Category Archives: Android

The Free Mobile Anti-virus you are using can be a Fake!

Quick Heal Security Labs recently spotted multiple Fake Antivirus Apps on Google Play Store. What’s more alarming, is that one of these fake AV Apps has been downloaded 100000+ times already. These Apps appear to be genuine Anti-virus/virus-removal Apps with names like Virus Cleaner, Antivirus security, etc., but do not…

Smashing Security #144: Google helps the FBI, Twitter Jack’s hijack, and car data woes

Should Google really be helping the FBI with a bank robbery? What’s the story behind the Twitter CEO claiming there’s a bomb in their offices? And how much does your car really know about you?

And we mourn the loss of Doctor Who legend Terrance Dicks…

Uighurs in China were target of two-year iOS malware attack – reports

Android and Windows devices also targeted in campaign believed to be state-backed

Chinese Uighurs were the target of an iOS malware attack lasting more than two years that was revealed last week, according to multiple reports.

Android and Windows devices were also targeted in the campaign, which took the form of “watering hole attacks”: taking over commonly visited websites or redirecting their visitors to clones in order to indiscriminately attack each member of a community.

Related: China’s hi-tech war on its Muslim minority

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Expanding bug bounties on Google Play

Posted by Adam Bacchus, Sebastian Porst, and Patrick Mutchler — Android Security & Privacy

[Cross-posted from the Android Developers Blog]

We’re constantly looking for ways to further improve the security and privacy of our products, and the ecosystems they support. At Google, we understand the strength of open platforms and ecosystems, and that the best ideas don’t always come from within. It is for this reason that we offer a broad range of vulnerability reward programs, encouraging the community to help us improve security for everyone. Today, we’re expanding on those efforts with some big changes to Google Play Security Reward Program (GPSRP), as well as the launch of the new Developer Data Protection Reward Program (DDPRP).

Google Play Security Reward Program Scope Increases

We are increasing the scope of GPSRP to include all apps in Google Play with 100 million or more installs. These apps are now eligible for rewards, even if the app developers don’t have their own vulnerability disclosure or bug bounty program. In these scenarios, Google helps responsibly disclose identified vulnerabilities to the affected app developer. This opens the door for security researchers to help hundreds of organizations identify and fix vulnerabilities in their apps. If the developers already have their own programs, researchers can collect rewards directly from them on top of the rewards from Google. We encourage app developers to start their own vulnerability disclosure or bug bounty program to work directly with the security researcher community.

Vulnerability data from GPSRP helps Google create automated checks that scan all apps available in Google Play for similar vulnerabilities. Affected app developers are notified through the Play Console as part of the App Security Improvement (ASI) program, which provides information on the vulnerability and how to fix it. Over its lifetime, ASI has helped more than 300,000 developers fix more than 1,000,000 apps on Google Play. In 2018 alone, the program helped over 30,000 developers fix over 75,000 apps. The downstream effect means that those 75,000 vulnerable apps are not distributed to users until the issue is fixed.

To date, GPSRP has paid out over $265,000 in bounties. Recent scope and reward increases have resulted in $75,500 in rewards across July & August alone. With these changes, we anticipate even further engagement from the security research community to bolster the success of the program.

Introducing the Developer Data Protection Reward Program

Today, we are also launching the Developer Data Protection Reward Program. DDPRP is a bounty program, in collaboration with HackerOne, meant to identify and mitigate data abuse issues in Android apps, OAuth projects, and Chrome extensions. It recognizes the contributions of individuals who help report apps that are violating Google Play, Google API, or Google Chrome Web Store Extensions program policies.

The program aims to reward anyone who can provide verifiably and unambiguous evidence of data abuse, in a similar model as Google’s other vulnerability reward programs. In particular, the program aims to identify situations where user data is being used or sold unexpectedly, or repurposed in an illegitimate way without user consent. If data abuse is identified related to an app or Chrome extension, that app or extension will accordingly be removed from Google Play or Google Chrome Web Store. In the case of an app developer abusing access to Gmail restricted scopes, their API access will be removed. While no reward table or maximum reward is listed at this time, depending on impact, a single report could net as large as a $50,000 bounty.

As 2019 continues, we look forward to seeing what researchers find next. Thank you to the entire community for contributing to keeping our platforms and ecosystems safe. Happy bug hunting!

Cyber News Rundown: Android Adware

Reading Time: ~ 2 min.

Android Apps Riddled with Adware

Another 85 photo and gaming apps have been removed from the Google Play store after they were discovered to have been distributing adware to the roughly 8 million users who had downloaded the fake apps. The adware itself is rather tricky: by sitting dormant on devices for at least 30 minutes to avoid detection, they are then able to display a steady stream of full-screen ads that make users wait through each in its entirety before allowing continued use of the app.

Learn more about mobile security for shopping, banking and browsing.

Texas Hit by Multiple Ransomware Attacks

Several Texas municipalities have fallen victim to a single ransomware campaign affecting at least 22 locations and asking a cumulative ransom of $2.5 million. The state of Texas has been under fire for the past few months, suffering a seemingly endless string of ransomware attacks on local governments. Fortunately, many of the targeted districts have been swift to remediate issues and are already on the path to full system recovery, managing to avoid paying heavy ransoms.

Steam Zero-Days Released After Valve Bans Submitter

A researcher recently found several zero-day vulnerabilities within the Steam API that could allow for local privilege escalation (LPE), which could then allow malware to use the client as a launching point. Unfortunately, Valve decided the bug was outside of its scope of responsibility, locked the report, and refused to investigate it any further, also banning the submitter from the bug bounty program. Eventually, after much negative media coverage, Valve pushed out a patch that was quickly subverted by another workaround. It is unusual for a company with so many active users to blatantly ignore one of Microsoft’s most commonly patched vulnerabilities.

Adult Site Database Exposed

Yet another adult site has fallen victim to poor information security practices after a database containing personally identifiable information belonging to nearly 1 million users was misconfigured and left publicly available. The leak was discovered by researchers who were able to verify a breach and swiftly report it to the site, which took only four days to secure the data. Site users were notified of the breach and are being advised to change login credentials, especially those using work devices or contact details.

Magecart Found in Poker Tracker

The infamous Magecart card-skimming script was recently found loaded into Poker Tracker’s main site, which allows online poker players to make statistics-based betting decisions. It was later revealed that the site was fully injected via an outdated version of Drupal that has since been updated. The attack left the attackers with a copy of every payment made through the site or the app. 

The post Cyber News Rundown: Android Adware appeared first on Webroot Blog.

Alert! 27 apps found on Google Play Store that prompt you to install Fake Google Play Store

Quick Heal Security Lab spotted 27 malicious apps of dropper category on official “Google Play Store”. These apps have been removed from Play Store after Quick Heal Security Lab reported it to Google last week. These apps continuously show installation prompt for fake “Google Play Store”. If any user falls…

The Cerberus Banking Trojan: 3 Tips to Secure Your Financial Data

A new banking trojan has emerged and is going after users’ Android devices. Dubbed Cerberus, this remote access trojan allows a distant attacker to take over an infected Android device, giving the attacker the ability to conduct overlay attacks, gain SMS control, and harvest the victim’s contact list. What’s more, the author of the Cerberus malware has decided to rent out the banking trojan to other cybercriminals as a means to spread these attacks.

According to The Hacker News, the author claims that this malware was completely written from scratch and doesn’t reuse code from other existing banking trojans. Researchers who analyzed a sample of the Cerberus trojan found that it has a pretty common list of features including the ability to take screenshots, hijacking SMS messages, stealing contact lists, stealing account credentials, and more.

When an Android device becomes infected with the Cerberus trojan, the malware hides its icon from the application drawer. Then, it disguises itself as Flash Player Service to gain accessibility permission. If permission is granted, Cerberus will automatically register the compromised device to its command-and-control server, allowing the attacker to control the device remotely. To steal a victim’s credit card number or banking information, Cerberus launches remote screen overlay attacks. This type of attack displays an overlay on top of legitimate mobile banking apps and tricks users into entering their credentials onto a fake login screen. What’s more, Cerberus has already developed overlay attacks for a total of 30 unique targets and banking apps.

So, what can Android users do to secure their devices from the Cerberus banking trojan? Check out the following tips to help keep your financial data safe:

  • Be careful what you download.Cerberus malware relies on social engineering tactics to make its way onto a victim’s device. Therefore, think twice about what you download or even plug into your device.
  • Click with caution.Only click on links from trusted sources. If you receive an email or text message from an unknown sender asking you to click on a suspicious link, stay cautious and avoid interacting with the message altogether.
  • Use comprehensive security. Whether you’re using a mobile banking app on your phone or browsing the internet on your desktop, it’s important to safeguard all of your devices with an extra layer of security. Use robust security software like McAfee Total Protection so you can connect with confidence.

And, of course, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post The Cerberus Banking Trojan: 3 Tips to Secure Your Financial Data appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

How to Build Your 5G Preparedness Toolkit

5G has been nearly a decade in the making but has really dominated the mobile conversation in the last year or so. This isn’t surprising considering the potential benefits this new type of network will provide to organizations and users alike. However, just like with any new technological advancement, there are a lot of questions being asked and uncertainties being raised around accessibility, as well as cybersecurity. The introduction of this next-generation network could bring more avenues for potential cyberthreats, potentially increasing the likelihood of denial-of-service, or DDoS, attacks due to the sheer number of connected devices. However, as valid as these concerns may be, we may be getting a bit ahead of ourselves here. While 5G has gone from an idea to a reality in a short amount of time for a handful of cities, these advancements haven’t happened without a series of setbacks and speedbumps.

In April 2019, Verizon was the first to launch a next-generation network, with other cellular carriers following closely behind. While a technological milestone in and of itself, some 5G networks are only available in select cities, even limited to just specific parts of the city. Beyond the not-so widespread availability of 5G, internet speeds of the network have performed at a multitude of levels depending on the cellular carrier. Even if users are located in a 5G-enabled area, if they are without a 5G-enabled phone they will not be able to access all the benefits the network provides. These three factors – user location, network limitation of certain wireless carriers, and availability of 5G-enabled smartphones – must align for users to take full advantage of this exciting innovation.

While there is still a lot of uncertainty surrounding the future of 5G, as well as what cyberthreats may emerge as a result of its rollout, there are a few things users can do to prepare for the transition. To get your cybersecurity priorities in order, take a look at our 5G preparedness toolkit to ensure you’re prepared when the nationwide roll-out happens:

  • Follow the news. Since the announcement of a 5G enabled network, stories surrounding the network’s development and updates have been at the forefront of the technology conversation. Be sure to read up on all the latest to ensure you are well-informed to make decisions about whether 5G is something you want to be a part of now or in the future.
  • Do your research. With new 5G-enabled smartphones about to hit the market, ensure you pick the right one for you, as well as one that aligns with your cybersecurity priorities. The right decision for you might be to keep your 4G-enabled phone while the kinks and vulnerabilities of 5G get worked out. Just be sure that you are fully informed before making the switch and that all of your devices are protected.
  • Be sure to update your IoT devices factory settings. 5G will enable more and more IoT products to come online, and most of these connected products aren’t necessarily designed to be “security first.” A device may be vulnerable as soon as the box is opened, and many cybercriminals know how to get into vulnerable IoT devices via default settings. By changing the factory settings, you can instantly upgrade your device’s security and ensure your home network is secure.
  • Add an extra layer of security.As mentioned, with 5G creating more avenues for potential cyberthreats, it is a good idea to invest in comprehensive mobile security to apply to all of your devices to stay secure while on-the-go or at home.

Interested in learning more about IoT and mobile security trends and information? Follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and ‘Like” us on Facebook.

The post How to Build Your 5G Preparedness Toolkit appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Is Your WhatsApp Being Weird? You May Need to Check For Hidden Malware

With over 2.5 billion monthly active users that have accumulated since its fruition, Android has seen massive growth over the last 10 years. With so many users, it’s no wonder why cybercriminals continuously look to exploit Android devices. In fact, 25 million Android users have recently been hit with a new malware.

Dubbed Agent Smith, this cyberthreat sneaks onto a user’s device when the user downloads a malicious app from the app store, like a photo utility or game app. The app then silently installs the malware disguised as a legitimate Google updating tool. However, no updating icon appears on the screen, making the user oblivious to their device being in danger. Once installed, the malware replaces legitimate apps on the user’s phone, such as WhatsApp, with an evil update that serves bad ads. According to security researchers, the ads themselves aren’t malicious. But if a victim accidentally clicks on the ad, the hackers can make money from these ad fraud schemes. What’s more, there’s potential that these bad ads aren’t limited to just WhatsApp and could be found on other platforms as well.

So, what can Android users do to prevent this malware from sneaking onto their device? Check out the following tips to help stay secure:

  • Be wary of WhatsApp ads. Android users should take action if they experience advertisements displayed at strange times, such as when they open WhatsApp. The legitimate WhatsApp does not serve ads, so if you experience ads on this platform your device might have been infected.
  • Look out for suspicious apps. Check the apps and notifications section of your Android settings. If you see suspicious apps with names such as Google Updater, Google Installer for U, Google Powers, and Google Installer, uninstall these apps right away.
  • Stay away from unofficial Android stores. Google has extra precautions designed to prevent malware from getting onto the official Android store website, so only downloading apps from there could help protect you.
  • Use a security solution. A solution like McAfee Mobile Security can help Android users stay protected from threats like mobile malware. It also provides a free antivirus cleaner and phone security app to protect your online privacy and enhance device performance.

And, as always, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home  on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Is Your WhatsApp Being Weird? You May Need to Check For Hidden Malware appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

3 Tips for Protecting Against the New WhatsApp Bug

Messaging apps are a common form of digital communication these days, with Facebook’s WhatsApp being one of the most popular options out there. The communication platform boasts over 1.5 billion users – who now need to immediately update the app due to a new security threat. In fact, WhatsApp just announced a recently discovered security vulnerability that exposes both iOS and Android devices to malicious spyware.

So, how does this cyberthreat work, exactly? Leveraging the new WhatsApp bug, hackers first begin the scheme by calling an innocent user via the app. Regardless of whether the user picks up or not, the attacker can use that phone call to infect the device with malicious spyware. From there, crooks can potentially snoop around the user’s device, likely without the victim’s knowledge.

Fortunately, WhatsApp has already issued a patch that solves for the problem – which means users will fix the bug if they update their app immediately. But that doesn’t mean users shouldn’t still keep security top of mind now and in the future when it comes to messaging apps and the crucial data they contain. With that said, here are a few security steps to follow:

  • Flip on automatic updates. No matter the type of application or platform, it’s always crucial to keep your software up-to-date, as fixes for vulnerabilities are usually included in each new version. Turning on automatic updates will ensure that you are always equipped with the latest security patches.
  • Be selective about what information you share. When chatting with fellow users on WhatsApp and other messaging platforms, it’s important you’re always careful of sharing personal data. Never exchange financial information or crucial personal details over the app, as they can possibly be stolen in the chance your device does become compromised with spyware or other malware.
  • Protect your mobile phones from spyware. To help prevent your device from becoming compromised by malicious software, such as this WhatsApp spyware, be sure to add an extra layer of security to it by leveraging a mobile security solution. With McAfee Mobile Security being available for both iOS and Android, devices of all types will remain protected from cyberthreats.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post 3 Tips for Protecting Against the New WhatsApp Bug appeared first on McAfee Blogs.