Category Archives: adobe

Adobe announces Creative Cloud updates, and an iPad version of Illustrator

At its annual MAX conference, which is taking place online this week, Adobe introduced new features for Creative Cloud, with updates available for Fresco, Illustrator, Photoshop, XD and Lightroom.

The post Adobe announces Creative Cloud updates, and an iPad version of Illustrator first appeared on IT World Canada.

Adobe releases a new set of out-of-band patches for its products

Adobe has released a second out-of-band security update to address critical vulnerabilities affecting several products. 

Adobe has released a second out-of-band security update to fix critical vulnerabilities that impact numerous products of the IT giant. 

The flaws impact Adobe Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Marketo, Animate, After Effects, Photoshop, Premiere Pro, Media Encoder, InDesign, and the Creative Cloud desktop application on Windows and macOS machines. 

Adobe has released seven critical vulnerabilities in Illustrator, including memory corruption and out of bounds read/write issues that can lead to arbitrary code execution. 

Below the vulnerability details:

Vulnerability CategoryVulnerability ImpactSeverityCVE Numbers
Out-of-Bounds Read


Arbitrary code execution  CriticalCVE-2020-24409
CVE-2020-24410
Out-of-Bounds WriteArbitrary code execution 


Critical


CVE-2020-24411
Memory Corruption    Arbitrary Code Execution    Critical CVE-2020-24412
CVE-2020-24413
CVE-2020-24414
CVE-2020-24415

Adobe has addressed an “important” uncontrolled search path element security flaw in Dreamweaver which could be exploited by attackers to escalate privilege.

Vulnerability CategoryVulnerability ImpactSeverityCVE Numbers
Uncontrolled Search Path Element
Privilege Escalation ImportantCVE-2020-24425

The company fixed four critical vulnerabilities in Animate, they are out-of-bounds read, stack overflow, and double-free flaws that can result in arbitrary code execution.  

Vulnerability CategoryVulnerability ImpactSeverityCVE Numbers
Double-freeArbitrary code executionCriticalCVE-2020-9747
Stack-based buffer overflowArbitrary code executionCriticalCVE-2020-9748
Out-of-bounds readArbitrary code executionCriticalCVE-2020-9749
CVE-2020-9750

Adobe addressed an “important” XSS issue impacting the Marketo Sales Insight Salesforce package that could have been weaponized to deploy malicious JavaScript in a browser session. 

 Vulnerability Category Vulnerability ImpactSeverityCVE numbers
Cross-site Scripting (stored) JavaScript execution in the browserImportantCVE-2020-24416

The company addressed

Vulnerability details

Vulnerability CategoryVulnerability ImpactSeverityCVE Numbers
Out-of-Bounds Read Arbitrary Code Execution     Critical  CVE-2020-24418
Uncontrolled search pathArbitrary Code Execution       CriticalCVE-2020-24419

Adobe addressed a single out-of-bounds read and an uncontrolled search path critial flaws in After Effects that could lead to the execution of malicious code are now patched. 

Vulnerability CategoryVulnerability ImpactSeverityCVE Numbers
Out-of-Bounds Read Arbitrary Code Execution     Critical  CVE-2020-24418
Uncontrolled search pathArbitrary Code Execution       CriticalCVE-2020-24419

Adobe has fixed a critical memory corruption flaw in InDesign that could also be exploited to execute arbitrary code. 

Vulnerability CategoryVulnerability ImpactSeverityCVE Number
Memory Corruption Arbitrary Code ExecutionCriticalCVE-2020-24421

The company also fixed other critical uncontrolled search path issues in PhotoshopPremiere ProMedia Encoder, and Creative Cloud installer for desktop.

Last week, Adobe released a separate set of out-of-band security patches affecting the Magento platform.

Pierluigi Paganini

(SecurityAffairs – hacking, code execution)

The post Adobe releases a new set of out-of-band patches for its products appeared first on Security Affairs.

Cyber Security Roundup for October 2020

A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, October 2020.

COVID-19 wasn't the only virus seriously disrupting the start of the new UK academic year, with ransomware plaguing a number of University and Colleges in September.  Newcastle University was reportedly hit by the 'DoppelPaymer' crime group, a group known for deploying malware to attack their victims, and behind leaking online documents from Elon Musk's SpaceX and Tesla companies. The northeast university reported a personal data breach to the UK Information Commissioner's Office after its stolen files were posted online, along with a Twitter threat to release further confidential student and staff data if a ransom payment was not paid. In a statement, the university said "it will take several weeks" to address the issues, and that many IT services will not be operating during this period", that statement is the hallmark of recovery from a mass ransomware infection.

Doppelpaymer Ransom notice

On the back of the Newcastle University cyberattack, the UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) issued a warning to all British universities and colleges about a spike in ransomware attacks targeting the British educational sector. NCSC's director of operations Paul Chichester said the agency had seen an increase in the "utterly reprehensible" attacks over the past 18 months and was concerned they would disrupt young people's education.  The NCSC's guidance for organisations on defending against ransomware attacks is available here.

Across the pond, healthcare giant Universal Heather Services (UHS), which operates nearly 400 hospitals and clinics, was said to be severely disrupted by the Ryuk ransomware. According to Bleeping Computer, a UHS employee said encrypted files had the telltale .ryk extension, while another employee described a ransom note fitted the Ryuk ransomware demand note. A Reddit thread claimed “All UHS hospitals nationwide in the US currently have no access to phones, computer systems, internet, or the data center. Ambulances are being rerouted to other hospitals, the information needed to treat patients – health records, lab works, cardiology reports, medications records, etc. – is either temporarily unavailable or received with delay, affecting patient treatment. Four people died tonight alone due to the waiting on results from the lab to see what was going on”. In response, UHS released a statement which said, “We implement extensive IT security protocols and are working diligently with our IT security partners to restore IT operations as quickly as possible. In the meantime, our facilities are using their established back-up processes including offline documentation methods".

'Dark Overlord', the handle of a British hacker involved in the theft of information as part of "The Overlord" hacking group was jailed for five years in the United States and ordered to pay $1.5 million in restitution, after pleading guilty to conspiring to commit aggravated identity theft and computer fraud, in other words, orchestrating cyber exportation attacks against US firms.


ZeroLogon:  IT Support Staff must Patch Now!
A critical Microsoft Windows Server Domain Controller vulnerability (CVE-2020-1472) is now causing concern for IT staff, after the Microsoft, CISA, the UK NCSC, and other security bodies warned the vulnerability was being actively exploited in mid-September. Dubbed 'Zerologon', Microsoft issued a security fix for the bug, which scored a maximum criticality rate of 10.0, as part of their August 2020 'Patch Tuesday' release of monthly security updates. Since that public disclosure of the flaw, there have been multiple proofs-of-concept (PoC) exploits appearing on the internet, which threat actors are now adapting into their cyberattacks. There are no mitigation or workarounds for this vulnerability, so it is essential for the CVE-2020-1472 security update is installed on all Microsoft Windows Domain Controllers, and then ensure DC enforcement mode is enabled. 

Stay safe and secure.

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        Cyber Security Roundup for September 2020

        A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, August 2020.

        Taking security training courses and passing certification exams are common ingredients in the makeup of the vast majority of accomplished cybersecurity and information security professionals. As such, two security incidents last month raised more than just a surprising eyebrow or two within the UK security industry. 

        The first involved the renown and well respected United States security training company, The SANS Institue, announcing that a successful email phishing attack against one of its employees resulted in 28,000 personal records being stolenSANS classified this compromise as "consent phishing", namely where an employee is tricked into providing malicious Microsoft Office 365 OAuth applications access to their O365 accounts. In June 2020, Microsoft warned 'consent phishing' scams were targeting remote workers and their cloud services.

        The second incident involved British cybersecurity firm NCC Group, after The Register reported NCC marked CREST penetration testing certification exam 'cheat cheats' were posted on Github. El Reg stated the leaked NCC marked document "offered step-by-step guides and walkthroughs of information about the Crest exams.  With those who posted the documents claiming that the documents contained a clone of the Crest CRT exam app that helped users to pass the CRT exam in the first attempt. CREST, a globally recognised provider of penetration testing accreditations, conducted their own investigation into the Github post and then suspended their Certified Infrastructure Tester (CCF Inf) and Certified Web Application Tester (CCT App) exams.

        Reuters reported British trade minister Liam Fox email account was compromised by Russian hackers through a spear-phishing attack. This led to leaks of sensitive US-UK  trade documents in a disinformation campaign designed to influence the outcome of the UK general election in late 2019.

        UK foreign exchange firm Travelex is still revelling from the double 2020 whammy of major ransomware outbreak followed by the impact COVID-19, and has managed to stay in business thanks a bailout arranged by their business administrators PWC. 

        Uber's former Cheif Security Officer has been charged with obstruction of justice in the United States, accused of covering up a massive 57 million record data breach in 2016. Uber eventually admitted paying a hacking group $100,000 (£75,000) ransom to delete the data they had stolen.

        The British Dental Association advised its dentist members that their bank account details and correspondence with them were stolen by hackers.  A BDA spokeswoman told BBC News it was possible that information about patients was also exposed, but remained vague about the potential context. The cyber breach was likely caused by a hack of the BDA website given it was taken offline for a considerable amount of time after reporting the breach.

        Its seems that every month I report a huge cloud misconfiguration data beach, typically found by researchers looking for publicity, and caused by businesses not adequately securing their cloud services.  This month it was the turn of cosmetics giant Avon after researchers 'SafetyDetectives" found 19 million records were accessible online due to the misconfiguration of a cloud server.  Accurics separately reported misconfigured cloud services accounted for 93% of 200 breaches it has seen in the past two years, exposing more than 30 billion records. Also predicting cloud services data breaches are likely to increase in both velocity and scale, I am inclined to agree.
        Crime Dot Com: From Viruses to Vote Rigging, How Hacking Went Global
        Finally, I was invited to review a pre-release of Geoff White’s new book, Crime Dot Com: From Viruses to Vote Rigging, How Hacking Went Global”. I posted a book review upon its release in August, I thoroughly recommend it. The book is superbly researched and written, the author’s storytelling investigative journalist style not only lifts the lid on the murky underground world of cybercrime but shines a light on the ingenuity, persistence and ever-increasing global scale of sophisticated cybercriminal enterprises. While this book is an easily digestible read for non-cyber security experts, the book provides cybersecurity professionals working on the frontline in defending organisations and citizens against cyber-attacks, with valuable insights and lessons to be learnt about their cyber adversaries and their techniques, particularly in understanding the motivations behind today's common cyberattacks.

        Stay safe and secure.

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        Cyber Security Roundup for August 2020

        A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, July 2020.

        The standout hack of July 2020, and possibly of the year, was the takeover of 45 celebrity Twitter accounts, in a bid to scam their millions of followers by requesting Bitcoin in tweets. 
        Twitter confirms internal tools used in bitcoin-promoting attack ...
        Scam Tweet
        The high-profile Twitter accounts compromised included Barack Obama, Elon Musk, Kanye West, Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Kim Kardashian, and Joe Biden. Around £80,000 of Bitcoin was sent to the scammer's Bitcoin account before Twitter swiftly took action by deleting the scam tweets and blocking every 'blue tick' verified Twitter user from tweeting, including me

        While the Twitter hack and scam dominated media headlines around the world, the attack was not the 'highly sophisticated cyber-attack' as reported by many media outlets, but it was certainly bold and clever. The attackers phoned Twitter administrative staff and blagged (socially engineered) their Twitter privilege account credentials out of them, which in turn gave the attackers access to Twitter's backend administrative system and to any Twitter account they desired. It is understood this Twitter account access was sold by a hacker on the dark web to a scammer in the days before the attack, that scammer(s) orchestrated a near-simultaneous Bitcoin scam tweets to be posted from the high profile accounts. On 31st July, law enforcement authorities charged three men for the attack, with one of the suspects disclosed as a 19-year British man from Bognor Regis.

        There was a very serious critical Windows vulnerability disclosed as part the July 2020 Microsoft 'Patch Tuesday' security update release. Dubbed "SIGRed", it is a 17-year-old Remote Code Execution (RCE) vulnerability in Windows Domain Name System (DNS), a component commonly present in Microsoft Windows Server 2008, 2012, 2012R2, 2016 and 2019. Disclosed as CVE-2020-1350 it was given the highest possible CVSS score of 10.0, which basically means the vulnerability is “easy to attack” and “likely to be exploited”, although Microsoft said they hadn't seen any evidence of its exploitation at the time of their patch release.

        Given SIGRed is a wormable vulnerability, it makes it particularly dangerous, as wormable malware could exploit the vulnerability to rapidly spread itself over flat networks without any user interaction, as per the WannaCry attack on the NHS and other large organisations. Secondly, it could be used to exploit privilege level accounts (i.e. admin accounts found on Servers).  The Microsoft CVE-2020-1350 vulnerability can be mitigated on effected systems by either applying the Microsoft Windows DNS Server Microsoft released patch (https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-US/security-guidance/advisory/CVE-2020-1350 or by applying a Registry Workaround (https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4569509/windows-dns-server-remote-code-execution-vulnerability)

        At least 10 universities in the UK had student data stolen after hackers attacked Blackbaud, an education-focused cloud service provider. UK universities impacted included York, Loughborough, Leeds, London, Reading, Exeter and Oxford. According to the BBC News website, Blackbaud said "In May of 2020, we discovered and stopped a ransomware attack. Prior to our locking the cyber-criminal out, the cyber-criminal removed a copy of a subset of data from our self-hosted environment."

        As expected, the UK Government ordered UK mobile network operators to remove all Huawei 5G equipment by 2027, and banning their purchase of Huawei 5G network equipment after 31st December 2020.  Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden said it follows sanctions imposed by the United States, which claims the Chinese firm poses a national security threat, which Huawei continues to resolutely deny. The ban is expected to delay the UK's 5G rollout by a year. "This has not been an easy decision, but it is the right one for the UK telecoms networks, for our national security and our economy, both now and indeed in the long run," he said. 
        In some media quarters, it was suggested the UK u-turn on Huawei could lead to cyberattack repercussions after Reuter's said its sources confirmed China was behind cyberattacks on Australia's critical national infrastructure and government institutions following their trade dispute with China.

        Russian Hacking Group (APT 29) was jointly accused of targeting the theft of coronavirus vaccine research by the UK NCSC, the Canadian Communication Security Establishment (CSE), United States Department for Homeland Security (DHS), Cyber-security Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the US National Security Agency (NSA). The UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) said the hackers "almost certainly" operated as "part of Russian intelligence services". It did not specify which research organisations had been targeted, or whether any coronavirus vaccine research data was taken, but it did say vaccine research was not hindered by the hackers. Russia's ambassador to the UK has rejected allegations, "I don't believe in this story at all, there is no sense in it," Andrei Kelin told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show. While Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said it is "very clear Russia did this", adding that it is important to call out this "pariah-type behaviour". 

        UK sport said hackers tried to steal a £1 million club transfer fee and froze turnstiles at a football game. Cybercriminals hacked a Premier League club managing director's email account during a player transfer negotiation, the million-pound theft was only thwarted by a last-minute intervention by a bank.  Another English football club was targeted by a ransomware attack which stopped its turnstiles and CCTV systems from working, which nearly resulted in a football match being postponed. Common tactics used by hackers to attack football clubs include compromising emails, cyber-enabled fraud and ransomware to shutting down digital systems. For further information on this subject, see my extensive blog post on football club hacking, The Billion Pound Manchester City Hack.

        Smartwatch maker Garmin, had their website, mobile app and customer service call centres taken down by ransomware on 23rd July 2020. Reports suggest the fitness brand had been hit by the WastedLocker ransomware strain, which is said to have been developed by individuals linked to a Russia-based hacking group called 'Evil Corp'.  According to Bleeping Computer, Garmin paid $10 million to cybercriminals to receive decryption keys for the malware on 24th or 25th July 2020.

        Yet another big data exposure caused by a misconfigured AWS S3 bucket was found by security researchers, one million files of Fitness Brand 'V Shred' was discovered exposed to the world, including the personal data of 99,000 V Shred customers. Interestingly V Shred defended the researcher findings by claiming it was necessary for user files to be publicly available and denied that any PII data had been exposed.

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        Cyber Security Roundup for July 2020

        A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, June 2020.

        Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a sophisticated nation-state actor is causing increasing havoc by attacking the country’s government, corporate institutions, and his country's critical infrastructure operators. He said, “We know it is a sophisticated state-based cyber actor because of the scale and nature of the targeting and the tradecraft used". While Morrison didn't actually name the specific country responsible in his statement, Reuters said its sources confirmed China was the culprit.  Political t
        ensions have ramped up between Australia and China in recent months after Australia called for an investigation into China’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. China then reacted by placing tariffs on Australian exports and banning shipments of beef from Australia.

        Why am I leading a UK cybersecurity blog with an Australian cyberattacks story? Well, it is because the UK might well be next in the cross-hairs of China's sophisticated cyber army, after the UK Governance stance on using Huawei in 5G infrastructure significantly soured last month. And also due to the increasing political pressure applied by the UK government on the Chinese government following their introduction of a controversial new security law in Hong Kong.

        Increased UK Huawei Tensions in June 2020
        While the Australian PM righty suggested their nation-state threat actor was sophisticated, the cyberattacks they described aren't so sophisticated. Their attackers engaged in spear-phishing campaigns designed to trick email recipients into clicking a link leading to a malicious files or credential harvesting page, opening malicious attachments or granting Office 365 OAuth tokens to the actors.  This is the same MO of cyber attacks orchestrated by the cybercriminals fraternity on a daily basis. The Australian government statement advises organisations to patch their internet-facing devices, including web and email servers and to use multifactor authentication. All good advise, in fact, all essential good practice for all organisations to adopt no matter their threat actor landscape.

        Away from the international cyber warfare scene, a coalition led by security companies is urging the UK government to revamp the much-dated Computer Misuse Act. The UK's 'anti-hacking' law is 30 years old, so written well before the internet took root in our digital society, so is not really suitable for prosecuting for modern cybercriminals, they tend to be prosecuted under financial crime and fraud laws. The coalition is calling for a change in the law includes the NCC Group, F-Secure, techUK, McAfee and Trend Micro. They argue section 1 of the Act prohibits the unauthorised access to any programme or data held in any computer and has not kept pace with advances in technology. In their letter to PM they said "With the advent of modern threat intelligence research, defensive cyber activities often involve the scanning and interrogation of compromised victims and criminals systems to lessen the impact of attacks and prevent future incidents. In these cases, criminals are obviously very unlikely to explicitly authorise such access."

        Since launching a 'Suspicious Email Reporting Service' in April 2020, the UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) announced it has now received one million reports, receiving around 16,500 emails a day. NCSC Chief Executive Officer Ciaran Martin called the number of reports a “milestone” and “a testament to the vigilance of the British public". I think the email reporting service is another fantastic free service provided by NCSC (i.e. UK Gov) to UK citizens, so one thing the UK government is definitely getting right in the cybersecurity space at the moment.

        Zoom announced it will extend 'optional' end-to-end encryption (E2EE) to free users. It is not certain when exactly Zoom's free E2EE will commence or whether it will be defaulted as on, given the Zoom CEO said, “We plan to begin early beta of the E2EE feature in July 2020.” Still good to see the much security criticised Zoom is continuing to bolstering its security, and also by appointing a seasoned Chief Information Security Officer from Salesforce.

        Some men just want to watch the world burn...
        With the recent uptick in ransomware, phishing, unsecured cloud buckets and massive data breaches dominating the media headlines over the past couple of years, you could be forgiven for forgetting about the threat posed by Distributed-Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks. So then, a timely reminder that some threat actors have vast botnets as their disposal for orchestrating huge DDoS attacks after Amazon reported thwarting the biggest ever DDoS attack, and a European bank suffered the biggest ever PPS DDoS attack. The motives of these colossal DDoS attacks are unclear, I guess some men just want to watch the world burn.
        Quote from Batman butler Alfred (Michael Caine), The Dark Knight
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          Cyber Security Roundup for June 2020

          A roundup of UK focused Cyber and Information Security News, Blog Posts, Reports and general Threat Intelligence from the previous calendar month, May 2020.

          EasyJet's disclosure of a "highly sophisticated cyber-attack", which occurred in January 2020, impacting 9 million of their customers was the biggest cybersecurity story of May 2020 in the UK. Although no details about this 'cyber-attack' were disclosed, other than 2,208 customers had their credit card details accessed.  


          Using terms like "highly sophisticated" without providing any actual details of the cyberattack makes one think back to when TalkTalk CEO Dido Harding described a cyber-attack as "significant and sustained cyber-attack" in 2015. In TalkTalk's case, that cyber attack turned out to be a bunch of teenage kids taking advantage of a then 10-year-old SQL injection vulnerability.  City A.M. described Dido's responses as "naive", noting when asked if the affected customer data was encrypted or not, she replied: "The awful truth is that I don’t know". Today Dido is responsible for the UK governments Track, Test and Trace application, which no doubt will ring privacy alarms bells with some. 

          Back to the EasyJet breach, all we know is the ICO and the NCSC are supporting UK budget airline, EasyJet said "We take issues of security extremely seriously and continue to invest to further enhance our security environment. There is no evidence that any personal information of any nature has been misused, however, on the recommendation of the ICO, we are communicating with the approximately nine million customers whose travel details were accessed to advise them of protective steps to minimise any risk of potential phishing. We are advising customers to be cautious of any communications purporting to come from EasyJet or EasyJet Holidays." 

          It will be interesting to see the DPA enforcement line Information Commission's Office (ICO) adopts with EasyJet, especially considering the current COVID-19 impact on the UK aviation industry.  Some security commentators have called ICO a "Toothless Tiger" in regards to their supportive response, an ICO label I've not heard since long before the GDPR came into force. But the GDPR still has a sting its tail beyond ICO enforcement action in the UK, in that individuals impacted by personal data breaches can undertake a class-action lawsuit. So then, it can be no real surprise to law firm PGMBM announce it has issued a class-action claim in the High Court of London, with a potential liability of an eye-watering £18 billion!. If successful, each customer impacted by the breach could receive a payout of £2,000.

          The 2020 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) was released, the most valuable annual report in the cybersecurity industry in my humble opinion. The 2020 DBIR used data compiled before COVID-19 pandemic.  The report analyses 32,002 security incidents and 3,950 confirmed breaches from 81 global contributors from 81 countries.
          • 86% of data breaches for financial gain - up from 71% in 2019 
          • 43% web application (cloud-based) - these attacks have doubled, reflecting the growth in the use of cloud-based services.
          • 67% of data breaches resulted from credential theft, human error or social attacks. 
          • Clearly identified cyber-breach pathways enable a “Defender Advantage” in the fight against cyber-crime 
          • On-going patching successful - fewer than 1 in 20 breaches exploit vulnerabilities
          The vast majority of breaches continue to be caused by external actors.
          • 70% with organised crime accounting for 55% of these. 
          • Credential theft and social attacks such as phishing and business email compromises cause the majority of breaches (over 67%), specifically:
            • 37% of credential theft breaches used stolen or weak credentials,
            • 25% involved phishing
            • Human error accounted for 22%
          The 2020 DBIR highlighted a two-fold increase in web application breaches, to 43%, and stolen credentials were used in over 80% of these cases. Ransomware had a slight increase, found in 27% of malware incidents compared to 24% in the 2019 DBIR with 18% of organisations reported blocking at least one piece of ransomware last year.

          REvil (aka Sodinokibi) hackers are said to have stolen celebrity data from a law firm 'Grubman Shire Meiselas & Sacks'. With 756 gigabytes of personal data, emails, and contract details were taken, including Lady Gaga, Madonna, Elton John, Barbara Streisand, Bruce Springsteen and Mariah Carey to name a few. 

          Pitney Bowes was hit with ransomware for the second time in 7 monthsPitney Bowes said attackers breached company systems and accessed “a limited set of corporate file shares” that “contained information used by our business teams and functional groups to conduct business-related activities.” News reports state the Maze ransomware group is behind the attack, threatening to post confidential if Pitney Bowes does not pay up.

          Amazon's UK website was defaced with racist abuse,  which appeared on multiple listings on its UK website. Amazon has not disclosed how long the racist language remained on the site, but it sparked outrage on Twitter, Amazon said: "We investigated, removed the images in question and took action against the bad actor".

          LogMeOnce, a password identity management suite provider, has published a detailed interview with myself titled 'Passwords are and have always been an Achilles Heel in CyberSecurity'. In the Q&A I talk about Passwords Security (obviously), Threat Actors, IoT Security, Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA), Anti-Virus, Biometrics, AI, Privacy, and a bit on how I got into a career in Cybersecurity.

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