased with fraudulently obtained funds, and caused a freight container of construction supplies to be sent to him in Ghana."  WHAT?!?!  That's bold!

The compromise of the email accounts at Company A was in play by June 30, 2016, when $33,495 was wired to the wrong location after a tip received from stolen emails.

In August 2016, OJO opened a new Wells Fargo bank account, after his previous account at Bank of America was shut down due to fraud.  He used ABEGUNDE's new address (presumably in Atlanta, Georgia) as the address for the new account.

He also opened a Wells Fargo account in the same address in October of 2016.

Benard Okorhi sent emails as "Marc.Richards@aol.com" directing C.M. to obtain cash advances from credit cards and send the proceeds to recipients in Ghana.  He also ordered C.M. to purchase five iPhones and ship them to Ghana.

Miah used the "DrDenBrown@yahoo.com" email to tell Okorhi (as Marc.Richards) to smooth things out on the phone with a romance scam victim, because Okorhi had a better American accent.

Some of the other interesting "acts" in the conspiracy included:

25JUL2016 - Javier Luis Ramos Alonso accepts a $154,371 wire from Company A into his Wells Fargo account ending in 7688 and then sends the funds to accounts controlled by OJO in Atlanta.

26MAY2017 - Maxwell Peters sends a WhatsApp message directing an undercover Memphis FBI agent to receive a $15,000 check on his behalf.  Ooops!

30MAY2017 - Maxwell Peters directs the FBI agent to send $5,000 of the proceeds to himself in Ghana.

02JUN2017 - Maxwell Peters directs the FBI agent to send a $15,000 check to himself in Ghana.

Although the indictment doesn't lay out more of the particular acts, the Press Release says that this group stole more than $15 Million altogether!

Some interesting images

"M.Z." has an interesting Amazon Wish List for a romance scammer involved in shipping electronics:

On December 8, 2017, Abdulai says is asked in one of his WhatsApp chats:  "Hope Maxwell case didn't put you into any problem."  He responded "FBI came to my house asking me stuff about those transactions that was coming into my account so I'm tryna stay out f this whatapp n stuff for a while cuz I feel like they tracking me."

You got that right, Abdulai!