Author Archives: Gary Davis

Millions of Car Buyer Records Exposed: How to Bring This Breach to a Halt

Buying a car can be quite a process and requires a lot of time, energy, and research. What most potential car buyers don’t expect is to have their data exposed for all to see. But according to Threatpost, this story rings true for many prospective buyers. Over 198 million records containing personal, loan, and financial information on prospective car buyers were recently leaked due to a database that was left without password protection.

The database belonged to Dealer Leads, a company that gathers information on prospective buyers through a network of targeted websites. These targeted websites provide car-buying research information and classified ads for visitors, allowing Dealer Leads to collect this information and send it to franchise and independent car dealerships to be used as sales leads. The information collected included records with names, email addresses, phone numbers, physical addresses, IP addresses, and other sensitive or personally identifiable information – 413GB worth of this data, to be exact. What’s more, the exposed database contained ports, pathways, and storage info that cybercriminals could exploit to access Dealer Lead’s deeper digital network.

Although the database has been closed off to the public, it is unclear how long it was left exposed. And while it’s crucial for organizations to hold data privacy to the utmost importance, there are plenty of things users can do to help safeguard their data. Check out the following tips to help you stay secure:

  • Be vigilant about checking your accounts. If you suspect that your data has been compromised, frequently check your accounts for unusual activity. This will help you stop fraudulent activity in its tracks.
  • Place a fraud alert. If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.
  • Consider using identity theft protection. A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Iron Man’s Instagram Hacked: Snap Away Cybercriminals With These Social Media Tips

Celebrities: they’re just like us! Well, at least in the sense that they still face common cyberthreats. This week, “Avengers: Endgame” actor Robert Downey Jr. was added to the list of celebrities whose social media accounts have been compromised. According to Bleeping Computer, a hacker group managed to take control of the actor’s Instagram account, sharing enticing but phony giveaway announcements.

The offers posted by the hackers included 2,000 iPhone XS devices, MacBook Pro laptops, Tesla cars, and more. In addition to the giveaways added to the actor’s story page, the hackers also changed the link in his account bio, pointing followers to a survey page designed to collect their personal information that could be used for other scams. The tricky part? The hackers posted the link using the URL shortening service Bitly, preventing followers from noticing any clues as to whether the link was malicious or not.

This incident serves as a reminder that anyone with an online account can be vulnerable to a cyberattack, whether you have superpowers or not. In fact, over 22% of internet users reported that their online accounts have been hacked at least once, and more than 14% said that they were hacked more than once. Luckily, there are some best practices you can follow to help keep your accounts safe and sound:

  • Don’t interact with suspicious messages, links, or posts. If you come across posts with offers that seem too good to be true, they probably are. Use your best judgment and don’t click on suspicious messages or links, even if they appear to be posted by a friend.
  • Alert the platform. Flag any scam posts or messages you encounter on social media to the platform so they can stop the threat from spreading.
  • Use good password hygiene. Make sure all of your passwords are strong and unique.
  • Don’t post personal information. Posting personally identifiable information on social media could potentially allow a hacker to guess answers to your security questions or make you an easier target for a cyberattack. Keep your personal information under wraps and turn your account to private.

To stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Attention Facebook Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Recent Breach

With over 2.4 billion monthly active users, Facebook is the biggest social network worldwide. And with so many users come tons of data, including some personal information that may now potentially be exposed. According to TechCrunch, a security researcher found an online database exposing 419 million user phone numbers linked to Facebook accounts.

It appears that the exposed server wasn’t password-protected, meaning that anyone with internet access could find the database. This server held records containing a user’s unique Facebook ID and the phone number associated with the account. In some cases, records also revealed the user’s name, gender, and location by country. TechCrunch was able to verify several records in the database by matching a known Facebook user’s phone number with their listed Facebook ID. Additionally, TechCrunch was able to match some phone numbers against Facebook’s password reset feature, which partially reveals a user’s phone number linked to their account.

It’s been over a year since Facebook restricted public access to users’ phone numbers. And although the owner of the database wasn’t found, it was pulled offline after the web host was contacted. Even though there has been no evidence that the Facebook accounts were compromised as a result of this breach, it’s important for users to do everything they can to protect their data. Here are some tips to keep in your cybersecurity arsenal:

  • Change your password. Most people will rotate between the same three passwords for all of their accounts. While this makes it easier to remember your credentials, it also makes it easier for hackers to access more than one of your accounts. Try using a unique password for every one of your accounts or employ a password manager.
  • Enable two-factor authentication. While a strong and unique password is a good first line of defense, enabling app-based two-factor authentication across your accounts will help your cause by providing an added layer of security.

And, of course, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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iPhone Users: Here’s What You Need to Know About the Latest iOS Hacks

iPhone hacks have often been considered by some to be a rare occurrence. However, a group of Google researchers recently discovered that someone has been exploiting multiple iPhone vulnerabilities for the last two years. How? Simply by getting users to visit a website.

How exactly does this exploitation campaign work? According to WIRED, researchers revealed a handful of websites that had assembled five exploit chains. These exploit chains are tools that link security vulnerabilities together and allow a hacker to penetrate each layer of iOS digital protections. This campaign took advantage of 14 security flaws, resulting in the attacker gaining complete control over a user’s phone. Researchers state that these malicious sites were programmed to assess the Apple devices that loaded them and compromise the devices with powerful monitoring malware if possible. Once the malware was installed, it could monitor live location data, grab photos, contacts, passwords, or other sensitive information from the iOS Keychain.

So, what makes this attack unique? For starters, this exploitation campaign hides in plain sight, uploading information without any encryption. If a user monitored their network traffic, they would notice activity as their data was being uploaded to the hacker’s server. Additionally, a user would be able to see suspicious activity if they connected their device to their computer and reviewed console logs. Console logs show the codes for the programs being run on the device. However, since this method would require a user to take the extra step of plugging their iPhone into a computer, it’s highly unlikely that they would notice the suspicious activity.

Although iOS exploits usually require a variety of complexities to be successful, this exploitation campaign proves that iOS hacking is very much alive and kicking. So, what can Apple users do to help ward off these kinds of attacks? Here’s how you can help keep your device secure:

  • Install automatic updates. In your device settings, choose to have automatic updates installed on your device. This will ensure that you have the latest security patches for vulnerabilities like the ones leveraged in these exploit chains as soon as they’re available.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Introduction to “Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” a book by Gary Davis

“Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?” explores the modern implications of our human nature: our inherent inclination to share our experiences, specifically on the internet. Our increasing reliance on technology to connect with others has us sharing far more information about ourselves than we realize, and without a full understanding of the risks involved.

While we’re posting innocent poolside pictures, we’re also creating a collection of highly personal information. And not just on social media. It happens by simply going about our day. Whether it is the computers we use for work and play, the smartphones that are nearly always within arm’s reach, or the digital assistants that field household requests—all of these devices capture and share data about our habits, our interests, and even our comings and goings. Yet we largely don’t know it’s happening—or, for that matter, with whom we’re sharing this information, and to what end.

I wrote this book for anyone who wants to live online as safely and privately as possible, for the sake of themselves and their family. And that should be plenty of us. With news of data breaches, companies sharing our personal information without our knowledge, and cybercrime robbing the global economy of an estimated $600 billion a year, it’s easy to feel helpless. But we’re not. There are things we can do. It’s time to understand how we’re creating all this personal information so we can control its flow, and who has access to it. The book takes an even-handed look at the most prevalent privacy and security challenges facing individuals and families today. It skips the scare tactics that can dominate the topic, and illustrates the steps each of us can take to lead more private and secure lives in an increasingly connected world.

The notion that binds the book together is the idea of a personal data lake. “Data lake” is a widely used term in business to reflect a large repository of data that companies collect and store. In the book I explore how we create personal data lakes as we go about our digital lives. I explore how our data lakes fill as we do more and more activities online, and offer insights that can be used to protect our personal data lakes, so that we can live more privately and enjoy safe online experiences.

This book is for people in families of any size or structure. It looks at security and privacy across the stages of life, and explores the roles each of us play in those stages, from birth to the time we eventually leave a digital legacy behind, along with important milestones and transitional periods in between. You’ll see how security and privacy are pertinent at every step of your digital journey, and how specific age groups have concerns that are often unique to that stage of life. The structure allows you to easily navigate to the chapters and sections that most relate to the life stage you are in, and offers guidance.

This book, like most things in life, is about choice. You can choose to roll the dice and hope that you’re not one of the hundreds of millions who are victims each year of phishing scams, ransomware attacks, and identity theft, or among the handful of people who still fall for the Nigerian prince lottery scam. You can also choose to use your computers, tablets, smartphones, and personal assistants as you have been, letting companies grift all kinds of personal information from you, without your knowledge or consent. Or you can choose to embrace the guidelines outlined in the book and make it extremely more difficult for a bad actor or cybercriminal to make you or your loved ones a victim.

Gary Davis’ book, Is Your Digital Front Door Unlocked?, is available September 5, 2019 and can be ordered at amazon.com.

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14 Million Customers Affected By Hostinger Breach: How to Secure Your Data

Whether you’re a small business owner or a blogger, having an accessible website is a must. That’s why many users look to web hosting companies so they can store the files necessary for their websites to function properly. One such company is Hostinger. This popular web, cloud, and virtual private server hosting provider and domain registrar boasts over 29 million users. But according to TechCrunch, the company recently disclosed that it detected unauthorized access to a database containing information on 14 million customers.

Let’s dive into the details of this breach. Hostinger received an alert on Friday that a server had been accessed by an unauthorized third party. The server contained an authorization token allowing the alleged hacker to obtain further access and escalate privileges to the company’s systems, including an API (application programming interface) database. An API database defines the rules for interacting with a particular web server for a specific use. In this case, the API server that was breached was used to query the details about clients and their accounts. The database included non-financial information including customer usernames, email addresses, hashed passwords, first names, and IP addresses.

Since the breach, Hostinger stated that it has identified the origin of the unauthorized access and the vulnerable system has since been secured. As a precaution, the company reset all user passwords and is in contact with respective authorities to further investigate the situation.

Although no financial data was exposed in this breach, it’s possible that cybercriminals can use the data from the exposed server to carry out several other malicious schemes. To protect your data from these cyberattacks, check out the following tips:

  • Be vigilant about checking your accounts. If you suspect that your data has been compromised, frequently check your accounts for unusual activity. This will help you stop fraudulent activity in its tracks.
  • Reset your password. Even if your password wasn’t automatically reset by Hostinger, update your credentials as a precautionary measure.
  • Practice good password hygiene. A cybercriminal can crack hashed passwords, such as the ones exposed in this breach, and use the information to access other accounts using the same password. To avoid this, make sure to create a strong, unique password for each of your online accounts.

And, as always, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Ellen DeGeneres Instagram Hack: What You Can Do to Protect Your Account

Today was not an easy morning for Ellen DeGeneres. She woke to find that her Instagram account was briefly hacked according to the talk show host’s Twitter and Yahoo Entertainment. A series of giveaways offering free Tesla cars, MacBooks, and more, were posted to the talk show host’s account last night. After seeing the posts, some of her followers became skeptical and warned her of the suspicious behavior. They were smart to flag the giveaways as untrustworthy because DeGeneres confirmed that her Instagram was in fact affected by malicious activity.

While Ellen joked about “password” not being the most secure password, it’s always a best practice to use strong passwords that differ from each of your other accounts to avoid easy break-ins from cybercriminals.

One of the central reasons hackers target social media accounts is to retrieve stored personal information. Once cybercriminals log into an account, they have access to everything that has ever been shared with the platform, such as date of birth, email, hometown, and answers to security questions. They then could potentially use this information to try to log into other accounts or even steal the person’s identity, depending on the level of information they have access to.

Another motive for hijacking a user’s social media account is to spread phishing scams or malware amongst the user’s network. In DeGeneres’ case, her 76 million Instagram followers were prompted to click on links that were scams disguised as giveaways so hackers could steal their personal information. In other cases, hackers will use adware so they can profit off of clicks and gain access to even more valuable information from you and your contacts. Sometimes these cybercriminals will post publicly on your behalf to reach your entire network, and other times they will read through private messages and communicate with your close network directly.

It’s not just celebrities that are vulnerable to cybercriminals. In fact, over 22% of internet users reported that their online accounts have been hacked at least once, and more than 14% said that they were hacked more than once. If your account gets hacked, the first step is to change your password right away and notify your network, so they don’t click on any specious links.

The good news is that by taking proper precautions, you can significantly reduce risk to help keep your account safe. Here are five best practices for protecting your social media accounts from malicious activity:

  • Use your best judgment and don’t click on suspicious messages or links, even if they appear to be posted by a friend.
  • Flag any scam posts or messages you encounter on social media to the platform, so they can help stop the threat from spreading.
  • Use unique, complicated passwords for all your accounts.
  • Avoid posting any identifying information or personal details that might allow a hacker to guess your security questions.
  • Always use comprehensive security software that can keep you protected from the latest threats.

To stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Lights, Camera, Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know About the MoviePass Breach

If you’re a frequent moviegoer, there’s a chance you may have used or are still using movie ticket subscription service and mobile app MoviePass. The service is designed to let film fanatics attend a variety of movies for a convenient price, however, it has now made data convenient for cybercriminals to potentially get ahold of. According to TechCrunch, the exposed database contained 161 million records, with many of those records including sensitive user information.

So, what exactly do these records include? The exposed user data includes 58,000 personal credit cards and customer card numbers, which are similar to normal debit cards. They are issued by Mastercard and store a cash balance that users can use to pay so they can watch a catalog of movies. In addition to the MoviePass customer cards and financial information numbers, other exposed data includes billing addresses, names, and email addresses. TechCrunch reported that a combination of this data could very well be enough information to make fraudulent purchases.

The database also contained what researchers presumed to be hundreds of incorrectly typed passwords with user email addresses. With this data, TechCrunch attempted to log into the database using a fake email and password combination. Not only did they immediately gain access to the MoviePass account, but they found that the fake login credentials were then added to the database.

Since then, TechCrunch reached out to MoviePass and the company has since taken the database offline. However, with this personal and financial information publicly accessible for quite some time, users must do everything in their power to safeguard their data. Here are some tips to help keep your sensitive information secure:

  • Review your accounts. Be sure to look over your credit card and banking statements and report any suspicious activity as soon as possible.
  • Place a fraud alert. If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.
  • Consider using identity theft protection. A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity.

And, as always, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Boost Your Bluetooth Security: 3 Tips to Prevent KNOB Attacks

Many of us use Bluetooth technology for its convenience and sharing capabilities. Whether you’re using wireless headphones or quickly Airdropping photos to your friend, Bluetooth has a variety of benefits that users take advantage of every day. But like many other technologies, Bluetooth isn’t immune to cyberattacks. According to Ars Technica, researchers have recently discovered a weakness in the Bluetooth wireless standard that could allow attackers to intercept device keystrokes, contact lists, and other sensitive data sent from billions of devices.

The Key Negotiation of Bluetooth attack, or “KNOB” for short, exploits this weakness by forcing two or more devices to choose an encryption key just a single byte in length before establishing a Bluetooth connection, allowing attackers within radio range to quickly crack the key and access users’ data. From there, hackers can use the cracked key to decrypt data passed between devices, including keystrokes from messages, address books uploaded from a smartphone to a car dashboard, and photos.

What makes KNOB so stealthy? For starters, the attack doesn’t require a hacker to have any previously shared secret material or to observe the pairing process of the targeted devices. Additionally, the exploit keeps itself hidden from Bluetooth apps and the operating systems they run on, making it very difficult to spot the attack.

While the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (the body that oversees the wireless standard) has not yet provided a fix, there are still several ways users can protect themselves from this threat. Follow these tips to help keep your Bluetooth-compatible devices secure:

  • Adjust your Bluetooth settings. To avoid this attack altogether, turn off Bluetooth in your device settings.
  • Beware of what you share. Make it a habit to not share sensitive, personal information over Bluetooth.
  • Turn on automatic updates. A handful of companies, including Microsoft, Apple, and Google, have released patches to mitigate this vulnerability. To ensure that you have the latest security patches for vulnerabilities such as this, turn on automatic updates in your device settings.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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The Cerberus Banking Trojan: 3 Tips to Secure Your Financial Data

A new banking trojan has emerged and is going after users’ Android devices. Dubbed Cerberus, this remote access trojan allows a distant attacker to take over an infected Android device, giving the attacker the ability to conduct overlay attacks, gain SMS control, and harvest the victim’s contact list. What’s more, the author of the Cerberus malware has decided to rent out the banking trojan to other cybercriminals as a means to spread these attacks.

According to The Hacker News, the author claims that this malware was completely written from scratch and doesn’t reuse code from other existing banking trojans. Researchers who analyzed a sample of the Cerberus trojan found that it has a pretty common list of features including the ability to take screenshots, hijacking SMS messages, stealing contact lists, stealing account credentials, and more.

When an Android device becomes infected with the Cerberus trojan, the malware hides its icon from the application drawer. Then, it disguises itself as Flash Player Service to gain accessibility permission. If permission is granted, Cerberus will automatically register the compromised device to its command-and-control server, allowing the attacker to control the device remotely. To steal a victim’s credit card number or banking information, Cerberus launches remote screen overlay attacks. This type of attack displays an overlay on top of legitimate mobile banking apps and tricks users into entering their credentials onto a fake login screen. What’s more, Cerberus has already developed overlay attacks for a total of 30 unique targets and banking apps.

So, what can Android users do to secure their devices from the Cerberus banking trojan? Check out the following tips to help keep your financial data safe:

  • Be careful what you download.Cerberus malware relies on social engineering tactics to make its way onto a victim’s device. Therefore, think twice about what you download or even plug into your device.
  • Click with caution.Only click on links from trusted sources. If you receive an email or text message from an unknown sender asking you to click on a suspicious link, stay cautious and avoid interacting with the message altogether.
  • Use comprehensive security. Whether you’re using a mobile banking app on your phone or browsing the internet on your desktop, it’s important to safeguard all of your devices with an extra layer of security. Use robust security software like McAfee Total Protection so you can connect with confidence.

And, of course, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Dorms, Degrees, and Data Security: Prepare Your Devices for Back to School Season

With summer coming to a close, it’s almost time for back to school! Back to school season is an exciting time for students, especially college students, as they take their first steps towards independence and embark on journeys that will shape the rest of their lives. As students across the country prepare to start or return to college, we here at McAfee have revealed new findings indicating that many are not proactively protecting their academic data. Here are the key takeaways from our survey of 1,000 Americans, ages 18-25, who attend or have attended college:

Education Needs to Go Beyond the Normal Curriculum

While many students are focused on classes like biology and business management, very few get the proper exposure to cybersecurity knowledge. 80% of students have been affected by a cyberattack or know a friend or family member who has been affected. However, 43% claim that they don’t think they will ever be a victim of a cybercrime in the future.

Educational institutions are very careful to promote physical safety, but what about cyber safety? It turns out only 36% of American students claim that they have learned how to keep personal information safe through school resources. According to 42% of our respondents, they learn the most about cybersecurity from the news. To help improve cybersecurity education in colleges and universities, these institutions should take a certain level of responsibility when it comes to training students on how they can help keep their precious academic data safe from cybercriminals.

Take Notes on Device Security

Believe it or not, many students fail to secure all of their devices, opening them up to even more vulnerabilities. While half of students have security software installed on their personal computers, this isn’t the case for their tablets or smartphones. Only 37% of students surveyed have smartphone protection, and only 13% have tablet protection. What’s more, about one in five (21%) students don’t use any cybersecurity products at all.

Class Dismissed: Cyberattacks Targeting Education Are on the Rise

According to data from McAfee Labs, cyberattacks targeting education in Q1 2019 have increased by 50% from Q4 2018. The combination of many students being uneducated in proper cybersecurity hygiene and the vast array of shared networks that these students are simultaneously logged onto gives cybercriminals plenty of opportunities to exploit when it comes to targeting universities. Some of the attacks utilized include account hijacking and malware, which made up more than 70% of attacks on these institutions from January to May of 2019. And even though these attacks are on the rise, 90% of American students still use public Wi-Fi and only 18% use a VPN to protect their devices.

Become a Cybersecurity Scholar

In order to go into this school year with confidence, students should remember these security tips:

  • Never reuse passwords. Use a unique password for each one of your accounts, even if it’s for an account that doesn’t hold a lot of personal information. You can also use a password manager so you don’t have to worry about remembering various logins.
  • Always set privacy and security settings. Anyone with access to the internet can view your social media if it’s public. Protect your identity by turning your profiles to private so you can control who can follow you. You should also take the time to understand the various security and privacy settings to see which work best for your lifestyle.
  • Use the cloud with caution. If you plan on storing your documents in the cloud, be sure to set up an additional layer of access security. One way of doing this is through two-factor authentication.
  • Always connect with caution. If you need to conduct transactions on a public Wi-Fi connection, use a virtual private network (VPN) to keep your connection secure.
  • Discuss cyber safety often. It’s just as important for families to discuss cyber safety as it is for them to discuss privacy on social media. Talk to your family about ways to identify phishing scams, what to do if you may have been involved in a data breach, and invest in security software that scans for malware and untrusted sites.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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23M CafePress Accounts Compromised: Here’s How You Can Stay Secure

You’ve probably heard of CafePress, a custom T-shirt and merchandise company allowing users to create their own unique apparel and gifts. With a plethora of users looking to make their own creative swag, it’s no surprise that the company was recently targeted in a cybercriminal ploy. According to Forbes, CafePress experienced a data breach back in February that exposed over 23 million records including unique email addresses, names, physical addresses, phone numbers, and passwords.

How exactly did this breach occur? While this information is still a bit unclear, security researcher Jim Scott stated that approximately half of the breached passwords had been exposed through gaps in an encryption method called base64 SHA1. As a result, the breach database service HaveIBeenPwned sent out an email notification to those affected letting them know that their information had been compromised. According to Engadget, about 77% of the email addresses in the breach have shown up in previous breach alerts on HaveIBeenPwned.

Scott stated that those who used CafePress through third-party applications like Facebook or Amazon did not have their passwords compromised. And even though third-party platform users are safe from this breach, this isn’t always the case. With data breaches becoming more common, it’s important for users to protect their information as best as they can. Check out the following tips to help users defend their data:

  • Check to see if you’ve been affected. If you know you’ve made purchases through CafePress recently, use this tool to check if you could have been potentially affected.
  • Place a fraud alert. If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.
  • Consider using identity theft protection. A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity.

And, of course, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Be Wary of WhatsApp Messages Offering 1000GB of Free Data

Global messaging giant WhatsApp turned 10 years old this year. It’s not unusual for companies to provide loyal customers or members with gifts to show their appreciation during these milestones. Unfortunately, cybercriminals are using this as a ploy to carry out their malicious schemes. According to Forbes, security researchers have discovered a fraudulent message promising users 1000GB of free internet data, which is a scam bringing in ad click revenue for cybercriminals.

Let’s dive into the details of this suspicious message. The text reads “WhatsApp Offers 1000GB Free Internet!” and includes a link to click on for more details. However, the link provided doesn’t use an official WhatsApp domain. Many users might find this confusing since some businesses do run their promotions through third-party organizations. Forbes states that once a user clicks on the link, they are taken to a landing page that reads “We offer you 1000 GB free internet without Wi-Fi! On the occasion of our 10th anniversary of WhatsApp.” To make the user feel like they need to act fast, the landing page also displays a bright yellow countdown sticker warning that there are a limited number of awards left.

As of now, it doesn’t appear that the link spreads malware or scrapes users’ personal information. However, the scam could eventually evolve into a phishing tactic. Additionally, the more users click on the fraudulent link, the more the cybercriminals behind this scheme rack up bogus ad clicks. This ultimately brings in revenue for the cybercrooks, encouraging them to continue creating these types of scams. For example, the domain being used by the scammers behind the WhatsApp message also hosts other fake brand-led promotional offers for Adidas, Nestle, Rolex, and more.

So, what can users do to prevent falling for these phony ads? Check out the following tips to help you stay secure:

  • Avoid interacting with suspicious messages. Err on the side of caution and don’t respond to direct messages from a company that seems out of the ordinary. If you want to know if a company is participating in a promotional offer, it is best to go directly to their official site to get more information.
  • Be careful what you click on.If you receive a message in an unfamiliar language, one that contains typos, or one that makes claims that seem too good to be true, avoid clicking on any attached links.
  • Stay secure while you browse online. Security solutions like McAfee WebAdvisor can help safeguard you from malware and warn you of phishing attempts so you can connect with confidence.

And, of course, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Capital One Data Breach: How Impacted Users Can Stay More Secure

Capital One is one of the 10 largest banks based on U.S. deposits. As with many big-name brands, cybercriminals see these companies as an ideal target to carry out large-scale attacks, which has now become a reality for the financial organization. According to CNN, approximately 100 million Capital One users in the U.S. and 6 million in Canada have been affected by a data breach exposing about 140,000 Social Security numbers, 1 million Canadian Social Insurance numbers, and 80,000 bank account numbers, and more.

According to the New York Post, the alleged hacker claimed the data was obtained through a firewall misconfiguration. This misconfiguration allowed command execution with a server that granted access to data in Capital One’s storage space at Amazon. Luckily, Capital One stated that it “immediately fixed the configuration vulnerability.”

This breach serves as a reminder that users and companies alike should do everything in their power to keep personal information protected. If you think you might have been affected by this breach, follow these tips to help you stay secure:

  • Check to see if you’ve been notified by Capital One. The bank will notify everyone who was affected by the breach and offer them free credit monitoring and identity protection services. Be sure to take advantage of the services and check out the website Capital One set up for information on this breach.
  • Review your accounts. Be sure to look over your credit card and banking statements and report any suspicious activity as soon as possible. Capital One will allow you to freeze your card so purchases can no longer be made.
  • Change your credentials. Err on the side of caution and change your passwords for all of your accounts. Taking extra precautions can help you avoid future attacks.
  • Freeze your credit. Freezing your credit will make it impossible for criminals to take out loans or open up new accounts in your name. To do this effectively, you will need to freeze your credit at each of the three major credit-reporting agencies (Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian).
  • Consider using identity theft protection. A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Capital One Data Breach: How Impacted Users Can Stay More Secure appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

4 Ways for Parents to Handle the Facebook Messenger Bug

9 out of 10 children in the U.S. between the ages of six and twelve have access to smart devices. And while parents know it’s important for their children to learn to use technology in today’s digital world, 75% want more visibility into their kids’ digital activities. This is precisely why Facebook designed Messenger Kids to empower parents to monitor their children’s safety online. However, the popular social media platform had to recently warn users of a security issue within this app for kids.

The central benefit of Messenger Kids is that children can only chat with other users their parents approve of. Yet one design flaw within the group chat feature prevented Facebook from upholding this rule. Children who started a group chat could include any of their approved connections in the conversation, even if a user was not authorized to message the other kids in the chat. As a result, thousands of children were able to connect with users their parents weren’t aware of via this flaw.

Luckily, Facebook removed the unauthorized group chats and flagged the issue to all affected users, promising that that potentially unsafe chats won’t happen again. While Facebook has not yet made a formal public response, they confirmed the bug to The Verge:

“We recently notified some parents of Messenger Kids account users about a technical error that we detected affecting a small number of group chats. We turned off the affected chats and provided parents with additional resources on Messenger Kids and online safety.”

Now, Facebook is currently working on still resolving the bug itself. However, there are still many actions parents can take to ensure that their child is safe on Facebook Messenger, and social media apps in general. Start by following these four best practices to secure your kid’s online presence:

  • Turn on automatic app updates on your child’s device. Updates usually include new and improved app features that your child will be excited to try. But more importantly, they tend to account for security bugs. Delaying updates can leave apps vulnerable to cybercriminals and turning on automatic app updates ensures that you don’t have to worry about missing one.
  • Get educated. Some parents find it helpful to use the same apps as their child to better understand how it works and what safety threats might be relevant. Facebook also offers resources online that provide guidance for staying safe, such as how and when to block a user and what kind of content is or isn’t risky to share. Additionally, it’s always a best practice to read the terms and conditions of an app before downloading to make sure you’re aware of what your child is signing up for.
  • Keep an open dialogue about online safety. It’s important to discuss your child’s online activities with them and walk them through best internet practices, such as changing passwords every so often and not clicking on links from unknown sources. That way, they’ll be better prepared for potential cyberthreats. Making the internet a part of the conversion will also help your child feel comfortable coming to you about things they might be skeptical about online.
  • Consider leveraging a security solution with parental controls. Depending on your child’s age and how much of a window you want into their online behaviors, you can leverage a solution such as McAfee Safe Family that can be helpful for creating a safe online environment. You can block certain websites and create predefined rules, which will help prevent your child from sharing comprising information.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Downloaded FaceApp? Here’s How Your Privacy Is Now Affected

If you’ve been on social media recently, you’ve probably seen some people in your feed posting images of themselves looking elderly. That’s because FaceApp, an AI face editor that went viral in 2017, is making a major comeback with the so-called FaceApp Challenge — where celebrities and others use the app’s old age filter to add decades onto their photos. While many folks have participated in the fun, there are some concerns about the way that the app operates when it comes to users’ personal privacy.

According to Forbes, over 100,000 million people have reportedly downloaded FaceApp from the Google Play Store and the app is the number one downloaded app on the Apple App Store in 121 different countries. But what many of these users are unaware of is that when they download the app, they are granting FaceApp full access to the photos they have uploaded. The company can then use these photos for their benefit, such as training their AI facial recognition algorithm. And while there is currently nothing to indicate that the app is taking photos for malicious intent, it is important for users to be aware that their personal photos may be used for other purposes beyond the original intent.

So, how can users enjoy the entertainment of apps like FaceApp without sacrificing their privacy? Follow these tips to help keep your personal information secure:

  • Think before you upload. It’s always best to err on the side of caution with any personal data and think carefully about what you are uploading or sharing. A good security practice is to only share personal data, including personal photos, when it’s truly necessary.
  • Update your settings. If you’re concerned about FaceApp having permission to access your photos, it’s time to assess the tools on your smartphone. Check which apps have access to information like your photos and location data. Change permissions by either deleting the app or changing your settings on your device.
  • Understand and read the terms. Consumers can protect their privacy by reading the Privacy Policy and terms of service and knowing who they are dealing with.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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How to Spot Phishing Lures

Phishing attacks, in which scammers try to trick you out of your private information or money, are one of the most prevalent threats we see today. Part of the problem is that the cybercriminals have numerous ways in which to hook you, either online, over the phone, or even in person.

In today’s busy world we are often bombarded with information and it can be hard to tell who to trust, and when to be wary. But given that new phishing web pages grew by 900,000 in the third-quarter of 2018 alone, costing consumers and businesses potentially billions of dollars, it’s worth learning more about common phishing lures and how to avoid them. After all, most malware is delivered by phishing attacks, and malware grew by a stunning 53% in the third quarter of last year.

The first thing you should know about phishing is that it almost always involves a form of “social engineering”, in which the scammer tries to manipulate you into trusting them for fraudulent purposes, often by pretending to be a legitimate person or business.

You can get a better idea of how this works by learning about some of the most popular threats circulating today, the first of which are a growing number of business-related scams:

  • The CEO/Executive Scam—This scam appears as an email from a leader in your organization, asking for highly sensitive information like company accounts, employee salaries and Social Security numbers, or even sensitive client information.The hackers “spoof”, or fake, the executive’s email address so it looks like a legitimate internal company email. That’s what makes this, and the other business scams, so convincing—the lure is that you want to do your job well and please your coworkers.
  • The Business Entity Scam—This one targets corporations with the clever trick of filing phony Statements of Information with the Secretary of State using the government’s website. The fraudsters then use these doctored statements to apply for hard money loans, using them to prove they have assets. This scam works because the states don’t double check corporate statements for accuracy.
  • File Sharing & DocuSign—Phony requests to access files in Dropbox accounts are on the rise, tricking workers into clicking on dangerous links that download malware. There has also been a rash of threats masquerading as requests to electronically sign documents, pretending to be legitimate services like DocuSign, which is often used for real estate and other important transactions.
  • The Urgent Email Attachment—Phishing emails that try to trick you into downloading a dangerous attachment that can potentially infect your computer and steal your private information have been around for a long time. This is because they work. You’ve probably received emails asking you to download attachments confirming a package delivery, trip itinerary, or prize. They might urge you to “respond immediately!” The lure here is offering you something you want, and invoking a sense of urgency to get you to click.
  • The “Lucky” Phone Call—How fortunate! You’ve won a free gift, an exclusive service, or a great deal on a trip to Las Vegas. Just remember, whatever “limited time offer” you’re being sold, it’s probably a phishing scam designed to get you to give up your credit card number or identity information. The lure here is something free or exciting at what appears to be little or no cost to you.
  • The Romance Scam—This one can happen completely online, over the phone, or in person once contact is established. But the romance scam always starts with someone supposedly looking for love. The scammer often puts a phony ad online, or poses as a friend-of-a-friend on social media and contacts you directly. But what starts as the promise of love or partnership, often leads to requests for money or pricey gifts. The lure here is simple—love and acceptance.
  • The Mobile Phish—Our heavy use of mobile devices have given scammers yet another avenue of attack. They may distribute fake mobile apps that secretly gather your personal information in the background, or they could send phony text messages, inviting you to click on a dangerous link. Either way, you may be misled by a false sense of trust in who has access to your mobile device. In this case, you may be lured by the convenience of an app, or expediency of a message.

Here are some more smart ways not to get hooked:

  • Be wary of anyone who asks for more information than they need, even if you are talking to a company or bank you do business with.
  • When responding to a message, first check to see if you recognize the sender’s name and email address.
  • Before clicking on a link, hover over it to see if the URL address looks legitimate.
  • Before logging into an online account, make sure the web address is correct.
    Phishers often forge legitimate websites, like online storage accounts, hoping to trick you into entering your login details.
  • Avoid “free” offers, or deals that sound too good to be true. They probably are.
  • Review your bank statements and business filings on a regular basis to check for suspicious activities.
  • Always use comprehensive security software to protect your devices and information from malware and other threats that might result from a phishing scam.

Looking for more mobile security tips and trends? Be sure to follow @McAfee Home on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

 

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Ready, Set, Shop: Enjoy Amazon Prime Day Without the Phishing Scams

Amazon Prime Day is becoming one of the hottest shopping periods for the summer. However, it is also becoming one of the hottest opportunities for cybercriminals, as hackers target shoppers in a number of ways during peak shopping moments to steal personal data or financial information. In fact, researchers at McAfee Labs have uncovered a phishing kit specifically created to steal personal information from Amazon customers in America and Japan.

How exactly does this phishing kit work? The kit allows hackers to create phishing emails that look like they have come from Amazon. The emails prompt users to share their login credentials on a malicious website. Once the victim hands over their login, the hackers can use the victim’s account to make fraudulent purchases and steal their credit card information saved in their Prime account.

According to McAfee Labs researchers, this phishing scam has already seen widespread use, with over 200 malicious URLs being used to prey on innocent online shoppers. Additionally, the phishing kit is being sold through an active Facebook group with over 300 members and 200 posts in recent weeks. McAfee has notified Facebook of the existence of this group. The social network has taken an active posture in recent months of taking down groups transacting in such malicious content.

So, what does this threat mean for Amazon users? If you’re planning on participating in Prime Day, follow these security steps to help you swerve malicious cyberattacks:

  • Beware of bogus deals. If you see an ad for Prime Day that looks too good to be true, chances are that the ad isn’t legitimate.
  • Think before you click. Be skeptical of ads shared on social media sites, emails, and messages sent to you through platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and WhatsApp. If you receive a suspicious message regarding Prime Day, it’s best to avoid interacting with the message.
  • Do your due diligence with discount codes. If a discount code lands in your inbox, you’re best off verifying it through Amazon.com directly rather than clicking on any links.

If you do suspect that your Amazon Prime account has been compromised due to a cyberthreat, take the following steps:

  • Change your password. Change the passwords to any accounts you suspect may have been impacted. Make sure they are strong and unique.
  • Keep an eye on your bank account. One of the simplest ways to determine whether someone is fraudulently using your credit card information is to monitor your bank statements. If you see any charges that you did not make, report it to the authorities immediately.
  • Consider using identity theft protection.A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Is Your WhatsApp Being Weird? You May Need to Check For Hidden Malware

With over 2.5 billion monthly active users that have accumulated since its fruition, Android has seen massive growth over the last 10 years. With so many users, it’s no wonder why cybercriminals continuously look to exploit Android devices. In fact, 25 million Android users have recently been hit with a new malware.

Dubbed Agent Smith, this cyberthreat sneaks onto a user’s device when the user downloads a malicious app from the app store, like a photo utility or game app. The app then silently installs the malware disguised as a legitimate Google updating tool. However, no updating icon appears on the screen, making the user oblivious to their device being in danger. Once installed, the malware replaces legitimate apps on the user’s phone, such as WhatsApp, with an evil update that serves bad ads. According to security researchers, the ads themselves aren’t malicious. But if a victim accidentally clicks on the ad, the hackers can make money from these ad fraud schemes. What’s more, there’s potential that these bad ads aren’t limited to just WhatsApp and could be found on other platforms as well.

So, what can Android users do to prevent this malware from sneaking onto their device? Check out the following tips to help stay secure:

  • Be wary of WhatsApp ads. Android users should take action if they experience advertisements displayed at strange times, such as when they open WhatsApp. The legitimate WhatsApp does not serve ads, so if you experience ads on this platform your device might have been infected.
  • Look out for suspicious apps. Check the apps and notifications section of your Android settings. If you see suspicious apps with names such as Google Updater, Google Installer for U, Google Powers, and Google Installer, uninstall these apps right away.
  • Stay away from unofficial Android stores. Google has extra precautions designed to prevent malware from getting onto the official Android store website, so only downloading apps from there could help protect you.
  • Use a security solution. A solution like McAfee Mobile Security can help Android users stay protected from threats like mobile malware. It also provides a free antivirus cleaner and phone security app to protect your online privacy and enhance device performance.

And, as always, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home  on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Watch Your Webcam: Tips to Protect Your Mac From Zoom Hackers

You’ve probably heard of the popular video conferencing platform, Zoom. This platform enables its millions of users in various locations to virtually meet face to face. In an effort to enhance user experience and work around changes in Safari 12, Zoom installed a web server that allows users to enjoy one-click-to-join meetings. Unfortunately, a security researcher recently disclosed that this product feature acts as a flaw that could allow cybercriminals to activate a Mac user’s webcam without their permission.

How exactly does this vulnerability work? Cybercriminals are able to exploit a feature that allows users to send a meeting link directly to a recipient. When the recipient clicks on the link, they are automatically launched into the video conferencing software. If the user has previously installed the Zoom app onto their Mac and hasn’t turned off their camera for meetings, Zoom will auto-join the user to a conference call with the camera on. With this flaw, an attacker can send a victim a meeting link via email message or web server, allowing them to look into a victim’s room, office, or wherever their camera is pointing. It’s important to note that even if a user has deleted the Zoom app from their device, the Zoom web server remains, making the device susceptible to this vulnerability.

While the thought of someone unknowingly accessing a user’s Mac camera is creepy, this vulnerability could also result in a Denial of Service (DoS) attack by overwhelming a user’s device with join requests. And even though this patch has been successfully patched by Zoom, it’s important for users to realize that this update is not enforced by the platform. So, how can Zoom users avoid getting sucked into a potentially malicious call? Check out these security tips to stay secure on conference calls:

  • Adjust your Zoom settings. Users can disable the setting that allows Zoom to turn your camera on when joining a meeting. This will prevent a hacker from accessing your camera if you are sent a suspicious meeting link.
  • Update, update, update. Be sure to manually install the latest Zoom update to prevent DoS or other potential attacks. Additionally, Zoom will introduce an update in July that allows users to apply video preferences from their first call to all future calls. This will ensure that if a user joins their first meeting without video, this setting will remain consistent for all other calls.

And, as usual, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home  on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Is Your Smart Home Secure? 5 Tips to Help You Connect Confidently

With so many smart home devices being used today, it’s no surprise that users would want a tool to help them manage this technology. That’s where Orvibo comes in. This smart home platform helps users manage their smart appliances such as security cameras, smart lightbulbs, thermostats, and more. Unfortunately, the company left an Elasticsearch server online without a password, exposing billions of user records.

The database was found in mid-June, meaning it’s been exposed to the internet for two weeks. The database appears to have cycled through at least two billion log entries, each containing data about Orvibo SmartMate customers. This data includes customer email addresses, the IP address of the smart home devices, Orvibo usernames, and hashed passwords.

 

More IoT devices are being created every day and we as users are eager to bring them into our homes. However, device manufacturers need to make sure that they are creating these devices with at least the basic amount of security protection so users can feel confident utilizing them. Likewise, it’s important for users to remember what risks are associated with these internet-connected devices if they don’t practice proper cybersecurity hygiene. Taking the time to properly secure your devices can mean the difference between a cybercriminal accessing your home network or not. Check out these tips to help you remain secure when using your IoT devices:

  • Research before you buy. Although you might be eager to get the latest device, some are made more secure than others. Look for devices that make it easy to disable unnecessary features, update software, or change default passwords. If you already have an older device that lacks these features, consider upgrading.
  • Safeguard your devices. Before you connect a new IoT device to your network, be sure to change the default username and password to something strong and unique. Hackers often know the default settings of various IoT devices and share them online for others to expose. Turn off other manufacturer settings that don’t benefit you, like remote access, which could be used by cybercriminals to access your system.
  • Update, update, update. Make sure that your device software is always up-to-date. This will ensure that you’re protected from any known vulnerabilities. For some devices, you can even turn on automatic updates to ensure that you always have the latest software patches installed.
  • Secure your network. Just as it’s important to secure your actual device, it’s also important to secure the network it’s connected to. Help secure your router by changing its default name and password and checking that it’s using an encryption method to keep communications secure. You can also look for home network routers or gateways that come embedded with security software like McAfee Secure Home Platform.
  • Use a comprehensive security solution. Use a solution like McAfee Total Protection to help safeguard your devices and data from known vulnerabilities and emerging threats.

And, as always, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home  on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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#Verified or Phishing Victim? 3 Tips to Protect Your Instagram Account

If you’re an avid Instagram user, chances are you’ve come across some accounts with a little blue checkmark next to the username. This little blue tick is Instagram’s indication that the account is verified. While it may seem insignificant at first glance, this badge actually means that Instagram has confirmed that the account is an authentic page of a public figure, celebrity, or global brand. In today’s world of social media influencers, receiving a verified badge is desirable so other users know you’re a significant figure on the platform. However, cybercriminals are taking advantage of the appeal of being Instagram verified as a way to convince users to hand over their credentials.

So, how do cybercriminals carry out this scheme? According to security researcher Luke Leal, this scam was distributed as a phishing page through Instagram. The page resembled a legitimate Instagram submission page, prompting victims to apply for verification. After clicking on the “Apply Now” button, victims were taken to a series of phishing forms with the domain “Instagramforbusiness[.]info.” These forms asked users for their Instagram logins as well as confirmation of their email and password credentials. However, if the victim submitted the form, their Instagram credentials would make their way into the cybercriminal’s email inbox. With this information, the cybercrooks would have unauthorized access to the victim’s social media page. What’s more, since this particular phishing scam targets a user’s associated email login, hackers would have the capability of resetting and verifying ownership of the victim’s account.

Whether you’re in search of an Instagram verification badge or not, it’s important to be mindful of your cybersecurity. And with Social Media Day right around the corner, check out these tips to keep your online profiles protected from phishing and other cyberattacks:

  • Exercise caution when inspecting links. If you examine the link used for this scam (Instagramforbusiness[.]info), you can see that it is not actually affiliated with Instagram.com. Additionally, it doesn’t use the secure HTTPS protocol, indicating that it is a risky link. Always inspect a URL before you click on it. And if you can’t tell whether a link is malicious or not, it’s best to avoid interacting with it altogether.
  • Don’t fall for phony pages. If you or a family member is in search of a verified badge for their Instagram profile, make sure they are familiar with the process. Instagram users should go into their own account settings and click on “Request on verification” if they are looking to become verified. Note that Instagram will not ask for your email or password during this process, but will send you a verification link via email instead.
  • Reset your password. If you suspect that a hacker is attempting to gain control of your account, play it safe by resetting your password.

And, as usual, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home  on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Process Reimaging: A Cybercrook’s New Disguise for Malware

As of early 2019, Windows 10 is running on more than 700 million devices, including PCs, tablets, phones, and even some gaming consoles. However, it turns out the widespread Windows operating system has some inconsistencies as to how it specifically determines process image file locations on disk. Our McAfee Advanced Threat Research team decided to analyze these inconsistencies and as a result uncovered a new cyberthreat called process reimaging. Similar to process doppelganging and process hollowing, this technique evades security measures, but with greater ease since it doesn’t require code injection. Specifically, this technique affects the ability for a Windows endpoint security solution to detect whether a process executing on the system is malicious or benign, allowing a cybercrook to go about their business on the device undetected.

Let’s dive into the details of this threat. Process reimaging leverages built-in Windows APIs, or application programming interfaces, which allow applications and the operating system to communicate with one another. One API dubbed K32GetProcessImageFileName allows endpoint security solutions, like Windows Defender, to verify whether an EXE file associated with a process contains malicious code. However, with process reimaging, a cybercriminal could subvert the security solution’s trust in the windows operating system APIs to display inconsistent FILE_OBJECT names and paths. Consequently, Windows Defender misunderstands which file name or path it is looking at and can no longer tell if a process is trustworthy or not. By using this technique, cybercriminals can persist malicious processes executing on a user’s device without them even knowing it.

So, the next question is — what can Windows users do to protect themselves from this potential threat? Check out these insights to help keep your device secure:

  • Update your software. Microsoft has issued a partial fix that stops cybercriminals from exploiting file names to disguise malicious code, which helps address at least part of the issue for Windows Defender only. And while file paths are still viable for exploitation, it’s worth updating your software regularly to ensure you always have the latest security patches, as this is a solid practice to work into your cybersecurity routine.
  • Work with your endpoint security vendor. To help ensure you’re protected from this threat, contact your endpoint security provider to see if they protect against process reimaging.

And, as always, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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3 Tips Venmo Users Should Follow to Keep Their Transactions Secure

You’ve probably heard of Venmo, the quick and convenient peer-to-peer mobile payments app. From splitting the check when eating out with friends to dividing the cost of bills, Venmo is an incredibly easy way to share money. However, users’ comfort with the app can sometimes result in a few negligent security practices. In fact, computer science student Dan Salmon recently scraped seven million Venmo transactions to prove that users’ public activity can be easily obtained if they don’t have the right security settings flipped on. Let’s explore his findings.

By scraping the company’s developer API, Salmon was able to download millions of transactions across a six-month span. That means he was able to see who sent money to who, when they sent it, and why – just as long as the transaction was set to “public.” Mind you, Salmon’s download comes just a year after that of a German researcher, who downloaded over 200 million transactions from the public-by-default app last year.

These data scrapes, if anything, act as a demonstration. They prove to users just how crucial it is to set up online mobile payment apps with caution and care. Therefore, if you’re a Venmo or other mobile payment app user, make sure to follow these tips in order to keep your information secure:

  • Set your settings to “private” immediately. Only the sender and receiver should know about a monetary transaction in the works. So, whenever you go to send money on Venmo or any other mobile payment app, make sure the transaction is set to “private.” For Venmo users specifically, you can flip from “public” to “private” by just toggling the setting at the bottom right corner of main “Pay or Request” page.
  • Limit the amount of data you share. Just because something is designed to be social doesn’t mean it should become a treasure trove of personal data. No matter the type of transaction you’re making, always try to limit the amount of personal information you include in the corresponding message. That way, any potential cybercriminals out there won’t be able to learn about your spending habits.
  • Add on extra layers of security. Beyond flipping on the right in-app security settings, it’s important to take any extra precautions you can when it comes to protecting your financial data. Create complex logins to your mobile payment apps, participate in biometric options if available, and ensure your mobile device itself has a passcode as well. This will all help ensure no one has access to your money but you.

And, as always, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Bargain or Bogus Booking? Learn How to Securely Plan Summer Travel

With summertime just around the corner, families are eagerly looking to book their next getaway. Since vacation is so top-of-mind during the summer months, users are bound to come across websites offering cheap deals on flights, accommodations, and other experiences and activities. With so many websites claiming to offer these “can’t-miss deals,” how do you know who to trust?

It turns out that this is a common concern among folks looking for a little summer getaway. According to our recent survey of 8,000 people across the UK, US, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Spain, and Singapore, 54% of respondents worry about their identity being stolen while booking and purchasing travel and accommodation online. However, 27% don’t check the authenticity of a website before booking their vacation online. Over half of these respondents say that it doesn’t cross their minds to do so.

These so-called “great deals” can be difficult to pass up. Unfortunately, 30% of respondents have been defrauded thanks to holiday travel deals that were just too good to be true. What’s more, 46.3% of these victims didn’t realize they had been ripped off until they arrived at their holiday rental to find that the booking wasn’t actually valid.

In addition to avoiding bogus bookings, users should also refrain from risky online behavior while enjoying their summer holidays. According to our survey, 44.5% of respondents are putting themselves at risk while traveling by not checking the security of their internet connection or willingly connecting to an unsecured network. 61% also stated that they never use a VPN, while 22% don’t know what a VPN is.

Unfortunately, travel-related attacks aren’t limited to just travelers either; hotels are popular targets for cybercriminals. According to analysis conducted by the McAfee Advanced Threat Research team, the most popular attack vectors are POS malware and account hijacking. Due to these attacks, eager vacationers have had their customer payment, credit card data, and personally identifiable information stolen. In order for users to enjoy a worry-free vacation this summer, it’s important that they are aware of the potential cyberthreats involved when booking their trips online and what they can do to prevent them.

We here at McAfee are working to help inform users of the risks they face when booking through unsecured or unreliable websites as well as when they’re enjoying some summertime R&R. Check out the following tips so you can enjoy your vacation without questioning the status of your cybersecurity:

  • Always connect with caution. If you need to conduct transactions on a public Wi-Fi connection, use a virtual private network (VPN) to help keep your connection secure.
  • Think before you click. Often times, cybercriminals use phishing emails or fake sites to lure consumers into clicking links for products or services that could lead to malware. If you receive an email asking you to click on a link with a suspicious URL, it’s best to avoid interacting with the message altogether.
  • Browse with security protection. Use a comprehensive security solution, like McAfee Total Protection, which includes McAfee WebAdvisor that can help identify malicious websites.
  • Utilize an identity theft solution. With all this personal data floating around online, it’s important to stay aware of any attempts to steal your identity. Use an identity theft solution, such as McAfee Identity Theft Protection, that can help protect personally identifiable information from identity theft and fraud.

And, as always, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Bargain or Bogus Booking? Learn How to Securely Plan Summer Travel appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

1.1M Emuparadise Accounts Exposed in Data Breach

If you’re an avid gamer or know someone who is, you might be familiar with the retro gaming site Emuparadise. This website boasts a large community, a vast collection of gaming music, game-related videos, game guides, magazines, comics, video game translations, and more. Unfortunately, news just broke that Emuparadise recently suffered a data breach in April 2018, exposing the data of about 1.1 million of their forum members.

The operators of the hacked-database search engine, DeHashed, shared this compromised data with the data breach reference site Have I Been Pwned. According to the site’s owner Troy Hunt, the breach impacted 1,131,229 accounts and involved stolen email addresses, IP addresses, usernames, and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes. Password salting is a process of securing passwords by inputting unique, random data to users’ passwords. However, the MD5 algorithm is no longer considered sufficient for protecting passwords, creating cause for cybersecurity concern.

Emuparadise forced a credential reset after the breach occurred in April 2018. It’s important that users of Emuparadise games take steps to help protect their private information. If you know someone who’s an avid gamer, pass along the following tips to help safeguard their security:

  • Change up your password. If you have an Emuparadise account, you should change up your account password and email password immediately. Make sure the next one you create is strong and unique so it’s more difficult for cybercriminals to crack. Include numbers, lowercase and uppercase letters, and symbols. The more complex your password is, the better!
  • Keep an eye out for sketchy emails and messages. Cybercriminals can leverage stolen information for phishing emails and social engineering scams. If you see something sketchy or from an unknown source in your email inbox, be sure to avoid clicking on any links provided.
  • Check to see if you’ve been affected. If you or someone you know has made an Emuparadise account, use this tool to check if you could have been potentially affected.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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4 Tips to Protect Your Information During Medical Data Breaches

As the companies we trust with our data become more digital, it’s important for users to realize how this affects their own cybersecurity. Take your medical care provider, for instance. You walk into a doctor’s office and fill out a form on a clipboard. This information is then transferred to a computer where a patient Electronic Health Record is created or added to. We trust that our healthcare provider has taken the proper precautions to safely store this data. Unfortunately, medical data breaches are on the rise with a 70% increase over the past seven years. In fact, medical testing company LabCorp just announced that it experienced a breach affecting approximately 7.7 million customers.

How exactly did this breach occur? The information was exposed as a result of an issue with a third-party billing collections vendor, American Medical Collection Agency (AMCA). The information exposed includes names, addresses, birth dates, balance information, and credit card or bank account information provided by customers to AMCA. This breach comes just a few days after Quest Diagnostics, another company who worked with AMCA, announced that they too experienced a breach affecting 11.9 million users.

Luckily, LabCorp stated that they do not store or maintain Social Security numbers and insurance information for their customers. Additionally, the company provided no ordered test, lab results, or diagnostic information to AMCA. LabCorp stated that they intend to provide 200,000 affected users with more specific information regarding the breach and offer them with identity protection and credit monitoring services for two years. And after receiving information on the possible security compromise, AMCA took down its web payments page and hired an external forensics firm to investigate the situation.

Medical data is essentially nonperishable in nature, making it extremely valuable to cybercrooks. It turns out that quite a few security vulnerabilities exist in the healthcare industry, such as unencrypted traffic between servers, the ability to create admin accounts remotely, and disclosure of private information. These types of vulnerabilities could allow cybercriminals to access healthcare systems, as our McAfee Labs researchers discovered. If someone with malicious intent did access the system, they would have the ability to permanently alter medical images, use medical research data for extortion, and more.

Cybercriminals are constantly pivoting their tactics and changing their targets in order to best complete their schemes. As it turns out, medical data has become a hot commodity for cybercrooks. According to the McAfee Labs Threats Report from March 2018, the healthcare sector has experienced a 210% increase in publicly disclosed security incidents from 2016 to 2017. The McAfee Advanced Threat Research Team concluded that many of the incidents were caused by failures to comply with security best practices or to address vulnerabilities in medical software.

While medical care providers should do all that they can to ensure the security of their patients, there are steps users can take to help maintain their privacy. If you think your personal or financial information might be affected by the recent breaches, check out the following tips to help keep your personal data secure:

  • Place a fraud alert.If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.
  • Freeze your credit.Freezing your credit will make it impossible for criminals to take out loans or open up new accounts in your name. To do this effectively, you will need to freeze your credit at each of the three major credit-reporting agencies (Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian).
  • Consider using identity theft protection.A solution like McAfee Identify Theft Protection will help you to monitor your accounts, alert you of any suspicious activity, and help you to regain any losses in case something goes wrong.
  • Be vigilant about checking your accounts.If you suspect that your personal data has been compromised, frequently check your bank account and credit activity. Many banks and credit card companies offer free alerts that notify you via email or text messages when new purchases are made, if there’s an unusual charge, or when your account balance drops to a certain level. This will help you stop fraudulent activity in its tracks.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Attention Graphic Designers: It’s Time to Secure Your Canva Credentials

Online graphic design tools are extremely useful when it comes to creating resumes, social media graphics, invitations, and other designs and documents. Unfortunately, these platforms aren’t immune to malicious online activity. Canva, a popular Australian web design service, was recently breached by a malicious hacker, resulting in 139 million user records compromised.

So, how was this breach discovered? The hacker, who goes by the name GnosticPlayers, contacted a security reporter from ZDNet on May 24th and made him aware of the situation. The hacker claims to have stolen data pertaining to 1 billion users from multiple websites. The compromised data from Canva includes names, usernames, email addresses, city, and country information.

Canva claims to securely store all user passwords using the highest standards via a Bcrypt algorithm. Bcrypt is a strong, slow password-hashing algorithm designed to be difficult and time-consuming for hackers to crack since hashing causes one-way encryption. Additionally, each Canva password was salted, meaning that random data was added to passwords to prevent revealing identical passwords used across the platform. According to ZDNet, 61 million users had their passwords encrypted with the Bcrypt algorithm, resulting in 78 million users having their Gmail addresses exposed in the breach.

Canva has notified users of the breach through email and ensured that their payment card and other financial data is safe. However, even if you aren’t a Canva user, it’s important to be aware of what cybersecurity precautions you should take in the event of a data breach. Check out the following tips:

  • Change your passwords. As an added precaution, Canva is encouraging their community of users to change their email and Canva account passwords. If a cybercriminal got a hold of the exposed data, they could gain access to your other accounts if your login credentials were the same across different platforms.
  • Check to see if you’ve been affected. If you’ve used Canva and believe your data might have been exposed, use this tool to check or set an alert to be notified of other potential data breaches.
  • Secure your personal data. Use a security solution like McAfee Identity Theft Protection. If your information is compromised during a breach, Identity Theft Protection helps monitor and keep tabs on your data in case a cybercriminal attempts to use it.

And, as always, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

The post Attention Graphic Designers: It’s Time to Secure Your Canva Credentials appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Game Golf Exposure Leaves Users in a Sand Trap of Data Concerns

Apps not only provide users with a form of entertainment, but they also help us become more efficient or learn new things. One such app is Game Golf, which comes as a free app, a paid pro version with coaching tools, or with a wearable analyzer. With over 50,000 downloads on Google Play, the app helps golfers track their on-course performance and use the data to help improve their game. Unfortunately, millions of golfer records from the Game Golf app were recently exposed to anyone with an internet connection, thanks to a cloud database lacking password protection.

According to researchers, this exposure consisted of millions of records, including details on 134 million rounds of golf, 4.9 million user notifications, and 19.2 million records in an activity feed folder. Additionally, the database contained profile data like usernames, hashed passwords, emails, gender, Facebook IDs, and authorization tokens. The database also contained network information for the company behind the Game Golf app, Game Your Game Inc., including IP addresses, ports, pathways, and storage information that cybercrooks could potentially exploit to further access the network. A combination of all of this data could theoretically provide cybercriminals with more information on the user, creating greater privacy concerns. Thankfully, the database was secured about two weeks after the company was initially notified of the exposure.

Although it is still unclear as to whether cybercriminals took a swing at this data, the magnitude of the information exposed by the app is cause for concern. Luckily, users can follow these tips to help safeguard their data:

  • Change your passwords. If a cybercriminal got a hold of the exposed data, they could easily gain access into other online accounts if your login credentials were the same across different platforms. Err on the side of caution and change your passwords to something strong and unique for each account.
  • Check to see if you’ve been affected. If you’ve used the Game Golf app and believe your data might have been exposed, use this tool to check or set an alert to be notified of other potential exposures.
  • Secure your online profiles. Use a security solution like McAfee Safe Connect to encrypt your online activity, help protect your privacy by hiding your IP address, and better defend against cybercriminals.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Don’t Let Airbnb Scams Stop Your Summer Travel Plans

With summertime just around the corner, many people are planning vacations to enjoy some much-needed R&R or quality time with family and friends. Airbnb offers users a great alternative to a traditional hotel experience when they are looking to book their summer getaways. However, it appears that cybercriminals have used the popularity of the platform as a means to carry out their malicious schemes. Unfortunately, some Airbnb users are being scammed with fake rentals and account closures, whether they’re planning a trip or not.

While Airbnb stated that its platform was at no point compromised, a number of users have been charged for non-refundable reservations at fake destination homes and have had money taken out of their bank and PayPal accounts. Additionally, some users have had their account credentials changed without their permission, making it difficult to contact customer support about the fraudulent charges. For example, one user had three non-refundable reservations made in Ukraine on her account. Then, the reservations were canceled and her account was deleted all within a few minutes, making it impossible to reach Airbnb’s customer support. Luckily, the user was able to contact the vacation rental platform through the company’s Twitter account and receive a refund for the fraudulent charges.

Airbnb claimed that users’ accounts were accessed with correct login credentials that must have been “compromised elsewhere.” Regardless of how this scam originated, it’s important to take precautions when it comes to your online safety, so you can continue to use platforms like Airbnb to plan fun family vacations without any worries. Use these tips to help you stay secure:

  • Avoid unauthorized sites. Cybercriminals often use fake websites to trick users into giving up their login credentials or financial information. Make sure that the web address doesn’t contain any odd-looking characters or words. For example, “Airbnb-bookings.com” is an invalid web address.
  • Be wary of suspicious emails. If you receive an email asking you to click a link and enter personal data or one that contains a message that has a sense of urgency, proceed with caution. If the email isn’t from a legitimate, recognized Airbnb email address, it’s best to avoid interacting with the message altogether.
  • Be careful where you click. When proceeding with an Airbnb transaction, make sure that you stay on their secure platform throughout the entire process, including the payment. Know that the company will never ask you to wire money or pay a host directly.
  • Report issues. If you experience any suspicious listings, emails, or websites while trying to complete a booking, report this by emailing Airbnb at phishing@airbnb.com.
  • Use a security solution to surf the web safely. Using a tool like McAfee WebAdvisor can help you avoid dangerous websites and links and will warn you in the event that you do accidentally click on something malicious.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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3 Tips for Protecting Against the New WhatsApp Bug

Messaging apps are a common form of digital communication these days, with Facebook’s WhatsApp being one of the most popular options out there. The communication platform boasts over 1.5 billion users – who now need to immediately update the app due to a new security threat. In fact, WhatsApp just announced a recently discovered security vulnerability that exposes both iOS and Android devices to malicious spyware.

So, how does this cyberthreat work, exactly? Leveraging the new WhatsApp bug, hackers first begin the scheme by calling an innocent user via the app. Regardless of whether the user picks up or not, the attacker can use that phone call to infect the device with malicious spyware. From there, crooks can potentially snoop around the user’s device, likely without the victim’s knowledge.

Fortunately, WhatsApp has already issued a patch that solves for the problem – which means users will fix the bug if they update their app immediately. But that doesn’t mean users shouldn’t still keep security top of mind now and in the future when it comes to messaging apps and the crucial data they contain. With that said, here are a few security steps to follow:

  • Flip on automatic updates. No matter the type of application or platform, it’s always crucial to keep your software up-to-date, as fixes for vulnerabilities are usually included in each new version. Turning on automatic updates will ensure that you are always equipped with the latest security patches.
  • Be selective about what information you share. When chatting with fellow users on WhatsApp and other messaging platforms, it’s important you’re always careful of sharing personal data. Never exchange financial information or crucial personal details over the app, as they can possibly be stolen in the chance your device does become compromised with spyware or other malware.
  • Protect your mobile phones from spyware. To help prevent your device from becoming compromised by malicious software, such as this WhatsApp spyware, be sure to add an extra layer of security to it by leveraging a mobile security solution. With McAfee Mobile Security being available for both iOS and Android, devices of all types will remain protected from cyberthreats.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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