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Smashing Security #124: Poisoned porn ads, the A word, and why why why Wipro?

Smashing Security #124: Poisoned porn ads, the A word, and why why why Wipro?

The hacker who lived the high life after spreading malware via porn sites, Wipro demonstrates how to turn a cybersecurity crisis into a PR disaster, and why are humans listening in to your Alexa conversations?

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by special guest Brian Honan.

Cyber Security Roundup for December 2018

The final Cyber Security Roundup of 2018 concludes reports of major data breaches, serious software vulnerabilities and evolving cyber threats, so pretty much like the previous 11 months of the year.

5.3 millions users of "make your own avatar" app Boomoji had their accounts compromised, after the company reportedly didn't secure their internet connected databases properly. "Question and Answer" website Quora also announced the compromise of 100 million of its user accounts following a hack.


A large data breach reported in Brazil is of interest, a massive 120 million Brazilian citizens personal records were compromised due to a poorly secured Amazon S3 bucket. This is not the first mass data breach caused by an insecure S3 bucket we've seen in 2018, the lesson to be learnt in the UK, is to never assume or take cloud security for granted, its essential practice to test and audit cloud services regularly.

Amongst the amazing and intriguing space exploration successes reported by NASA in December, the space agency announced its employee's personal data may had been compromised. Lets hope poor security doesn't jeopardise the great and highly expensive work NASA are undertaking.  
NASA InSight Lander arrives on Mars 

It wouldn't be normal for Facebook not to be in the headlines for poor privacy, this time Facebook announced a Photo API bug which exposed 6.8 million user images

Away from the political circus that is Brexit, the European Parliament put into a law a new Cybersecurity Act. Because of the Brexit making all the headlines, this new law may have gone under the radar, but it certainly worth keeping an eye on, even after UK leaves the EU. The EU Parliament has agreed to increase the budget for the ENISA (Network & InfoSec) agency, which will be rebranded as the "EU Agency for Cybersecurity". The Cybersecurity Act will establish an EU wide framework for cyber-security certifications for online services and customer devices to be used within the European Economic Area, and will include IoT devices and critical infrastructure technology. Knowing the EU's love of regulations, I suspect these new best practice framework and associated accreditations to be turned into regulations further down the line, which would impact any tech business operating in European Union.

The UK Parliament enacted the "The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act", which also went under the radar due to all the Brexit political noise. The act requires the appointment of a data guardian within England and Wales. The data guardian will publish guidance on the processing of health and adult social care data for use by public bodies providing health or social care services, and produce an annual report.

Chinese telecoms giant Huawei had plenty of negative media coverage throughout December, with UK government pressuring BT into not using Huawei kit within BT's new 5G network, due to a perceived threat to UK's future critical national infrastructure posed by the Chinese stated-backed tech giant.  The UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said he had "very deep concerns" about Huawei being involved in new UK mobile network.
Security company Insinia cause controversy after it took over the Twitter accounts by Eamon Holmes, Louis Theroux and several others celebs. Insinia said it had managed the account takeover by analysing the way Twitter handles messages posted by phone, to inject messages onto the targeted accounts by analysing the way the social network interacted with smartphones when messages are sent. However, Insinia were accused of being unethical and breaking the UK Computer Misuse Act in some quarters.

Unsecured internet connected printers are being hacked again, this time they were used to sent print out messages of support for Swedish YouTube star PewDiePie. A hacker named TheHackerGiraffe was said to have targeted up 50,000 printers after using Shodan to search for open printer ports online, the scan was said to have found 800,000 vulnerable printers.

An Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) report warned UK banks about their over-reliance on third-party security providers. The FCA said companies "generally lacked board members with strong familiarity or specific technical cyber-expertise. External expertise may be helpful but may also, if overly relied on, undermine the effectiveness of the ‘three lines of defence’ model in identifying and managing cyber-risks in a timely way. The report also warned about supply-chain security, especially the role that firms play in other organisations’ supply chains.

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AWARENESS, EDUCATION AND THREAT INTELLIGENCE
REPORTS

Cyber Security Roundup for November 2018

One of the largest data breaches in history was announced by Marriott Hotels at the end of November. A hack was said to have compromised up to a mind-blowing "half a Billion" hotel guests' personal information over a four year period.  See my post, Marriott Hotels 4 Year Hack Impacts Half a Billion Guests for the full details. The Radisson Hotel Group also disclosed its Rewards programme suffer a data compromise. Radisson said hackers had gained access to a database holding member's name, address, email address, and in some cases, company name, phone number, and Radisson Rewards member number.

Vision Direct reported a website compromise, which impacted users of their website between 3rd and 8th November, some 16,300 people were said to be at risk  A fake Google Analytics script was placed within its website code by hackers. 

Eurostar customers were notified by email to reset their passwords following presumably successful automated login attempts to Eurostar accounts with stolen credentials obtained by an unknown method.

Two of the TalkTalk hackers were sentenced to a grand total of 20 months for their involvement in the infamous 2015 blackmail hack, which was said to have cost TalkTalk £77 million. There may have been up to 10 other attackers involved according to the court transcripts when hackers attempted to blackmail TalkTalk’s then CEO Dido Harding into paying a ransom in Bitcoin to cover up the breach. Has the enterprise, and judiciary, learned anything from TalkTalk hack?

Uber was fined £385,000 by the UK Information Commissioner's Office, after hackers stole 2.7 million UK customers in October and November 2016. Uber attempted to cover up the breach by paying the hackers $100,000 (£78,400) to destroy the stolen customer data. Meanwhile stateside,
 Uber paid $148m to settle federal charges. 

HSBC announced it had suffered a customer data breach in between 4th and 14th of October 2018 in a suspected "credential stuffing" attack. HSBC didn't state how many customers were impacted but are known to have 38 million customers worldwide. HSBC advised their customers to regularly change and use strong passwords and to monitor their accounts for unauthorised activity, sage good practice online banking advice, but I am sure their customers will want to know what has happened.

Facebook is still making the wrong kind of privacy headlines, this time it was reported that Facebook member's private message data was found for sale online, with one instance involving 257,256 stolen profiles and including 81,208 private messages. The report appears to suggest malicious browser extensions, not Facebook, may be behind the data breach.

A report from a UK parliamentary committee warned the UK government is failing to deliver on protecting the UK's critical national infrastructure (CNI) from cyber attacks. "The threat to critical infrastructure, including the power grid, is growing" the committee reported, with some states -"especially Russia" - starting to explore ways of disrupting CNI. An advisory notice also warned that UK companies connected to CNI were being targeted by cyber attackers believed to be in eastern Europe. APT28 (Russian based FancyBear) has added the "Cannon" Downloader Tool to their arsenal, according to researchers.

Amazon's showcase Black Friday sale was hit by data breach days before it started. The online retail giant said it emailed affected customers, but refused to provide any details on the extent or nature of the breach. The customer email said “Our website inadvertently disclosed your email address or name and email address due to a technical error. The issue has been fixed. This is not a result of anything you have done, and there is no need for you to change your password or take any other action.” 

There was a far more positive security announcement by Amazon about their AWS (cloud) services, with the launch of three new services to simplify and automate AWS security configuration called AWS Control Tower, AWS Security Hub, and AWS Lake Formation McAfee released their 2019 'Cloud Adoption and Risk Report' which highlights the vital importance of configuring cloud services correctly and securely.

RiskIQ claimed that monitoring for malicious code could have stopped the recent theft of 185,000 British Airways customer records. The Magecart hacker group is believed to be responsible for injecting twenty-two lines of malicious script into the British Airway's payment page, which successfully lifted debit and credit card details, including the CVV code.

Finally, according to enSilo, European Windows users are said to be targeted by a sophisticated malware called 'DarkGate', which has an arrange of nefarious capabilities, including cryptomining, credential stealing, ransomware, and remote-access takeovers. The DarkGate malware has been found to be distributed via Torrent files disguised as popular entertainment offerings, which includes Campeones and The Walking Dead, so be careful to avoid becoming infected!

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