Author Archives: Dave Whitelegg

What’s the greater risk to UK 5G, Huawei backdoors or DDoS?

Have we been focusing too much on the Huawei backdoor threat instead of the DDoS threat facing the incoming 5G network infrastructure? Lee Chen, CEO at A10 networks thinks so.

The size and sophistication of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have risen at an ever-accelerating pace. As new 5G networks become operational, we expect the size of attacks will dwarf these records. This is primarily due to the increase in IoT devices that 5G will introduce, with the number set to reach 4.1 billion globally by 2024. Each device is a perfect nest for botnets carrying malware, offering a new DDoS weapon for hackers to take advantage of.

Service providers will need to evolve rapidly with these growing threats and adopt intelligent automation to detect and mitigate security anomalies in a matter of seconds. Sophisticated DDoS threat intelligence, combined with real-time threat detection and automated signature extraction, will allow the marketplace to defend against even the most massive multi-vector DDoS attacks, no matter where they originate.


The Huawei threat remains a political football, there is still uncertainty on whether the Chinese telecoms giant's network devices will be banned in the UK or not. I have updated my post - Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security? with the latest developments.

The Business of Organised Cybercrime

Guest article by David Warburton, Senior Threat Research Evangelist, F5 Networks

Team leader, network administrator, data miner, money specialist. These are just some of the roles making a difference in today’s enterprises. The same is also true for sophisticated cybergangs.

Many still wrongly believe that the dark web is exclusively inhabited by hoodie-clad teenagers and legions of disaffected disruptors. The truth is, the average hacker is just a cog in a complex ecosystem more akin to that of a corporate enterprise than you think. The only difference is the endgame, which is usually to cause reputational or financial damage to governments, businesses and consumers.

There is no way around it; cybercrime is now run like an industry with multiple levels of deceit shielding those at the very top from capture. Therefore, it’s more important than ever for businesses to re-evaluate cybercriminal perceptions and ensure effective protective measures are in place.

Current perceptions surrounding Cybergangs

Cybergangs as a collective are often structured like legitimate businesses, including partner networks, resellers and vendors. Some have even set up call centres to field interactions with ransomware victims. Meanwhile, entry-level hackers across the world are embarking on career development journeys of sorts, enjoying opportunities to learn and develop skills. 

This includes the ability to write their own tools or enhance the capabilities of others. In many ways, it is a similar path to that of an intern. They often become part of sophisticated groups or operations once their abilities reach a certain level. Indeed, a large proportion of hackers are relatively new entrants to the cybercrime game and still use low-level tools to wreak havoc. This breed of cybercriminal isn’t always widely feared by big corporations. They should be.

How Cybergangs are using Technology to Work Smarter and Cheaper

Cybergangs often work remotely across widely dispersed geographies, which makes them tricky to detect and deal with. The nature of these structures also means that cyber attacks are becoming more automated, rapid and cost-effective. The costs and risks are further reduced when factoring in the fluidity and inherent anonymity of cryptocurrencies and the dark web.

The industry has become so robust that hackers can even source work on each link in an attack chain at an affordable rate. Each link is anonymous to other threat actors in the chain to vastly reduce the risk of detection.

IoT Vulnerabilities on the Rise
According to IHS Markit, there will be 125 billion IoT devices on the planet by 2030.  With so much hype surrounding the idea of constant and pervasive connectivity, individuals and businesses are often complacent when it comes to ensuring all devices are secure. 

Significantly, it is easier to compromise an IoT device that is exposed to the public Internet and protected with known vendor default credentials than it is to trick an individual into clicking on a link in a phishing email.

Consequently, it is crucial for organisations to have an IoT strategy in place that encompasses the monitoring and identification of traffic patterns for all connected devices. Visibility is essential to understand network behaviour and any potential suspicious activities that may occur on it.

Why Cybersecurity Mindsets must Change

IT teams globally have been lecturing staff for years on the importance of creating different passwords. Overall, the message is not resonating enough.

To combat the issue, businesses need to consider alternative tactics such as password manager applications, as well as ensuring continuous security training is available and compulsory for all staff.

It is worth noting that the most commonly attacked credentials are the vendor defaults for some of the most commonly used applications in enterprise environments. Simply having a basic system hardening policy that ensures vendor default credentials are disabled or changed before the system goes live will prevent this common issue from becoming a painful breach. System hardening is a requirement in every best practice security framework or compliance requirement.

Ultimately, someone with responsibility for compliance, audit, or security should be continually reviewing access to all systems. Commonly, security teams will only focus on systems within the scope of some compliance or regulatory obligation. This can lead to failure to review seemingly innocuous systems that can occasionally result in major breaches.

In addition to continual access reviews, monitoring should be in place to detect access attacks. Brute force attacks can not only lead to a breach, they can also result in performance impacts on the targeted system or lock customers out of their accounts. As a result, there are significant financial incentives for organisations to equip themselves with appropriate monitoring procedures.

Cybergangs use many different methods to wreak havoc, making it increasingly difficult to identify attacks in a timely manner. Businesses are often ignorant about the size of attacks, the scope of what has been affected, and the scale of the operation behind them. You are operating in the dark without doing the utmost to know your enemy. Failing to do so will continue to put information, staff and customers at risk by allowing cybergangs to operate in the shadows.
David Warburton, Senior Threat Research Evangelist with F5 Labs with over 20 years’ experience in IT and security.

Is Huawei a Threat to UK National Security?

On 19th July 2018 the UK government, through the GCHQ backed Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, gave “limited assurance” that Huawei poses no threat to UK National Security. Since then the UK, EU, and NATO member government politicians and security services have all raised concerns about the nation-state cyber threat posed by the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei. 

There has been particular political unease around the Huawei provision of network infrastructure devices (i.e. switches and routers etc.) within the UK national infrastructure, devices which controls network traffic and capable of accessing the data that traverses them. Huawei has been operating in the UK market for 18 years, whether its their smart phones or a network devices, Huawei products are generally far cheaper than their competitors' equivalents. This has led to major telecoms providers such as BT, purchasing and implementing Huawei network devices within their telecommunications infrastructure and data centres, some of which are regarded as critical components within the UK national infrastructure. As such, Huawei has been subject to unfavourable security scrutiny, which has recently spilt out into political and media arenas. 


Huawei has always denied its products poses a threat, and there is no evidence of any malicious capability or activity publicly disclosure by any UK intelligence agencies or cyber security firms. But there is also the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, which states that Chinese organisations are obliged to "support, cooperate with, and collaborate in, national intelligence work".

Three nations in the intelligence alliance ‘Five Eyes’, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have effectively prohibited the installation of Huawei equipment within their generation telecommunications equipment, namely 5G networks. The remaining two members of "Five Eyes", the United Kingdom and Canada, are expected to state their position within the coming months. The UK's National Cyber Security Centre has published warnings about the Chinese company's security standards. Elsewhere, nations including France, Germany and India have expressed their concerns about the use of Huawei equipment within their telecommunications 5G upgrades.


On 4th February, a leaked draft 'Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre' 2019 report, said the issues and findings it had raised previously had not been fully addressed by Huawei, and was critical about the security of Huawei's technology.

Then on 6th February 2019,  a letter sent to MPs by Huawei was published. In it Huawei said it could take up to five years to address security issues raised by the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre, at a cost of $2bn (£1.5bn) of their own money. The president of Huawei's carrier business group also said the process of adapting its software and engineering processes to meet the UK's requirements was "like replacing components on a high-speed train in motion".

Huawei also made the following points in the letter to rebut the threat allegations,  "Huawei is a closely watched company.  Were Huawei ever to engage in malicious behaviour, it would not go unnoticed - and it would certainly destroy our business. For us, it is a matter of security or nothing; there is no third option. We choose to ensure security." The letter also addressed the Chinese 2017 National Intelligence Law, stating "no Chinese law obliges any company to install backdoors", a position they have backed up by an international law firm based in London. The letter went on to say that Huawei would refuse requests by the Chinese government to plant backdoors, eavesdropping or spyware on its telecommunications equipment.

The ball is now in the UK government's court, in the next couple of months we shall see if the UK Gov bans Huawei or continues to work with them to help assure the implied national security threat of their products. A ban could well result in Huawei pulling out of the UK market altogether, taking their billions of pounds of investment with them, and would likely negatively impact post Brexit trade deal negotiations between the UK and China, so we can expect the situation to become even more political in the short term.

Huawei Threat News Timeline
Who are Huawei?
  • Chinese multinational conglomerate which specialises in telecommunications equipment, consumer electronics and technology-based services and products.
  • HQ in Shenzhen, Guangdong
  • Founded in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the People's Liberation Army
  • Largest telecommunications-equipment manufacturer in the world
  • Overtook from Apple in 2018 as the second-largest manufacturer of smartphones in the world
  • 72nd on the Fortune Global 500 list
  • 180,000 employees
  • Chinese military remain an important customer for Huawei
  • Invests Billions into R&D around world
  • 3 Billions Customers Globally
  • Operating within the UK for 18 years
  • Made a five year commitment (2018 to 2023) to invest £3 billion in the UK.
  • Allegations its equipment may contain backdoors to allow unauthorised surveillance and/or data theft by the Chinese government and the People’s Liberation Army
The 5G Evolution
5G is expected emerge in the UK in late 2019 and early 2020, and will be much faster than 4G. The theoretical maximum speed for 4G is 1Gbps, while the theoretical maximum speed for 5G is 20Gbps, so 5G is potentially up to 20 times faster than 4G. Potentially faster than the UK average broadband speed, which stands at 18.57Gbps.

Mobile networks are changing with the arrival of 5G and the impact of this change will be felt across the industry. Adrian Taylor, regional VP of sales for A10 Networks, provides the follow insight about the impact of 5G on the market and how it will change the enterprise world.

5G and the Evolution of Mobile Networks
Fifth generation networks, just like the preceding 4G LTE and WiMAX networks, are expected to greatly increase available bandwidth, with improved end-to-end performance providing a better end-user experience. In the most basic of terms, 4G LTE was the long-term evolution of Radio Access Networks (RAN); 5G is the next iteration.

Wireless carriers have invested billions into their networks to support the ongoing demand for faster network speeds. They must look for ways to increase revenue while delivering more value to the end user. This continues to drive new devices into the hands of the consumer. The demand for increased efficiencies, bandwidth, and coverage has pushed carriers towards a decentralised deployment model.

Network Virtualisation Remains in The Early Stages
Service providers monitor and review technology for advancements that will help deliver faster and less expensive networks. Recently, they have looked into areas of Network Function Virtualisation (NFV) and automation to support their advancements. Mobile network operators are investing heavily in reducing delays and errors through repetitive processes as they build and add capacity to existing 4G networks.

Virtualisation and Software Defined Networks (SDN) improvements are driving a shift from hardware to software. SDN is promising, but it’s not an instant solution, as purpose-built hardware still remains the preferred choice. NFV and SDN have offered service providers an alternative to existing methods, including dedicated appliances sitting idle. However, it’s safe to say that the age of virtualisation remains in the early stages.


Hardware manufacturers and service providers are now betting on the acceptance and success of virtualised functions. Software development continues at breakneck speed to meet timelines and demands for more integrated solutions, which easily scale and reduce operational overheads at the same time.

The 5G Revenue Opportunity
5G’s impact is expected to extend beyond the typical mobile network carriers/operators such as Virgin Media, EE, O2, and Sky in the UK and overseas. It promises to enable increased connectivity and flexibility, that will drive additional functions throughout all supportive components of a mobile carrier’s network.

RAN access providers face the question of how to support the ever-increasing appetite for cutting the cord. How can we use our mobile devices in more ways than previously thought, as the end user goes about their daily tasks? This mobility, whether it’s tied to a carrier’s technology or even a simple Wi-Fi home network, reaches all corners of our day-to-day life.

This reach extends from the cloud to the data centre environments and continues to drive capacity needs, supported by both legacy appliances and the ever-increasing virtual environments. This continued appetite for consumption has opened up opportunities for all facets of technology and associated vendors.

5G Mobile Network Evolution
The continued expansion of 5G networks will have a revolutionary impact upon every mobile subscriber and business in the world.

The fundamental market forces of network evolution are not based on wired or wireless infrastructure. Companies are currently focused on upgrading existing mobile networks. Whereas at the exact same time, NFV, SDN and the global IoT industry are all preparing to utilise the next generation of mobile networks.

Software solutions are easier to move from concept to production and frequently offer a lower up-front investment cost. This all adds up to help drive increased functionality for all service providers, including the wired infrastructure.

5G and IoT will be demand-driven. As a result, the more the infrastructure expands to meet that demand, the more opportunities will be uncovered. It’s a positive feedback loop that will revolutionise how we think of the internet.

Get ready for a world that will be changed forever with the next generation mobile networks on the horizon.

      Customers Blame Companies not Hackers for Data Breaches

      RSA Security latest search reveals over half (57%) of consumers blame companies ahead of hackers if their data is stolen. Consumer backlash in response to the numerous high-profile data breaches in recent years has exposed one of the hidden risks of digital transformation: loss of customer trust.

      The RSA Data Privacy & Security Survey 2019 identified that companies have lost the trust of customers as a disconnect has formed between how companies are using customer data and how consumers expect their data to be used.

      Despite the fact that consumers harbour heightened concerns about their privacy, they continue to exhibit poor cyber hygiene, with 83% of users admitting that they reuse the same passwords across many sites, leaving them more vulnerable.

      Key takeaways from the RSA Data Privacy study, include:

      • Context matters: Individuals across all demographics are concerned about their financial/banking data, as well as sensitive information such as passwords, but other areas of concern vary dramatically by generation, nationality and even gender. For example, younger demographics are more comfortable with their data being used and collected than older survey respondents. 
      • Privacy expectations are cultural: Consumers respond to data privacy differently based on their nationality due to cultural factors, current events and high-profile data breaches in their respective countries. For example, in the months of the GDPR being implemented, German attitudes shifted in favour of stricter data privacy expectations, with 42% wanting to protect location data in 2018 versus only 29 percent in 2017.
      • Personalisation remains a puzzle: Countless studies have demonstrated that personalised experiences increase user activity and purchasing. However, the survey results showed that respondents do not want personalized services at the expense of their privacy. In fact, a mere 17% of respondents view tailored advertisements as ethical, and only 24% believe personalisation to create tailored newsfeeds is ethical. 
      “With a growing number of high-profile data breaches, questions around the ethical use of data and privacy missteps, consumers increasingly want to know how their data is being collected, managed and shared,” said Nigel Ng, Vice President of International, RSA. “Now is the time for organisations to evaluate their growing digital risks, doubling down on customer privacy and security. Today’s leaders must be vigilant about transforming their cybersecurity postures to manage today’s digital risks in a way that ensures consumer trust and confidence in their business.

      Automotive Technologies and Cyber Security

      A guest article authored by Giles Kirkland
      Giles is a car expert and dedicated automotive writer with a great passion for electric vehicles, autonomous cars and other innovative technologies. He loves researching the future of motorisation and sharing his ideas with auto enthusiasts across the globe. You can find him on Twitter, Facebook and at Oponeo.


      Automotive Technologies and Cyber Security
      Surveys show that about 50% of the UK feel that driverless vehicles will make their lives much easier and are eagerly anticipating the arrival of this exciting technology. Cities expect that when driverless car technology is fully implemented, the gridlock which now plagues their streets will be relieved to a large extent. Auto-makers predict that the new technology will encourage a surge in vehicle purchases, and technology companies are lining up with the major auto manufacturers to lend their experience and knowledge to the process, hoping to earn huge profits.



      Delays to Driverless Technology
      While some features of autonomous technology have already been developed and have been rolled out in various new vehicles, the full technology will probably not be mature for several decades yet. One of the chief holdups is in establishing the infrastructure necessary on the roads themselves and in cities, in order to safely enable driverless operation.

      The full weight of modern technology is pushing development along at a breakneck pace. Unlike safety testing of the past, where some real-life scenarios were simulated to anticipate vehicle reactions, high-powered simulators have now been setup to increase the rapidity at which vehicle software can 'learn' what to do in those real-life situations. This has enabled learning at a rate exponentially greater than any vehicle of the past, which is not surprising, since vehicles of the past were not equipped with 'brains' like autonomous cars will be.

      The Cyber Security aspect of Autonomous Vehicles
      Despite the enormous gains that will come from autonomous vehicles, both socially and economically, there will inevitably be some problems which will arise, and industry experts agree that the biggest of these threats is cyber security. In 2015, there was a famous incident which dramatically illustrated the possibilities. In that year, white-collar hackers took control of a Jeep Cherokee remotely by hacking into its Uconnect Internet-enabled software, and completely cut off its connection with the Internet. This glaring shortcoming caused Chrysler to immediately recall more than one million vehicles, and provided the world with an alarming illustration of what could happen if someone with criminal intent breached the security system of a vehicle.

      Cars of today have as many as 100 Electronic Control Units (ECU's), which support more than 100 million coding lines, and that presents a huge target to the criminal-minded person. Any hacker who successfully gains control of a peripheral ECU, for instance the vehicle's Bluetooth system, would theoretically be able to assume full control of other ECU's which are responsible for a whole host of safety systems. Connected cars of the future will of course have even more ECU's controlling the vehicle's operations, which will provide even more opportunities for cyber attack.


      Defense against Cyber Attacks
      As scary as the whole cyber situation sounds, with the frightening prospect of complete loss of control of a vehicle, there is reason for thinking that the threat can be managed effectively. There are numerous companies already involved in research and development on how to make cars immune from attacks, using a multi-tiered defense system involving several different security products, installed on different levels of the car's security system.

      Individual systems and ECU's can be reinforced against attacks. Up one level from that, software protection is being developed to safeguard the vehicle's entire internal network. In the layer above that, there are already solutions in place to defend vehicles at the point where ECU's connect to external sources. This is perhaps the most critical area, since it represents the line between internal and external communications. The final layer of security comes from the cloud itself. Cyber threats can be identified and thwarted before they are ever sent to a car.

      The Cyber Security Nightmare
      If you ask an average person in the UK what the biggest problem associated with driverless cars is, they’d probably cite the safety issue. Industry experts however, feel that once the technology has been worked out, there will probably be less highway accidents and that driving safety will actually be improved. However, the nightmare of having to deal with the threat which always exists when anything is connected to the Internet, will always be one which is cause for concern.

      Cyber Security Roundup for January 2019

      The first month of 2019 was a relatively slow month for cyber security in comparison with the steady stream of cyber attacks and breaches throughout 2018.  On Saturday 26th January, car services and repair outfit Kwik Fit told customers its IT systems had been taken offline due to malware, which disputed its ability to book in car repairs. Kwik Fit didn't provide any details about the malware, but it is fair to speculate that the malware outbreak was likely caused by a general lack of security patching and anti-virus protection as opposed to anything sophisticated.

      B&Q said it had taken action after a security researcher found and disclosed details of B&Q suspected store thieves online. According to Ctrlbox Information Security, the exposed records included 70,000 offender and incident logs, which included: the first and last names of individuals caught or suspected of stealing goods from stores descriptions of the people involved, their vehicles and other incident-related information the product codes of the goods involved the value of the associated loss.

      Hundreds of German politicians, including Chancellor Angela Merkel, have had personal details stolen and published online at the start of January.  A 20 year suspect was later arrested in connection to this disclosure. Investigators said the suspect had acted alone and had taught himself the skills he needed using online resources, and had no training in computer science. Yet another example of the low entry level for individuals in becoming a successful and sinister hacker.

      Hackers took control of 65,000 Smart TVs around the world, in yet another stunt to support YouTuber PewDiePie. A video message was displayed on the vulnerable TVs which read "Your Chromecast/Smart TV is exposed to the public internet and is exposing sensitive information about you!" It then encourages victims to visit a web address before finishing up with, "you should also subscribe to PewDiePie"
      Hacked Smart TVs: The Dangers of Exposing Smart TVs to the Net

      The PewDiePie hackers said they had discovered a further 100,000 vulnerable devices, while Google said its products were not to blame, but were said to have fixed them anyway. In the previous month two hackers carried out a similar stunt by forcing thousands of printers to print similar messages. There was an interesting video of the negative impact of that stunt on the hackers on the BBC News website - The PewDiePie Hackers: Could hacking printers ruin your life?

      Security company ForeScout said it had found thousands of vulnerable devices using search engines Shodan and Cenys, many of which were located in hospitals and schools. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems were among those that the team could have taken control over after it developed its own proof-of-concept malware.

      Reddit users found they were locked out of their accounts after an apparent credential stuffing attack forced a mass password invoke by Reddit in response. A Reddit admin said "large group of accounts were locked down" due to anomalous activity suggesting unauthorised access."

      Kaspersky reported that 30 million cyber attacks were carried out in the last quarter of 2018, with cyber attacks via web browsers reported as the most common method for spreading malware.

      A new warning was issued by Action Fraud about a convincing TV Licensing scam phishing email attack made the rounds. The email attempts to trick people with subject lines like "correct your licensing information" and "your TV licence expires today" to convince people to open them. TV Licensing warned it never asks for this sort of information over email.

      January saw further political pressure and media coverage about the threat posed to the UK national security by Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, I'll cover all that in a separate blog post.


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      Information Security no longer the Department of “NO”

      The information security function within business has gained the rather unfortunate reputation for being the department of “no”, often viewed as a blocker to IT innovation and business transformation. A department seen as out of touch with genuine business needs, and with the demands of evolving workforce demographic of increasing numbers of numbers Millennials and Centennials. However, new research by IDC\Capgemini reveals that attitudes are changing, and business leaders are increasingly relying on their Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) to create meaningful business impact.


      The study bears out a shift in executive perceptions that information security is indeed important to the business. With the modern CISO evolving from that of a responder, to a driver of change, enabling to build businesses to be secure by design. The survey found CISOs are now involved in 90% of significant business decisions, with 25% of business executives perceive CISOs as proactively enabling digital transformation, which is a key goal for 89% of organisations surveyed by IDC.

      Key findings from the research include: 

      • Information security is a business differentiator – Business executives think the number one reason for information security is competitive advantage and differentiation, followed by business efficiency. Just 15% of business executives think information security is a blocker of innovation, indicating that information security is no longer the ‘department of no’ 
      • CISOs are now boardroom players – 80% of business executives and CISOs think their personal influence has improved in the last three years. CISOs are now involved in 90% of medium or high influence boardroom decisions 
      • CISOs must lead digital transformation efforts – At present, less than 25% of business executives think CISOs proactively enable digital transformation. To stay relevant, CISOs must become business enablers. They need to adopt business mindsets and push digital transformation forward, not react to it. CISOs that fail to adopt a business mindset will be replaced by more forward-thinking players.
      From NO to GO
      CISOs have made great leaps forward
      • Focused on making security operations effective and efficient 
      • Engaged with the rest of the business 
      • Seen as key SMEs to the board 
      • Responding to business requests and enabling change
       

      CISOs now need to pivot to because business leaders
      • Need to be part of the business change ecosystem
      • Must be seen as drivers rather than responders
      • CISO as entrepreneur and innovator

      43% of Cybercrimes Target Small Businesses – Are You Next?

      Cybercrimes cost UK small companies an average of £894 in the year ending February of 2018. Small businesses are an easy target for cybercrooks, so it little surprise that around about 43% of cybercrime is committed against small businesses. According to research conducted by EveryCloud, there is much more at stake than a £900 annual loss, with six out of ten small businesses closing within six months of a data breach.

      Damage to a small company’s reputation can be difficult to repair and recover from following a data breach. Since the GDPR data privacy law came in force in May 2018, companies face significant financial sanctions from regulators if found negligent in safeguarding personal information. Add in the potential for civil suits the potential costs start mounting up fast, which could even turn into a business killer.  Case in point is political consulting and data mining firm Cambridge Analytica, which went under in May 2018 after being implicated with data privacy issues related to its use of personal data held on Facebook. However, most small businesses taken out by cyber attacks don't have the public profile to make the deadly headlines.

      Most big companies have contingency plans and resources to take the hit from a major cyber attack, although major cyber attacks prove highly costly to big business, the vast majority are able to recover and continue trading. Working on a tight budget, small businesses just doesn't the deep pockets of big business. Cyber resilience is not a high priority within most small businesses strategies, as you might image business plans are typically very business growth focused.

      Cyber resilience within small business need not be difficult, but it does involve going beyond installing antivirus. A great starting point is UK National Cyber Security Centre's Cyber Essentials Scheme, a simple but effective approach to help businesses protect themselves from the most common cyber attacks. You’ll also need to pay attention to staff security awareness training in the workplace.

      Every employee must ensure that the company is protected from attacks as much as possible. It’s your responsibility to make sure that everyone understands this and knows what preventative measures to put in place.

      It may cost a few bob, but getting an expert in to check for holes in your cybersecurity is a good place to start. They can check for potential risk areas and also educate you and your staff about security awareness.

      We all know the basics, but how many times do we let convenience trump good common sense? For example, how many times have you used the same password when registering for different sites?

      How strong is the password that you chose? If it’s easy for you to remember, then there’s a good chance that it’s not as secure as you’d like. If you’d like more tips on keeping your information secure, then check out the infographic below.


      The Emergence of Geopolitical Fuelled Cyber Attacks

      A new breed of cyberattack is emerging into the threat landscape, fuelled by geopolitical tension, there has been a rise in stealthy and sophisticated cyber attacks reported within recent industry reports. Carbon Blacks 2019 Global Threat Report, released on Wednesday (23/1/19), concluded global governments experienced an increase in cyberattacks during 2018 stemming from Russia, China and North Korea, while nearly 60% of all attacks involved lateral movement.

      'Lateral Movement' is where an attacker progressively and stealthy moves through a victim's network as to find their targets, which are typically datasets or critical assets. This is an attack of sophistication, requiring skill, resources and persistence, beyond the interest of average criminal hackers, whom go after the lowest hanging fruit for an easier financial return.


      Carbon Black concluded that as 2018 came to a close, China and Russia were responsible for nearly half of all cyberattacks they detected. 

      The US and UK government agencies have publicly articulated their distrust of Chinese tech giant Huawei, which resulted in BT removing Huawei IT kit from their new 5G and existing 4G networks last month. UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said he had "very deep concerns" about Huawei being involved with the new UK mobile network due to security concerns. At end of 2017 the UK National Cyber Security Centre warned government agencies against using Kaspersky's products and services, which followed a ban by the US government. Barclays responded by removing their free offering of Kaspersky anti-virus its customers. The UK and US also blamed North Korea for the devastating WannaCry attacks in 2017.

      Another interesting stat from the Carbon Black Global Threat Report that caught the eye, was 2018 saw an approximate $1.8 billion worth of cryptocurrency-thefts, which underlines the cyber-criminal threat still remains larger than ever within the threat landscape.

      Is AI the Answer to never-ending Cybersecurity Problems?

      Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks, talks about the impact and the benefits of Artificial Intelligence(AI) driven cybersecurity. And how AI adoption is helping organisations to stay ahead in the never-ending game that is cybersecurity.

      Artificial Intelligence (AI) isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. With 20% of the C-suite already using machine learning and 41% of consumers believing that AI will improve their lives, wide scale adoption is imminent across every industry - and cybersecurity is no exception. A lot has changed in the cyber landscape over the past few years and AI is being pushed to the forefront of conversations. It’s becoming more than a buzzword and delivering true business value. Its ability to aid the cybersecurity industry is increasingly being debated; some argue it has the potential to revolutionise cybersecurity, whilst others insist that the drawbacks outweigh the benefits.

      With several issues facing the current cybersecurity landscape such as a disappearing IT perimeter, a widening skills gap, increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks and data breaches continuing to hit headlines, a remedy is needed. The nature of stolen data has also changed - CVV and passport numbers are becoming compromised, so coupled with regulations such as GDPR, organisations are facing a minefield.

      Research shows that 60% think AI has the ability to find attacks before they do damage. But is AI the answer to the never-ending cybersecurity problems facing organisations today?

      The Cost-Benefit Conundrum
      On one hand, AI could provide an extremely large benefit to the overall framework of cybersecurity defences. On the other, the reality that it equally has the potential to be a danger under certain conditions cannot be ignored. Hackers are fast gaining the ability to foil security algorithms by targeting the data AI technology is training on. Inevitably, this could have devastating consequences.

      AI can be deployed by both sides - by the attackers and the defenders. It does have a number of benefits such as the ability to learn and adapt to its current learning environment and the threat landscape. If it was deployed correctly, AI could consistently collect intelligence about new threats, attempted attacks, successful data breaches, blocked or failed attacks and learn from it all, fulfilling its purpose of defending the digital assets of an organisation. By immediately reacting to attempted breaches, mitigating and addressing the threat, cybersecurity could truly reach the next level as the technology would be constantly learning to detect and protect.

      Additionally, AI technology has the ability to pick up abnormalities within an organisation’s network and flag it quicker than a member of the cybersecurity or IT team could; AI’s ability to understand ‘normal’ behaviour would allow it to bring attention to potentially malicious behaviour of suspicious or abnormal user or device activity.

      As with most new technologies, for each positive there is an equal negative. AI could be configured by hackers to learn the specific defences and tools that it runs up against which would give way to larger and more successful data breaches. Viruses could be created to host this type of AI, producing more malware that can bypass even more advanced security implementations. This approach would likely be favoured by hackers as they don’t even need to tamper with the data itself - they could work out the features of the code a model is using and mirror it with their own. In this particular care, the tables would be turned and organisations could find themselves in sticky situations if they can’t keep up with hackers.

      Organisations must be wary that they don’t adopt AI technology in cybersecurity ‘just because.’ As attack surfaces expand and hackers become more sophisticated, cybersecurity strategies must evolve to keep up. AI contributes to this expanding attack surface so when it comes down to deployment, the benefits must be weighed up against the potential negatives. A robust, defence-in-depth Information Assurance strategy is still needed to form the basis of any defence strategy to keep data safe.



      Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks

      The Biggest Data Breaches of 2018

      Online security label manufacturer Seareach.plc.uk who specialise in asset labels and asset tracking, has collated some of the biggest data breaches of 2018.



      February

      • 150 million MyFitnessPal app users had their details leaked in a data breach including usernames, email addresses and passwords.
      March
      • Orbitz had 880,000 customers payment card details, stolen by a hacker, thanks to a security vulnerability in the travel site's legacy booking system.
      • Fifa More than 3.4 terabytes of data and 70 million documents from FIFA, containing numerous allegations of corruption, was leaked to German magazine Der Spiegel by the Football Leaks organisation.
      • Cambridge Analytica harvested data (without user permission) from Facebook, more than 80 million people were affected by the data exposure.
      April
      • Macy’s and Bloomingdale's online customers may have had their personal information and credit card details exposed to a third party between April 26 and June 12.
      May
      • Rail Europe, breach saw customer details including credit card numbers, expiration dates, and card verification codes, stolen over three months.
      June
      • Over a million Adidas customers were affected by their data breach. The website was hacked with contact information, usernames, and hashed passwords stolen.
      July
      • Timehop suffered a significant data breach on 7 July 2018 names, email addresses and phone numbers of 21 million users were accessed.
      • Ticketmaster suffered data breach which saw hackers operating a massive credit card skimming operation, via third-party code installed on e-commerce websites.
      • 23,000 Fortnum and Mason customers details were accessed in a data breach, including addresses and contact phone numbers.
      August
      • British Airways data breach hit 380,000 transactions through their website and mobile app. Personal and financial information was stolen.
      September
      • 90 million Facebook user accounts were exposed when hackers stole access tokens that they could then use to take over almost 50 million profiles.
      November
      • Cathay Pacific admitted this month that they had suffered a significant data breach affecting up to 9.4 million passengers, in March.
      • Over 100 million Quora users had their emails, passwords and names taken. The breach occurred after unauthorised access by a malicious third party.
      • Details from over 500 million guest reservations, were stolen from Marriot's Starwood database. Customers were notified in November but authorised accessed could date back to 2014.
      December

      • Twitter was hit by a data breach on its platforms support form. It exposed user data to IP addresses from Saudi Arabia and China.

      Microsoft Windows 7 & Windows 2008 End of Life

      Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 End of Life is fast approaching. 'End of Life' is the point where the operating system will be no longer supported with security patches, unless you (as a business) take out a rather expensive extended warranty agreement with Microsoft.



      As a home user, you should upgrade from Windows 7 without delay, as there are significant performance improvements to be gained with Windows 10. I always recommend installing Windows 10 from scratch onto a blank hard disk drive, rather than using the upgrade option. Ideally install onto a new Solid State Drive (SSD), which improves an operating system's performance massively. SSDs have come down in price in recent months, making a decent memory size SSD an affordable option. Always ensure all your important documents and data are backed up at all times, double check before attempting an operating system installation or upgrade.

      Where as a businesses you have Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 present, it is imperative not to leave your upgrade plan until the last minute, as mass operating systems upgrades within business can be fraught with delays due to technical issues to overcome, and unforeseen business circumstances. Also, Microsoft Windows Server 2016 has a significant virtualisation perform kick over 2008 & 2012 versions. And given the high security risk or cost in purchasing a Microsoft Extended Warranty, there really can be no solid business reason for delaying an upgrade project.

      Microsoft Product     End of Life Date
      Windows 7                      14/01/2020
      Windows Server 2008    14/01/2020
      Office 2010                     13/10/2020
      Windows Server 2012    10/01/2023
      Windows 8/8.1                10/01/2023
      Office 2013                     11/04/2023
      Windows 10                    14/10/2025
      Office 2016                     14/10/2025

      For further Microsoft EOF details see https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/13853/windows-lifecycle-fact-sheet

      Cyber Security Conferences to Attend in 2019

      A list of Cyber and Information Security conferences to consider attending in 2019. Conference are not only great places to learn about the evolving cyber threat landscape and proven security good practices, but to network with industry leading security professionals and likeminded enthusiasts, to share ideas, expand your own knowledge, and even to make good friends.

      JANUARY 2019

      SANS Cyber Threat Intelligence Summit
      Monday 21st & Tuesday 22nd January 2019
      Renaissance Arlington Capital View Hotel, VA, USA
      https://www.sans.org/event/cyber-threat-intelligence-summit-2018


      AppSec California 2019 (OWASP)
      Tuesday 22nd & Wednesday 23rd January 2019
      Annenberg Community Beach House, Santa Monica, USA
      https://2019.appseccalifornia.org/


      PCI London
      Thursday 24th January 2019
      Park Plaza Victoria Hotel, London, UK
      https://akjassociates.com/event/pcilondon

      The Future of Cyber Security Manchester
      Thursday 24th January 2019
      Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, UK
      https://cybermanchester.events/

      BSides Leeds
      Friday 25th January 2019
      Cloth Hall Court, Leeds, UK
      FEBRUARY 2019
      Cyber Security for Industrial Control Systems

      Thursday 7th & Friday 8th February 2019
      Savoy Place, London, UK
      https://events.theiet.org/cyber-ics/index.cfm

      NOORD InfoSec Dialogue UK
      Tuesday 26th & Wednesday 27th February 2019
      The Bull-Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, UK

      MARCH 2019
      RSA Conference
      Monday 4th to Friday 8th March 2019
      At Moscone Center, San Francisco, USA
      https://www.rsaconference.com/events/us19

      17th Annual e-Crime & Cybersecurity Congress
      Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th March 2019
      Park Plaza Victoria

      Security & Counter Terror Expo
      Tuesday 5th & Wednesday 6th March 2019
      Olympia, London, UK
      https://www.counterterrorexpo.com/


      ISF UK Spring Conference
      Wednesday 6th & Thursday 7th March 2019
      Regent Park, London, UK
      https://www.securityforum.org/events/chapter-meetings/uk-spring-conference-london/


      BSidesSF
      Sunday 3rd and Monday 4th March 2019
      City View at Metreon, San Francisco, USA
      https://bsidessf.org/

      Cloud and Cyber Security Expo
      Tuesday 12th to Wednesday 13 March 2019
      At ExCel, London, UK
      https://www.cloudsecurityexpo.com/

      APRIL 2019

      (ISC)2 Secure Summit EMEA
      Monday 15th & Tuesday 16th April 2019
      World Forum, The Hague, Netherlands
      https://web.cvent.com/event/df893e22-97be-4b33-8d9e-63dadf28e58c/summary

      Cyber Security Manchester
      Wednesday 3rd & Thursday 4th April 2019
      Manchester Central, Manchester, UK
      https://cybermanchester.events/

      BSides Scotland 2019
      Tuesday 23rd April 2019
      Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh, UK
      https://www.contextis.com/en/events/bsides-scotland-2019


      CyberUK 2019
      Wednesday 24th & Thursday 25th April 2019
      Scottish Event Campus, Glasgow, UK
      https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/information/cyberuk-2019

      Cyber Security & Cloud Expo Global 2019
      Thursday 25th and Friday 29th April 2019
      Olympia, London, UK
      https://www.cybersecuritycloudexpo.com/global/


      JUNE 2019
      Infosecurity Europe 2019
      Tuesday 4th to Thursday 6th June 2019
      Where Olympia, London, UK
      https://www.infosecurityeurope.com/

      BSides London

      Thursday 6th June 2019
      ILEC Conference Centre, London, UK
      https://www.securitybsides.org.uk/

      Blockchain International Show
      Thursday 6th and Friday 7th June 2019
      ExCel Exhibition & Conference Centre, London, UK
      https://bisshow.com/

      Hack in Paris 2019
      Sunday 16th to Friday 20th June 2019
      Maison de la Chimie, Paris, France
      https://hackinparis.com/

      UK CISO Executive Summit
      Wednesday 19th June 2019
      Hilton Park Lane, London, UK
      https://www.evanta.com/ciso/summits/uk#overview

      Cyber Security & Cloud Expo Europe 2019
      Thursday 19th and Friday 20th June 2019
      RIA, Amsterdam, Netherlands
      https://cybersecuritycloudexpo.com/europe/

      Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit
      Monday 17th to Thursday 20th June 2019
      National Harbor, MD, USA
      https://www.gartner.com/en/conferences/na/security-risk-management-us

      European Maritime Cyber Risk Management Summit
      Tuesday 25th June 2019
      Norton Rose Fulbright, London, UK


      AUGUST 2019
      Black Hat USA
      Saturday 3rd to Thursday 8th August 2019
      Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas, NV, USA
      https://www.blackhat.com/upcoming.html

      DEF CON 27

      Thursday 8th to Sunday 11th August 2019
      Paris, Ballys & Planet Hollywood, Las Vegas, NV, USA
      https://www.defcon.org/


      SEPTEMBER 2019
      44Con
      Wednesday 11th to Friday 13th September 2019
      ILEC Conference Centre, London, UK
      https://44con.com/

      2019 PCI SSC North America Community Meeting
      Tuesday 17th to Thursday 19th September 2019
      Vancouver, BC, Canada
      https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/about_us/events

      OCTOBER 2019

      Hacker Halted
      Thursday 10th & Friday 11th October 2019
      Atlanta, Georgia, USA
      https://www.hackerhalted.com/

      BruCON
      Thursday 10th & Friday 11th October 2019
      Aula, Gent, Belgium
      https://www.brucon.org/2019/

      EuroCACS/CSX (ISACA) 2019

      Wednesday 16th to Friday 19th October 2019
      Palexpo Convention Centre, Geneva, Switzerland
      https://conferences.isaca.org/euro-cacs-csx-2019

      6th Annual Industrial Control Cyber Security Europe Conference
      Tuesday 29th and Wednesday 30th October 2019
      Copthorne Tara, Kensington, London, UK
      https://www.cybersenate.com/new-events/2018/11/13/6th-annual-industrial-control-cyber-security-europe-conference

      2019 PCI SSC Europe Community Meeting

      Tuesday 22nd to Thursday 24th October 2019
      Dublin, Ireland
      https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/about_us/events

      ISF 30th Annual World Congress
      Saturday 26th to Tuesday 29th October 2019
      Convention Centre Dublin, Dublin, Ireland



      NOVEMBER 2019
      Cyber Security & Could Expo North America 2019
      Wednesday 13th and Thursday 14th November 2019
      Santa Clara Convention Centre, Silicon Valley, USA
      https://www.cybersecuritycloudexpo.com/northamerica/

      DevSecCon London 
      Thursday 14th & Friday 15th November 2019
      CodeNode, London, UK


      Cyber Security Summit 2019
      Wednesday 20th November 2019
      QEII Centre, London, UK
      https://cybersecuritysummit.co.uk/

      2019 PCI SSC Asia-Pacific Community Meeting 

      Wednesday 20th and Thursday 21st November 2019
      Melbourne, Australia
      https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/about_us/events

      DeepSec
      Thursday 20th to Saturday 30th November 2019
      The Imperial Riding School Vienna, Austria
      https://deepsec.net/

      Post in the comments about any cyber & information security themed conferences or events you recommend.

      What does Cybersecurity have in store for 2019?

      A guest article authored by Tom Kellermann, Chief Cybersecurity Officer, Carbon Black

      In every intelligence industry there’s often a central aim: predicting the future. We collect and analyse, dissect and interpret, looking for that essential nugget that will give us the edge over our adversaries by indicating what they’ll do next. While this activity goes on 24/7/365, the end of the year encourages us to go public with forecasts to help navigate the choppy waters on the horizon. This year, because all good intelligence involves collaboration, I’ve combined my thoughts with those of our threat analysts and security strategists to give some insight into the TTPs and sectors likely to be top of the list for cyberattackers in 2019.

      1. Destructive attacks and nation-state activity continue to ramp up
        Geo-political tension remained high throughout 2018, bringing with it an associated uplift in cyber insurgency. The US trade war with China is undoubtedly a factor behind the recent resurgence in Chinese cyber espionage and this is set to continue. As well as espionage targeted at infiltration and data theft, our intelligence detected an escalation of attacks where the primary objective was destruction. Our most recent Quarterly Incident Response Threat Report (QIRTR) depicted a wide-spread adoption of C2 on sleep cycles and a high prevalence of attack victims experiencing island hopping and counter incident response.

        In 2019, I’m predicting we’ll see more instances of island hopping, particularly via public cloud infrastructure. We’ll also continue to see a wave of destructive attacks as geopolitical tension continues to manifest itself in cyberspace.

        2. Counter-detection gets more sophisticated
        In 2019, we’ll continue to see attackers attempt to counter detection in the form of Vapor worms – fileless attacks that display worm characteristics and propagate through networks - and IoT worms. As attackers become more sophisticated in their methods, defenders will need to get more adept at spotting evidence of incursions through proactive threat hunting and analysis.

        3. Breach to extortion will become common
          Paul Drapeau, Enterprise Architect in our Threat Analysis Unit, believes our habit of putting our private lives online in the hands of third parties will come back to haunt us in 2019. He told me:

          “Attackers have been actively using ransomware to make a quick buck by locking systems and encrypting files, but this activity could move from compromise of systems to compromise of personal lives. Breaches of social media platforms present a wealth of data to be mined by bad actors. This data could be used to correlate activities between people to find illegal, scandalous or compromising behaviour and then leveraged for traditional blackmail at scale. “Pay up or your spouse/employer gets copies of these direct messages,” an example note might read. We can fight ransomware on our own networks with anti-malware tools or backups, but we depend on giant companies to protect our more personal details.”

          The breach doesn’t even have to be real to result in extortion attempts, as was seen in 2018 with the mass email scam purporting to have compromising video and passwords of the victims. Imagine an attacker building on data from a breach and fabricating message contents and then demanding “ransom” be paid. This type of attack definitely takes more work to pull off, it’s more targeted and difficult, but the payoff could be there. Victims may be willing to pay more money and pay up more readily when it is their real lives and reputations at stake vs. their digital files.

          4. Supply-chain attacks in healthcare
          When it comes to the sectors facing the highest risk, our Security Strategist Stacia Tympanick expects to see a lot more supply chain attacks occur within the Healthcare industry. Healthcare is a tough attack surface to protect and could be a tempting target for nation-state actors bent on disrupting critical national infrastructure (CNI).

          There is so much focus on just making sure that devices are discovered and protected on networks, that managing medical devices on top of this opens up a large attack surface. The trend toward remotely managing patient conditions via IoT devices increases that surface still further – this vector could be weaponised by bad actors.

          Healthcare is also starting to move to the cloud as part of UK government’s ‘Cloud-first’ policy, so cloud providers should be evaluated under a stern eye to ensure that proper and secure procedures/processes are in place to protect patient data.

          5. Steganography makes a comeback
            I always like to make at least one semi-bold prediction each year, and this year I’m saying that steganography makes a comeback. Steganographyis the technique of hiding secret information within innocuous images or documents and it’s an ancient practice – think Da Vinci hiding codes in the Mona Lisa. Examples of steganography are just as hard to detect in the cyber world, with code being masked in legitimate files designed to make it past scanners and firewalls. We could see steganography being used in combination with other attack vectors to create persistence and control mechanisms for malware that’s already running on a compromised network.

            Whatever 2019 holds, here at Carbon Black we’ll be working 24/7 to collect, analyse and interpret the intel that will keep us a step ahead of our adversaries. Wishing you all a happy and cybersafe New Year!

            Tom Kellermann, Chief Cybersecurity Officer, Carbon Black

            Cyber Security Roundup for December 2018

            The final Cyber Security Roundup of 2018 concludes reports of major data breaches, serious software vulnerabilities and evolving cyber threats, so pretty much like the previous 11 months of the year.

            5.3 millions users of "make your own avatar" app Boomoji had their accounts compromised, after the company reportedly didn't secure their internet connected databases properly. "Question and Answer" website Quora also announced the compromise of 100 million of its user accounts following a hack.


            A large data breach reported in Brazil is of interest, a massive 120 million Brazilian citizens personal records were compromised due to a poorly secured Amazon S3 bucket. This is not the first mass data breach caused by an insecure S3 bucket we've seen in 2018, the lesson to be learnt in the UK, is to never assume or take cloud security for granted, its essential practice to test and audit cloud services regularly.

            Amongst the amazing and intriguing space exploration successes reported by NASA in December, the space agency announced its employee's personal data may had been compromised. Lets hope poor security doesn't jeopardise the great and highly expensive work NASA are undertaking.  
            NASA InSight Lander arrives on Mars 

            It wouldn't be normal for Facebook not to be in the headlines for poor privacy, this time Facebook announced a Photo API bug which exposed 6.8 million user images

            Away from the political circus that is Brexit, the European Parliament put into a law a new Cybersecurity Act. Because of the Brexit making all the headlines, this new law may have gone under the radar, but it certainly worth keeping an eye on, even after UK leaves the EU. The EU Parliament has agreed to increase the budget for the ENISA (Network & InfoSec) agency, which will be rebranded as the "EU Agency for Cybersecurity". The Cybersecurity Act will establish an EU wide framework for cyber-security certifications for online services and customer devices to be used within the European Economic Area, and will include IoT devices and critical infrastructure technology. Knowing the EU's love of regulations, I suspect these new best practice framework and associated accreditations to be turned into regulations further down the line, which would impact any tech business operating in European Union.

            The UK Parliament enacted the "The Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act", which also went under the radar due to all the Brexit political noise. The act requires the appointment of a data guardian within England and Wales. The data guardian will publish guidance on the processing of health and adult social care data for use by public bodies providing health or social care services, and produce an annual report.

            Chinese telecoms giant Huawei had plenty of negative media coverage throughout December, with UK government pressuring BT into not using Huawei kit within BT's new 5G network, due to a perceived threat to UK's future critical national infrastructure posed by the Chinese stated-backed tech giant.  The UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said he had "very deep concerns" about Huawei being involved in new UK mobile network.
            Security company Insinia cause controversy after it took over the Twitter accounts by Eamon Holmes, Louis Theroux and several others celebs. Insinia said it had managed the account takeover by analysing the way Twitter handles messages posted by phone, to inject messages onto the targeted accounts by analysing the way the social network interacted with smartphones when messages are sent. However, Insinia were accused of being unethical and breaking the UK Computer Misuse Act in some quarters.

            Unsecured internet connected printers are being hacked again, this time they were used to sent print out messages of support for Swedish YouTube star PewDiePie. A hacker named TheHackerGiraffe was said to have targeted up 50,000 printers after using Shodan to search for open printer ports online, the scan was said to have found 800,000 vulnerable printers.

            An Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) report warned UK banks about their over-reliance on third-party security providers. The FCA said companies "generally lacked board members with strong familiarity or specific technical cyber-expertise. External expertise may be helpful but may also, if overly relied on, undermine the effectiveness of the ‘three lines of defence’ model in identifying and managing cyber-risks in a timely way. The report also warned about supply-chain security, especially the role that firms play in other organisations’ supply chains.

            NEWS

            AWARENESS, EDUCATION AND THREAT INTELLIGENCE
            REPORTS

            Cyber Security Predictions for 2019

            A guest article authored by Jim Ducharme, Vice President of Engineering and Product Management at RSA

            1. Prepare for IOT, the “Identity of Things”
            From personal assistants, to wearables, smartphones, tablets and more, there is no shortage of connected devices. The explosion of IOT has finally reached a tipping point where the conversation of identity will start to take on a whole new meaning. The billions of new digital identities being created don’t come without risk – including new privacy and cybersecurity vulnerabilities. With businesses and consumers all in on IOT, how do we protect and securely manage the “identity” of the things? 

            2. Biometrics vs. the Four-Digit Pin
            Biometrics are under a lot of pressure these days to be the silver bullet of authentication. So how could a simple 4-digit pin, which has at most 10,000 possible combinations, give biometrics like FaceID with a 1 in 50 million entropy a run for its money? The industry will come to realize when 4-digit pins are combined with AI and machine learning, the four-digit pin, similar to what has been used for decades to protect access to our bank accounts, can provide a very high level of security. The ultimate goal for identity and access management is not to find the unbreakable or “unhackable” code for authentication, but rather, to layer security to create a much stronger identity assurance posture. AI and machine learning will be a game changer, allowing for intelligence-driven authentication that will open up additional options of security layers for organizations.  

            3. Death of the Password?
            We have long seen predictions that passwords are in their final days. But it’s time to come to grips that passwords will be here for a long time. But perhaps there is still hope that while we may be living with passwords for generations to come, they may be a lot less scary than the monster we have created. It’s time to reverse the trend of how complex passwords have become (MyKitsH8Me!) and how hard they are to manage (having to change them every 60 days) in an attempt to improve password strength. We can uncomplicate the password and unburden it from having the ultimate responsibility of security. A much more simple password coupled with additional layers of risk-based authentication, especially those factors invisible to the user like behavioral, location and device context, and even transparent biometrics can help businesses better secure access to critical resources.

            4. A New Generation of Risk-based Authentication
            With a seemingly endless stream of high-profile data breaches and malicious cyberattacks, the need to ramp up security and manage identities is evident. 2019 will see the beginning of a new generation of risk-based authentication, powered by machine learning and user behavior analytics. Organizations will start to uncover their own unique context and identity insights to gain a more comprehensive view of user identities including locations, behavior patterns, frequency of use and more. This new generation of risk-based authentication will allow organizations to reduce the friction on end users when accessing applications and information while strengthening the assurance that the user is who they claim to be.

            Jim Ducharme, Vice President of Engineering and Product Management at RSA

              All I want for Christmas: A CISO’s Wishlist!

              As Christmas fast approaches, CISOs and cyber security experts around the world are busy putting plans in place for 2019 and reflecting on what could have been done differently this year. The high-profile data breaches have been no secret - from British Airways to Dixons Carphone to Ticketmaster - and the introduction of GDPR in May 2018 sent many IT professionals into a frenzy to ensure practices and procedures were in place to become compliant with the new regulation.

              What the introduction of GDPR did demonstrate was that organisations should no longer focus on security strategies, which protect the organisation’s network, but instead focus on Information Assurance (IA) which protects an organisation’s data. After all - if an organisation’s data is breached, not only will it face huge fallouts of reputational damage, hits to the organisation’s bottom line and future prospecting difficulties, but it will also be held accountable to regulatory fines - up to as much as €20 million, or 4% annual global turnover under GDPR. Stolen or compromised data is, therefore, an enormous risk to an organisation.

              So, with the festivities upon us and many longing to see gifts under the tree, CISOs may be thinking about what they want for Christmas this year to make sure their organisation is kept secure into the new year and beyond. Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks, outlines three things that should be at the top of the list. 

              1. Backing from the Board
              Every CISO wants buy-in from the Board; and there’s no escaping from the fact that cyber security must become a Board-level priority. However, whilst the correct security mindset must start at the top, in reality it also needs to be embedded across all practices within an organisation; extending beyond the security team to legal, finance and even marketing. The responsibility of securing the entirety of the organisation’s data sits with the CISO, but the catastrophic risks of a cybersecurity failure means that it must be given consideration by the entire Board and become a top priority in meeting business objectives. Quite simply, a Board that acknowledges the importance of having a robust, innovative and comprehensive strategy in place is a CISO’s dream come true.

              2. A Simple Approach
              A complicated security strategy is the last thing any CISO wants to manage. The industry has over-complicated network security for too long and has fundamentally failed. As organisations have layered technology on top of technology, not only has the technology stack itself become complex, but the amount of resources and operational overhead needed to manage it has contributed to mounting costs. A much more simple approach is needed, which involves starting with a security overlay with will cover the networks, independent of the infrastructure, rather than taking the narrow approach of building the strategy around the infrastructure. From a data security perspective, the network must become irrelevant, and with this flows a natural simplicity in approach.

              3. A Future-Proof Solution
              The cyber landscape is constantly evolving; with new threats introduced and technology appearing that just adds to the sophisticated tools that hackers have at their disposal. What a CISO longs for is a solution that keeps the organisation’s data secure, irrespective of new users or applications added, and regardless of location or device. By adopting a software-defined approach to data security, which centrally enforces capabilities such as software-defined application access control, data-in-motion privacy, cryptographic segmentation and a software-defined perimeter, CISOs can ensure that data is protected in its entirety on its journey across whatever network it goes across while hackers are restricted from moving laterally across the network once a breach has occurred. Furthermore, the solution can protect an organisation’s data not only in its present state, but into the future. By enforcing a solution that is software-defined, a CISO can centrally orchestrate the security policy without impacting network performance, and changes can be made to the policy without pausing the protection in place. 

              Three Simple Wishes
              High-profile data breaches won’t go away any time soon, so it is the organisations that have the correct mindset, with Board-level buy-in and a unified approach to securing data that will see the long-term advantages. Complicated, static and siloed approaches to securing an organisation’s data should be a thing of the past, so the good news is that, in reality, everything on a CISOs Christmas wish list is attainable (although not able to be wrapped), and should become a reality in the new year.

              Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks

              Why other Hotel Chains could Fall Victim to a ‘Marriott-style’ Data Breach

              A guest article authored by Bernard Parsons, CEO, Becrypt

              Whilst I am sure more details behind the Marriott data breach will slowly come to light over the coming months, there is already plenty to reflect on given the initial disclosures and accompanying hypotheses.

              With the prospects of regulatory fines and lawsuits looming, assimilating the sheer magnitude of the numbers involved is naturally alarming. Up to 500 million records containing personal and potentially financial information is quite staggering. In the eyes of the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), this is deemed a ‘Mega Breach’, even though it falls short of the Yahoo data breach. But equally concerning are the various timeframes reported.

              Marriott said the breach involved unauthorised access to a database containing Starwood properties guest information, on or before 10th September 2018. Its ongoing investigation suggests the perpetrators had been inside the company’s networks since 2014.

              Starwood disclosed its own breach in November 2015 that stretched back to at least November 2014. The intrusion was said to involve malicious software installed on cash registers and other payment systems, which were not part of its guest reservations or membership systems.

              The extent of Marriott’s regulatory liabilities will be determined by a number of factors not yet fully in the public domain. For GDPR this will include the date at which the ICO was informed, the processes Marriott has undertaken since discovery, and the extent to which it has followed ‘best practice’ prior to, during and after breach discovery. Despite the magnitude and nature of breach, it is not impossible to imagine that Marriott might have followed best practice, albeit such a term is not currently well-defined, but it is fairly easy to imagine that their processes and controls reflect common practice.

              A quick internet search reveals just how commonplace and seemingly inevitable the industry’s breaches are. In December 2016, a pattern of fraudulent transactions on credit cards were reportedly linked to use at InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) properties. IHG stated that the intrusion resulted from malware installed at point-of-sale systems at restaurants and bars of 12 properties in 2016, and later in April 2017, acknowledging that cash registers at more than 1,000 of its properties were compromised.

              According to KrebsOnSecurity other reported card breaches include Hyatt Hotels (October 2017), the Trump Hotel (July 2017), Kimpton Hotels (September 2016) Mandarin Oriental properties (2015), and Hilton Hotel properties (2015).

              Therefore perhaps, the most important lessons to be learnt in response to such breaches are those that seek to understand the factors that make data breaches all but inevitable today. Whilst it is Marriott in the news this week, the challenges we collectively face are systemic and it could very easily be another hotel chain next week.

              Reflecting on the role of payment (EPOS) systems and cash registers within leisure industry breaches is illustrative of the challenge. Paste the phrase ‘EPOS software’ into your favourite search engine, and see how prominent, or indeed absent, the notion of security is. Is it any wonder that organisations often unwittingly connect devices with common and often unmanaged vulnerabilities to systems that may at the same time be used to process sensitive data? Many EPOS systems effectively run general purpose operating systems, but are typically subject to less controls and monitoring than conventional IT systems.

              So Why is This?
              Often the organisation can’t justify having a full blown operating system and sophisticated defence tools on these systems, especially when they have a large number of them deployed out in the field, accessing bespoke or online applications. Often they are in widely geographically dispersed locations which means there are significant costs to go out and update, maintain, manage and fix them.

              Likewise, organisations don’t always have the local IT resource in many of these locations to maintain the equipment and its security themselves.

              Whilst a light is currently being shone on Marriott, perhaps our concerns should be far broader. If the issues are systemic, we need to think about how better security is built into the systems and supply chains we use by default, rather than expecting hotels or similar organisations in other industries to be sufficiently expert. Is it the hotel, as the end user that should be in the headlines, or how standards, expectations and regulations apply to the ecosystem that surrounds the leisure and other industries? Or should the focus be on how this needs to be improved in order to allow businesses to focus on what they do best, without being quite such easy prey?


              CEO and co-founder of Becrypt

              Cyber Security Roundup for November 2018

              One of the largest data breaches in history was announced by Marriott Hotels at the end of November. A hack was said to have compromised up to a mind-blowing "half a Billion" hotel guests' personal information over a four year period.  See my post, Marriott Hotels 4 Year Hack Impacts Half a Billion Guests for the full details. The Radisson Hotel Group also disclosed its Rewards programme suffer a data compromise. Radisson said hackers had gained access to a database holding member's name, address, email address, and in some cases, company name, phone number, and Radisson Rewards member number.

              Vision Direct reported a website compromise, which impacted users of their website between 3rd and 8th November, some 16,300 people were said to be at risk  A fake Google Analytics script was placed within its website code by hackers. 

              Eurostar customers were notified by email to reset their passwords following presumably successful automated login attempts to Eurostar accounts with stolen credentials obtained by an unknown method.

              Two of the TalkTalk hackers were sentenced to a grand total of 20 months for their involvement in the infamous 2015 blackmail hack, which was said to have cost TalkTalk £77 million. There may have been up to 10 other attackers involved according to the court transcripts when hackers attempted to blackmail TalkTalk’s then CEO Dido Harding into paying a ransom in Bitcoin to cover up the breach. Has the enterprise, and judiciary, learned anything from TalkTalk hack?

              Uber was fined £385,000 by the UK Information Commissioner's Office, after hackers stole 2.7 million UK customers in October and November 2016. Uber attempted to cover up the breach by paying the hackers $100,000 (£78,400) to destroy the stolen customer data. Meanwhile stateside,
               Uber paid $148m to settle federal charges. 

              HSBC announced it had suffered a customer data breach in between 4th and 14th of October 2018 in a suspected "credential stuffing" attack. HSBC didn't state how many customers were impacted but are known to have 38 million customers worldwide. HSBC advised their customers to regularly change and use strong passwords and to monitor their accounts for unauthorised activity, sage good practice online banking advice, but I am sure their customers will want to know what has happened.

              Facebook is still making the wrong kind of privacy headlines, this time it was reported that Facebook member's private message data was found for sale online, with one instance involving 257,256 stolen profiles and including 81,208 private messages. The report appears to suggest malicious browser extensions, not Facebook, may be behind the data breach.

              A report from a UK parliamentary committee warned the UK government is failing to deliver on protecting the UK's critical national infrastructure (CNI) from cyber attacks. "The threat to critical infrastructure, including the power grid, is growing" the committee reported, with some states -"especially Russia" - starting to explore ways of disrupting CNI. An advisory notice also warned that UK companies connected to CNI were being targeted by cyber attackers believed to be in eastern Europe. APT28 (Russian based FancyBear) has added the "Cannon" Downloader Tool to their arsenal, according to researchers.

              Amazon's showcase Black Friday sale was hit by data breach days before it started. The online retail giant said it emailed affected customers, but refused to provide any details on the extent or nature of the breach. The customer email said “Our website inadvertently disclosed your email address or name and email address due to a technical error. The issue has been fixed. This is not a result of anything you have done, and there is no need for you to change your password or take any other action.” 

              There was a far more positive security announcement by Amazon about their AWS (cloud) services, with the launch of three new services to simplify and automate AWS security configuration called AWS Control Tower, AWS Security Hub, and AWS Lake Formation McAfee released their 2019 'Cloud Adoption and Risk Report' which highlights the vital importance of configuring cloud services correctly and securely.

              RiskIQ claimed that monitoring for malicious code could have stopped the recent theft of 185,000 British Airways customer records. The Magecart hacker group is believed to be responsible for injecting twenty-two lines of malicious script into the British Airway's payment page, which successfully lifted debit and credit card details, including the CVV code.

              Finally, according to enSilo, European Windows users are said to be targeted by a sophisticated malware called 'DarkGate', which has an arrange of nefarious capabilities, including cryptomining, credential stealing, ransomware, and remote-access takeovers. The DarkGate malware has been found to be distributed via Torrent files disguised as popular entertainment offerings, which includes Campeones and The Walking Dead, so be careful to avoid becoming infected!

              NEWS

              Marriott Hotels 4 Year Hack Impacts Half a Billion Guests!

              A mammoth data breach was disclosed by hotel chain Marriott International today (30 Nov 18), with a massive 500 million customer records said to have been compromised by an "unauthorized party". 
              Image result for marriott
              The world's largest hotel group launched an internal investigation in response to a system security alert on 8th September 2018, and found an attacker had been accessing the hotel chain's "Starwood network" and customer personal data since 2014, copying and encrypting customer records. In addition to the Marriott brand, Starwood includes W Hotels, Sheraton, Le Méridien and Four Points by Sheraton. 

              Image result for starwood
              You are at risk if you have stayed at any of the above hotel brands in the last 4 years

              The Marriott statement said for around 326 million of its guests, the personal information compromised included "some combination" of, name, address, phone number, email address, passport number, date of birth, gender and arrival & departure information. The hotelier also said encrypted payment card data was also copied, and it could not rule out the encryption keys to decrypt cardholder data had not been stolen.

              The hotel giant said it would notify customers affected and offer some a fraud detecting service for a year for free, so I expect they will be making contact with myself soon. In the meantime, Marriott has launched a website for affected customers and a free helpline for concerned UK customers 0808 189 1065.

              The UK ICO said it would be investigating the breach, and warned those who believe they are impacted to be extra vigilant and to follow the advice on the ICO website, and by the National Cyber Security Centre
              . The hotel chain could face huge fines under the GDPR, and possibly a large scale class action lawsuit by their affected guests, which could cost them millions of pounds. 

              What I really would like to know is why the hotel chain had retained such vast numbers of guest records post their stay. Why they held their customer's passport details and whether those encryption keys were stolen or not. And finally, why the unauthorised access went undetected for four years.

              Tom Kellermann, Chief Cybersecurity Officer for Carbon Black, said "It appears there had been unauthorised access to the Starwood network since 2014, demonstrating that attackers will get into an enterprise and attempt to remain undetected. A recent Carbon Black threat report found that nearly 60% of attacks now involve lateral movement, which means attackers aren’t just going after one component of an organisation - they’re getting in, moving around and seeking more targets as they go."

              The report also found that 50% of today’s attackers now use the victim primarily for island hopping. In these campaigns, attackers first target an organisation's affiliates, often smaller companies with immature security postures and this can often be the case during an M&A. This means that data at every point in the supply chain may be at risk, from customers, to partners and potential acquisitions.”

              Jake Olcott, VP of Strategic Partnerships at BitSight, said "Following the breaking news today that Marriott’s Starwood bookings database has been comprised with half a billion people affected, it highlights the importance of organisations undertaking sufficient security posture checks to avoid such compromises. Marriott’s acquisition of Starwood in 2016 allowed it to utilise its Starwood customer database. Therefore, proactive due diligence during this acquisition period would have helped Marriott to identify the potential cybersecurity risks, and the impact of a potential breach".

              “This is yet another example of why it is critical that companies perform cybersecurity analysts during the due diligence period, prior to an acquisition or investment. Traditionally, companies have approached cyber risk in acquisitions by issuing questionnaires to the target company; unfortunately, these methods are time consuming and reflect only a “snapshot in time” view.

              “Understanding the cybersecurity posture of an investment is critical to assessing the value of the investment and considering reputational, financial, and legal harm that could befall the company. After an investment has been made, continuous monitoring is essential.”

              Complexity is the Worst Enemy of Security, Time for a New Approach with Network Security?

              Bruce Schneier summed it up best in 1999 when he said "Complexity is the Worst Enemy of Security" in an essay titled A Plea for Simplicity, correctly predicting the cybersecurity problems we encounter today.

              The IT industry has gone through lots of changes over the past few years, yet when it comes to cybersecurity, the mindset has remained the same. The current thinking around cybersecurity falls into the definition of insanity, with many organisations doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results, and are then shocked when their company is the latest to hit the hacking headlines.

              The current security model is broken and is currently too complex. As Paul German, CEO, Certes Networks, argues, it’s time to strip network security back and focus on the data. 

              What should Organisations Really be Protecting?
              Ultimately, by overcomplicating network security for far too long, the industry has failed - which won’t come as a surprise to many. We’ve all learned the lessons from the high profile data breaches such as Dixon’s Carphone and historical breaches like Ticketmaster or Target; what they succeeded in showing us was that current attempts to secure corporate networks are just not enough. And the reason for this? Quite simply, it’s because organisations are trying to protect something they no longer own. For a long time, security thinking has focused purely on the network, honing in on the insecurity of the network and trying to build up network defences to protect the data that runs over it in order to combat the challenges.

              Yet, this way of thinking still leaves a problem untouched: we don’t always own the networks over which our data runs, so therefore focusing on this aspects is leaving many other doors wide open. The corporate network used to remain in the data centre, but in the digital economy present today, the corporate network spans over corporate locations worldwide, including data centres, private clouds and public clouds. Additionally, this data is not just shared with employees, but to third parties whose devices and policies cannot be easily controlled. Add legacy security measures into the mix which simply weren’t constructed to address the complexity and diversity of today’s corporate network, and it is extremely apparent why this is no longer enough.

              So, what needs to change? First and foremost, the industry needs to take a step in the right direction and put data at the forefront of security strategies.

              The Security Mindset Needs to Change - and It Needs to Change Now
              In an attempt to keep their data and infrastructure secure, organisations have layered technology on top of technology. As a result of this, not only has the technology stack itself become far too complicated but the number of resources, operational overhead and cost needed to manage it have only contributed to the failing security mindset.

              Anyone in the IT industry should be able to acknowledge that something needs to change. The good news is that the change is simple. Organisations need to start with a security overlay that covers the networks, independent of the infrastructure, rather than taking the conventional approach of building the strategy around the infrastructure. The network itself must become irrelevant, which will then encourage a natural simplicity in approach.

              As well as enabling organisations to better secure their data, this approach also has economic and commercial benefits. Taking intelligence out of the network allows organisations to focus it on its core task: managing traffic. In turn, money and resources can be saved and then better invested in a true security model with data protection at its heart.

              A New Era of Cybersecurity
              To begin this mindset change, organisations need to start thinking about security as an overlay on top of existing infrastructure. They also need to introduce a software-defined approach to data security, enabling a centralised orchestration of security policy. This centralised orchestration enforcing capabilities such as software-defined application access control, cryptographic segmentation, data-in-motion privacy and a software-defined perimeter, data is completely protected on its journey across any network, while hackers are restricted from moving laterally across the network once a breach has occurred. Additionally, adopting innovative approaches such as Layer 4 encryption which renders the data itself useless, and therefore worthless to hackers, without impacting the operational visibility of the enterprise network and data flows, will further ensure the protection of the organisation’s network.

              The fact is that the industry has overcomplicated network security for too long. If the industry continues to try the same methods over and over again, without making any changes, then there is no chance of progression. It’s time for organisations to start afresh and adopt a new, simple software-defined security overlay approach. 

              How Safe and Secure are Wearables?

              The ‘wearable technology’ market has been exponentially growing in recent years and is expected to exceed 830 million devices by 2020. One of the key drivers pushing this rapid expansion are fitness trackers, namely wristband tech and smartwatch apps which monitors our daily activity and health. But as we integrate wearables devices seamlessly into our everyday lives, what are the privacy and security risks they pose? How should wearable manufacturers and app developers be protecting consumers?

              245 million wearables will be sold in 2019

              Insurance company Vitality offers customers a heavily discounted Apple Watch to customers in return for their fitness routines and health data, the more activity you do each month, the greater your reward through a monthly discount. While this exchange of information for rewards provides a great incentive for consumers to improve their health, the personal data consumers are sharing in return has a tangible value for the insurance company. However, providing an insurance company with a daily data breakdown of one's health is an unacceptable tradeoff for some, regarding such a practice as an invasion of their privacy. 

              As of May 2018, all EU citizen's privacy rights are legally protected by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). GDPR compliance is required by all companies which process EU citizen data, including those based outside of the European Union. The privacy regulation requires wearable device and app providers to obtain each EU citizen's explicit consent before collecting their personal information, they must also clearly explain what types of personal information they intend to collect, how they intend to use the data, and inform consumers about any other organisation they intend to share their data with. If they don’t, wearable tech firms and app providers should brace themselves for heavy fines by European Information Commissioners.

              For further details about the GDPR requirements and for Wearables Software Development Security Advice, read my IBM developerWorks 3 part guidance "A developer's guide to the GDPR" and my Combating IoT Cyber Threats

              Wearable personal data is also of value to hackers and criminals, for instance, your fitness routine provides a clear picture of the best times to burglarise your home. With personal consumer data potentially at stake, fitness wearable manufacturers should incorporate both default privacy and security standards into the infrastructure of the device, to help ensure personal information remains safeguarded from known and future cyber threats.  ULa global safety science company, has developed testing for cybersecurity threats and offers security verification processes to assist manufacturers in assessing security risks and helping mitigate them before the product even goes to market. If the industry takes these steps, wearable consumers will feel safe and secure as they reap the intended benefits of this new innovation, while the wearables industry will be well positioned to meet the promise of its growth projections.

              Cyber Security Roundup for October 2018

              Aside from Brexit, Cyber Threats and Cyber Attack accusations against Russia are very much on the centre stage of UK government's international political agenda at the moment. The government publically accused Russia's military 'GRU' intelligence service of being behind four high-profile cyber-attacks, and named 12 cyber groups it said were associated with the GRU. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said, "the GRU had waged a campaign of indiscriminate and reckless cyber strikes that served no legitimate national security interest".

              UK Police firmly believe the two men who carried out the Salisbury poisoning in March 2018 worked for the GRU.

              The UK National Cyber Security Centre said it had assessed "with high confidence" that the GRU was "almost certainly responsible" for the cyber-attacks, and also warned UK businesses to be on the alert for indicators of compromise by the Russian APT28 hacking group.  The NCSC said GRU hackers operated under a dozen different names, including Fancy Bear (APT28), had targetted:
              • The systems database of the Montreal-based World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada), using phishing to gain passwords. Athletes' data was later published 
              • The Democratic National Committee in 2016, when emails and chats were obtained and subsequently published online. The US authorities have already linked this to Russia.
              • Ukraine's Kyiv metro and Odessa airport, Russia's central bank, and two privately-owned Russian media outlets - Fontanka.ru and news agency Interfax - in October 2017. They used ransomware to encrypt the contents of a computer and demand payment 
              • An unnamed small UK-based TV station between July and August 2015, when multiple email accounts were accessed and content stolen

              Facebook was fined the maximum amount of £500,000 under pre-GDPR data protection laws by the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) over the Cambridge Analytica Scandal. Facebook could face a new ICO fine after revealing hackers had accessed the contact details of 30 Million users due to a flaw with Facebook profiles. The ICO also revealed a 400% increase in reported Cyber Security Incidents and another report by a legal firm RPC said the average ICO fines had doubled, and to expect higher fines in the future. Heathrow Airport was fined £120,000 by the ICO in October after a staff member lost a USB stick last October containing "sensitive personal data", which was later found by a member of the public.

              Notable Significant ICO Security Related Fines

              Last month's British Airways website hack was worse than originally reported, as they disclosed a second attack which occurred on 5th September 2018, when the payment page had 22 lines of malicious Javascript code injected in an attack widely attributed to Magecart.  Another airline Cathay Pacific also disclosed it had suffered a major data breach that impacted 9.4 million customer's personal data and some credit card data.

              Morrisons has lost a challenge to a High Court ruling which made it liable for a data breach, after an employee, since jailed for 8 years, stole and posted thousands of its employees' details online in 2014.  Morrisons said it would now appeal to the Supreme Court., if that appeal fails, those affected will be able to claim compensation for "upset and distress". 

              Interesting article on Bloomberg on "How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies". However, there was a counter-narrative to the Bloomberg article on Sky News. But didn't stop Ex-Security Minister Admiral Lord West calling the Chinese when he said Chinese IT Kit 'is putting all of us at risk' if used in 5G.  He raises a valid point, given the US Commerce Department said it would restrict the export of software and technology goods from American firms to Chinese chipmaker Fujian Jinhua BT, which uses Huawei to supply parts for its network, told Sky News that it would "apply the same stringent security measures and controls to 5G when we start to roll it out, in line with continued guidance from government". Recently there have been warnings issued by the MoD and NCSC stating a Chinese espionage group known as APT10 are attacking IT suppliers to target military and intelligence information.

              NCSC is seeking feedback on the latest drafts 'knowledge areas' on CyBOK, a Cyber Security body of knowledge which it is supporting along with academics and the general security industry.

              Google are finally pulling the plug on Google+, after user personal data was left exposed. Google and the other three major web browser providers in the world said, in what seems like coordinated announcements, businesses must accept TLS Version 1.0 and 1.1 will no longer support after Q1 2018.

              So its time to move over to the more secure TLS V1.2 or the more secure & efficient TLS V1.3.

              NEWS

              Cyber Security Roundup for September 2018

              September 2018 started with a data breach bang, with British Airways disclosing a significant hack and data loss. 380,000 of the airlines' website and mobile app customers had their debit and credit card details lifted via a maliciously injected script.  The breach even caused BA owners, IAG, to drop in value 4%. And to compound matters, there were several claims made that the BA website wasn't PCI DSS compliant, implying if they were PCI DSS compliant, their customer's personal and payment card information would still be safe.  For further details about this breach see my blog posts; British Airways Customer Data Stolen in Website and Mobile App Hack and British Airways Hack Update: Caused by Injected Script & PCI DSS Non-Compliance is Suspected.

              Facebook continues to make all the wrong kind of privacy headlines after a massive user data breach was confirmed by the social media giant at the end of the month. Facebook said at least 50 million users’ data was at risk after hackers exploited a vulnerability the Facebook code. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he doesn’t know who is behind the cyber attack, however, the FBI are investigating. 

              There was a good measure of embarrassment at the Tory Conference after a flaw in the conference App revealed the personal data of senior UK government cabinet ministers, with Boris Johnson, Michael Gove, Gavin Williamson among those whose their personal information and phones numbers made available.

              There was a number of large data breach fines handed out in September, Tesco Bank was hit by a whopping £16.4 by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), the fine would have been doubled if it weren't for Tesco's good co-operation with the FCA investigation. The FCA said Tesco had security deficiencies which left their bank account holders vulnerable to a cyber attack in November 2016. The attack netted the bad guys, via 34 transactions, a cool £2.26 million. The FCA report said the cyber criminals had exploited weaknesses in the bank's design of its debit card, its financial crime controls and in its financial crime operations team, to carry out the attack over a 48-hour period. 

              Equifax was fined the maximum pre-GDPR law amount of £500K by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) after the US-based credit reference agency failed to protect the personal data of 15 million UK citizens. The ICO ruled Equifax's UK branch had "failed to take appropriate steps" to protect UK citizens' data. It added that "multiple failures" meant personal information had been kept longer than necessary and left vulnerable.

              The ICO also fined Bupa £175K, for not having good enough security to prevent the theft of 547,000 customer records by an employee.  Uber has paid £133m to settle legal claims to customers and drivers, as a result of trying to cover up a huge breach which occurred in 2016 from their regulators. The ride-hailing company admitted to paying off hackers to the tune of $100,000 to delete the data they robbed from Uber's cloud servers. The personal data stolen was from 57 million Uber accounts, also included information about 600,000 driving license numbers. 

              Looks like the MoD and GCHQ are looking to beef up Britan's Cyber Offense capabilities, announcing a plan to recruit a 2,000 strong 'cyber force' to take on the Russian threat. Meanwhile across the pond, the Mirai creators have done a deal to keep themselves out of jail in return for helping the FBI catch cybercrooks, which has echoes of the approach the FBI took with con artist and cheque fraud expert Frank Abagnale, the subject of book and movie "Catch me if you Can".

              Bristol Airport was impacted by a ransomware attack, which took down their arrival and departure screens for a couple of days, and a Scottish Brewery was also hit by ransomware attack through infected CV it had received through an online job advertisement

              Europol warned of 15 ways you could become a Cyber Crime Victim, and there was an excellent article in the New York Times on the Bangladesh’s Central Bank Cyber Theft

              NEWS
              AWARENESS, EDUCATION AND THREAT INTELLIGENCE

              British Airways Hack Update: Caused by Injected Script & PCI DSS Non-Compliance is Suspected

              On Friday (7th September 2018), British Airways disclosed between 21st August 2018 and 5th September 2018, 380,000 BA customer's payment card transactions were compromised by a third party through its website and mobile app. This data included the customer's full name, email address, debit\credit card 16 digit number (PAN), expiry date and card security code i.e. CVV, CV2

              Details of how the hack was orchestrated have now come to light. In a blog post RiskIQ researchers have claimed to have found evidence that a web-based card skimmer script was injected into the BA website, very similar to the approach used by the Magecard group, who are believed to be behind a similar attack against the Ticketmaster website recently. Web-based card skimmer script attacks have been occurring since 2015.

              In this case, once the customer has entered their payment card details and then submits the payment either on a PC or on a touchscreen device, the malicious script executes and captures their payment card data, sending it to a virtual (VPS) server hosted in Romania. The server was hosted on a domain called baways.com and was certified (https) by Comodo to make it appear legit within the website html (code). The server domain was registered 6 days before the breach started, this obviously went undetected by BA's security, perhaps the domain registration could have been picked up by a threat intelligence service.

              Other Researchers have also claimed the BA website wasn't PCI DSS compliant. Marcus Greenwood found files loaded from 7 external domains onto the BA website, and crucially said the BA payment page wasn't isolating the card payment entry within an iframe, which would prevent any third-party scripts (and XSS attacks) from being able to read the payment card form fields. The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is required by all organisations which accept, process, store and/or transmit debit and credit cards.

              Here is the advice from CEO of global cybersecurity specialist SonicWall, Bill Conner:

              "Organizations and government entities carry a responsibility to consumers and civilians alike to guard their most valuable information at all cost. While the British Airways breach may not have been as detrimental as I’m sure its culprits would have liked it to be, it should serve as a wake-up call to CTOs, CIOs and CISOs. The fact is, it is early days, and the true damage done is yet to be seen. Personal information that does not change as easily as a credit card or bank account number drive a high price on the Dark Web. This kind of Personally Identifiable Information is highly sought after by cybercriminals for monetary gain. Companies should be implementing security best practices such as a layered approach to protection, as well as proactively updating any out of date security devices, as a matter of course."

              My view mass credit\debit card data (cardholder data) complete with the security code has always been targeted by cyber crooks as it is very easily sellable on the dark web, as the data only can be used in cardholder-not-present transaction fraud, where credit card holder is not physically present i.e. online, app, phone. The finger can be pointed at lack of PCI DSS compliance by merchants like BA, however, I think it is about time technology was used to improve the security of all cardholder-not-not present transactions, namely Multi-factor authentication (MFA).  While MFA on all cardholder-not-present is not a silver bullet, there is no 100% security, enforced usage across all industries would certainly devalue debit\credit card data considerably.

              British Airways Customer Data Stolen in Website and Mobile App Hack

              In a statement, British Airways stated: "From 22:58 BST August 21 2018 until 21:45 BST September 5 2018 inclusive, the personal and financial details of customers making bookings on ba.com and the airline’s app were compromised." The airline said they will be notifying affected customers, and if anyone has been impacted to contact their bank or credit card providers.
              The Telegraph reported 380,0000 payments were compromised, and that BA customers had experienced payment card fraud as a result before the BA breach disclosure, which strongly suggests unencrypted debit\credit cards were stolen.

              There are no details about the data theft method at the moment, but given the statement said the BA website and BA mobile app was compromised, I think we could be looking at another example of an insecure API being exploited, as per the Air Canada breach and the T-Mobile breach last month.

              We'll see what comes out in the wash over the next few days and weeks, but thanks to the GDPR, at least UK firms are quickly notifying their customers when their personal and financial data has been compromised, even if there is little detail reported about how. Without knowing how the data was compromised, customers cannot be truly assured their private data is safe. It also will be interesting to learn whether the BA systems were compliant with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), required by all organisations that accept, process, store and/or transmit debit and credit cards.

              Update: 
              A spokesperson at BA said "hackers carried out a sophisticated, malicious criminal attack on its website" and impacted BA customers would be compensated. 

              380,000 card payment transactions were confirmed as stolen, specifically:
              • Full Name
              • Email address
              • Payment card number (PAN)
              • Expiration date
              • Card Security Code [CVV] - typically a 3 digit authorisation code written on the back of the debit\credit card
              BA insists it did not store the CVV numbers, these are not allowed to be stored after payment card authorisation under PCI DSS. This suggests the card details may have been intercepted during the payment transaction, perhaps by a maliciously injected or compromised third party website plugin, as opposed to data theft from the database, as often seen with SQL injections attacks against web apps.

              BA have published help and FAQs to anyone that is impacted by this data breach.
              https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/information/incident/data-theft/latest-information

              British Airways is owned by IAG, their share price dropped by more than 4%, which equates to a £500m+ value loss in the company.

              Update on the Attack Method (11 Sept 2018)
              In a blog post RiskIQ researchers have claimed to have found evidence that a web-based card skimmer script was injected into the BA website, very similar to the approach used by the Magecard group, who are believed to be behind a similar attack against the Ticketmaster website recently. Web-based card skimmer script attacks have been occurring since 2015.

              In this case, once the customer entered their payment card details and submitted the payment either on a PC or on a touchscreen device, the malicious script captured their data and sent it to a virtual (VPS) server hosted in Romania. The server was hosted on a domain called baways.com and was certified (https) by Comodo to make it look legit. The server domain was registered 6 days before the breach started, this obviously went undetected by BA's security, perhaps the rogue domain registration could have been picked up by a threat intelligence service.

              Researchers have also claimed the BA website wasn't PCI DSS. They found 7 scripts running on the BA website, but crucially said the BA payment page wasn't isolating the card payments within an iframe, which would prevent third-party scripts (and XSS attacks) from being able to read the payment card form fields.

              Bill Conner, CEO SonicWall said "Organizations and government entities carry a responsibility to consumers and civilians alike to guard their most valuable information at all cost. While the British Airways breach may not have been as detrimental as I’m sure its culprits would have liked it to be, it should serve as a wake-up call to CTOs, CIOs and CISOs. The fact is, it is early days, and the true damage done is yet to be seen. Personal information that does not change as easily as a credit card or bank account number drive a high price on the Dark Web. This kind of Personally Identifiable Information is highly sought after by cybercriminals for monetary gain. Companies should be implementing security best practices such as a layered approach to protection, as well as proactively updating any out of date security devices, as a matter of course."

              Cyber Security Roundup for August 2018

              The largest data breach disclosed this month was by T-Mobile, the telecoms giant said there had been "unauthorised access" to potentially 2 million of their 77 million customer accounts. According to the media, a hacker took advantage of a vulnerability in a T-Mobile API (application programming interface). It was a vulnerable API used by Air Canada mobile App which was also exploited, resulting in the compromise of 20,000 Air Canada customer accounts. Air Canada promptly forced a password change to all of its 77 million customer accounts as a result, however, the airline faced criticism from security experts for advising a weak password strength. Namely, a password length of 8, made up of just characters and digits. Both of these hacks underline the importance of regularly penetration testing Apps and their supporting infrastructure, including their APIs.

              Hackers stole up to 34,000 Butlin guest records, reportedly breaching the UK holiday camp firm through a phishing email. Dixons Carphone upped the estimated number of customer records breached in a hack last year from 1.2 million to 10 million, which includes 5.9 million payment cards. There was no explanation offered by Dixons to why it had taken so long to get a grip on the scale of the data breach, which was reported as occurring in July 2017.

              Huawei continues to face scrutiny over the security of their products after the UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) issued a warning about using the Chinese tech manufacturing giant's devices in a security report. Huawei recently took over from Apple as the world's second largest provider of smartphones. A 16 year old Australian 'Apple fanboy' found himself in court after hacking into Apple's network.

              On the international scene, Microsoft announced it had thwarted Russian data-stealing attacks against US anti-Trump conservative groups, by taking down six domains which hosted mimicked websites, which were likely to be used in future phishing campaigns. The Bank of Spain's website was taken out by a DDoS attack, and a Chinese Hotel Group's 140Gb customer database was found for sale on the dark web. The PGA golf championship was hit by a ransomware, and the FBI arrested three key members of the notorious FIN7 hacking group, the group is said to be responsible for stealing millions of credit card and customer details from businesses across the world.

              On the personal front, the EC-Council confirmed my Computer Hacking Forensic Investigation (CHFI) certification had been renewed until 2021. I dropped into B-Sides Manchester this month, the highlight was a demonstration of a vulnerability found by Secarma researches, namely a PHP flaw which places CMS sites at risk of remote code execution

              There was plenty of critical security patches released by the usual suspects, such as Microsoft, Cisco, and Adobe, the latter firm released several out-of-band patches during August. A critical update was released for Apache Struts (popular web server) and a reminder that Fax machines and all-in-one devices network devices could be used as a way into corporate networks by hackers.

              Finally, there were a couple of interesting cybercrime articles posted on the BBC's news website this month,  Cyber-Attack! Would your firm handle it better than this? and Unpicking the Cyber-Crime Economy

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              Latest on the Currys PC World Data Breach Impacting 10 Million Customers

              Following further investigations, Currys PC World today confirmed 10 million of their customer personal details may have been stolen by hackers, a revised number from the 1.2 million customers and 5.9 million payment cards it advised back in June.

              In June 2018, the company said there was "an attempt to compromise" 5.8 million credit and debit cards but only 105,000 cards without chip-and-pin protection had been leaked after hackers attempted access to company's payment processing systems.

              The hack was said to have occurred nearly a year before it was disclosed, so it either went undetected, which is common where there is inadequate security monitoring in place, or the business knew about the breach but choose not to disclose it to their impacted customers.

              The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) fined the Dixons Carphone £400,000 for a data in 2015 breach, however, Currys PC World stated the incidents were not connected.

              The business stressed it has now improved its security measures including enhanced controls, monitoring, and testing to safeguard customer information, and "trebling their investment in cybersecurity". Unfortunately, no details have been disclosed explaining how the hackers were able to access such large quantities of personal data. The company "security improvement" statement suggests their IT security was rather underfunded and not at a sufficient standard to adequately secure their business operations and customer data.

              The ICO (statement) and the NCSC (statement) both have released statements in June about the breach. So we'll see what the ICO makes of it, but I think the business is likely to be fined again, although not the potentially massive GDPR penalties, as this data breach occurred before the GDPR came into force in May.

              Customer statement by Currys PC World to their customers today

              On June 13, we began to contact a number of our customers as a precaution after we found that some of our security systems had been accessed in the past using sophisticated malware.

              We promptly launched an investigation. Since then we have been putting further security measures in place to safeguard customer information, increased our investment in cyber security and added additional controls. In all of this we have been working intensively with leading cyber security experts.

              Our investigation, which is now nearing completion, has identified that approximately 10 million records containing personal data may have been accessed in 2017. This unauthorised access to data may include personal information such as name, address, phone number, date of birth and email address.

              While there is now evidence that some of this data may have left our systems, these records do not contain payment card or bank account details and we have no confirmed instances of customers falling victim to fraud as a result. We are continuing to keep the relevant authorities updated.

              As a precaution, we are letting our customers know to apologise and advise them of protective steps to take to minimise the risk of fraud. These include:

              If you receive an unsolicited email, letter, text or phone call asking for personal information, never reveal any full passwords, login details or account numbers until you are certain of the identity of the person making the request. Please do not click on any links you do not recognise.


              If you think you have been a victim of fraud you should report it to Action Fraud, the UK’s national fraud and internet crime reporting centre, on 0300 123 2040*.

              We also recommend that people are vigilant against any suspicious activity on their bank accounts and contact their financial provider if they have concerns.
              You can find more information here


              We take the security of your data extremely seriously and have previously announced that we have taken action to close off this access and have no evidence it is continuing. Nevertheless, we felt it was important to let customers know as soon as possible.

              We continue to make improvements and investments to our security systems and we’ve been working round the clock to put this right. We’re extremely sorry about what has happened – we’ve fallen short here. We want to reassure you that we are fully committed to protecting your data so that you can be confident that it is safe with us.

              Cyber Security Roundup for July 2018

              The importance of assuring the security and testing quality of third-party provided applications is more than evident when you consider an NHS reported data breach of 150,000 patient records this month. The NHS said the breach was caused by a coding error in a GP application called SystmOne, developed by UK based 'The Phoenix Partnership' (TTP). The same assurances also applies to internally developed applications, case-in-point was a publically announced flaw with Thomas Cook's booking system discovered by a Norwegian security researcher. The research used to app flaw to access the names and flights details of Thomas Cook passengers and release details on his blog. Thomas Cook said the issue has since been fixed.

              Third-Third party services also need to be security assured, as seen with the Typeform compromise. Typeform is a data collection company, on 27th June, hackers gained unauthorised access to one of its servers and accessed customer data. According to their official notification, Typeform said the hackers may have accessed the data held on a partial backup, and that they had fixed a security vulnerability to prevent reoccurrence. Typeform has not provided any details of the number of records compromised, but one of their customers, Monzo, said on its official blog that is was in the region of 20,000. Interestingly Monzo also declared ending their relationship with Typeform unless it wins their trust back. Travelodge one UK company known to be impacted by the Typeform breach and has warned its impacted customers. Typeform is used to manage Travelodge’s customer surveys and competitions.

              Other companies known to be impacted by the Typeform breach include:

              The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) fined Facebook £500,000, the maximum possible, over the Cambridge Analytica data breach scandal, which impacted some 87 million Facebook users. Fortunately for Facebook, the breach occurred before the General Data Protection Regulation came into force in May, as the new GDPR empowers the ICO with much tougher financial penalties design to bring tech giants to book, let's be honest, £500k is petty cash for the social media giant.
              Facebook-Cambridge Analytica data scandal
              Facebook reveals its data-sharing VIPs
              Cambridge Analytica boss spars with MPs

              A UK government report criticised the security of Huawei products, concluded the government had "only limited assurance" Huawei kit posed no threat toUK national security. I remember being concerned many years ago when I heard BT had ditched US Cisco routers for Huawei routers to save money, not much was said about the national security aspect at the time. The UK gov report was written by the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC), which was set up in 2010 in response to concerns that BT and other UK companies reliance on the Chinese manufacturer's devices, by the way, that body is overseen by GCHQ.

              Banking hacking group "MoneyTaker" has struck again, this time stealing a reported £700,000 from a Russia bank according to Group-IB. The group is thought to be behind several other hacking raids against UK, US, and Russian companies. The gang compromise a router which gave them access to the bank's internal network, from that entry point, they were able to find the specific system used to authorise cash transfers and then set up the bogus transfers to cash out £700K.


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              Cyber Security Roundup for June 2018

              Dixons Carphone said hackers attempted to compromise 5.9 million payment cards and accessed 1.2 million personal data records. The company, which was heavily criticised for poor security and fined £400,000 by the ICO in January after been hacked in 2015, said in a statement the hackers had attempted to gain access to one of the processing systems of Currys PC World and Dixons Travel stores. The statement confirmed 1.2 million personal records had been accessed by the attackers. No details were disclosed explaining how hackers were able to access such large quantities of personal data, just a typical cover statement of "the investigation is still ongoing".  It is likely this incident occurred before the GDPR law kicked in at the end of May, so the company could be spared the new more significant financial penalties and sanctions the GDPR gives the ICO, but it is certainly worth watching the ICO response to a repeat offender which had already received a record ICO fine this year. The ICO (statement) and the NCSC (statement) both have released statements about this breach.

              Ticketmaster reported the data theft of up to 40,000 UK customers, which was caused by security weakness in a customer support app, hosted by Inbenta Technologies, an external third-party supplier to Ticketmaster. Ticketmaster informed affected customers to reset their passwords and has offered (to impacted customers) a free 12-month identity monitoring service with a leading provider. No details were released on how the hackers exploited the app to steal the data, likely to be a malware-based attack. However, there are questions on whether Ticketmaster disclosed and responded to the data breach quick enough, after digital banking company Monzo, claimed the Ticketmaster website showed up as a CPP (Common Point of Purchase) in an above-average number of recent fraud reports. The company noticed 70% of fraudulent transactions with stolen payment cards had used the Ticketmaster site between December 2017 and April 2018. The UK's National Cyber Security Centre said it was monitoring the situation.

              TSB customers were targetted by fraudsters after major issues with their online banking systems was reported. The TSB technical issues were caused by a botched system upgrade rather than hackers. TSB bosses admitted 1,300 UK customers had lost money to cyber crooks during its IT meltdown, all were said to be fully reimbursed by the bank.
              The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) issued Yahoo a £250,000 fine after an investigation into the company's 2014 breach, which is a pre-GDPR fine. Hackers were able to exfiltrate 191 server backup files from the internal Yahoo network. These backups held the personal details of 8.2 million Yahoo users, including names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed password and other security data. The breach only came to light as the company was being acquired by Verizon.

              Facebook woes continue, this time a bug changed the default sharing setting of 14 million Facebook users to "public" between 18th and 22nd May.  Users who may have been affected were said to have been notified on the site’s newsfeed.

              Chinese Hackers were reported as stealing secret US Navy missile plans. It was reported that Chinese Ministry of State Security hackers broke into the systems of a contractor working at the US Naval Undersea Warfare Center, lifting a massive 614GB of secret information, which included the plans for a supersonic anti-ship missile launched from a submarine. The hacks occurred in January and February this year according to a report in the Washington Post.

              Elon Musk (Telsa CEO) claimed an insider sabotaged code and stole confidential company information.  According to CNBC, in an email to staff, Elon wrote I was dismayed to learn this weekend about a Tesla employee who had conducted quite extensive and damaging sabotage to our operations. This included making direct code changes to the Tesla Manufacturing Operating System under false usernames and exporting large amounts of highly sensitive Tesla data to unknown third parties". Telsa has filed a lawsuit accusing a disgruntled former employee of hacking into the systems and passing confidential data to third parties. In the lawsuit, it said the stolen information included photographs and video of the firm's manufacturing systems, and the business had suffered "significant and continuing damages" as a result of the misconduct.

              Elsewhere in the world, FastBooking had 124,000 customer account stolen after hackers took advantage of a web application vulnerability to install malware and exfiltrate data. Atlanta Police Dashcam footage was hit by Ransomware.  And US company HealthEquity had 23,000 customer data stolen after a staff member fell for a phishing email.

              IoT Security
              The Wi-Fi Alliance announced WPA3, the next generation of wireless security, which is more IoT device friendly, user-friendly, and more secure than WPA2, which recently had a security weakness reported (see Krack vulnerability). BSI announced they are developing a new standard for IoT devices and Apps called ISO 23485. A Swann Home Security camera system sent a private video to the wrong user, this was said to have been caused by a factory error.  For Guidance on IoT Security see my guidance, Combating IoT Cyber Threats.

              As always, a busy month for security patching, Microsoft released 50 patches, 11 of which were rated as Critical. Adobe released their monthly fix for Flash Player and a critical patch for a zero-day bug being actively exploited. Cisco released patches to address 34 vulnerabilities, 5 critical, and a critical patch for their Access Control System. Mozilla issued a critical patch for the Firefox web browser.

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              Cyber Security Roundup for May 2018

              I'm sure the release of the GDPR on 25th May hasn't escaped anyone's attention. After years of warnings about the EU parliament's intended tough stance on enforcing the human right to privacy in the digital realm, a real 'game changer' of a global privacy regulation has finally landed, which impacts any organisation which touches EU citizen personal data. 

              The GDPR's potential hefty financial penalties for breaching its requirements is firmly on the radar of directors at large enterprises and small businesses alike, hence the massive barrage of emails we have all have received in recent weeks, on changes to company privacy statements and requesting consent, many of which I noted as not being GDPR compliant as obtaining "explicit consent" from the data subject. So there is a long way to go for many organisations before they become truly GDPR compliant state based on what I've seen so far in my mailbox.

              Cybercriminals have been quick to take advantage of the GDPR privacy emails deluge, using the subject matter in their phishing attacks to cheat access to accounts and con victims.
              On a positive GDPR note, also on 25th May, IBM developerWorks released a three-part guidance series written by myself, aimed at helping Application Developers to develop GDPR compliant applications.

              Developing GDPR Compliant Applications Guidance

              Overshadowed by the GDPR coming in force, was the release of new NHS Data Security and Protection Toolkit, aimed at the NHS and their service providers, and the European NIS Directive (for telecom providers) went under the radar, but they are significant to those working in those industries.

              Always make sure your Broadband Router\Hub does not permit remote administrative access (over the internet) and is always kept up-to-date with the latest security patches, otherwise, it will be at serious risk of being hacked and remotely controlled by cyber-criminals. As evidenced with month, after a DNS flaw in over 800,000 Draytek Routers has allowed hackers to take them over, malware called VPNFilter has infected 500,000 routers, and serious vulnerabilities has been reported in TP-Link EAP controllers.

              IBM made headlines after banning its workers from using USB sticks, which I think is a good and reasonable policy. As quite frankly any modern enterprise, whether large or small, with a decent IT infrastructure and cloud services, staff shouldn't need to use USB devices to move data either internally or externally with third parties, so I see this as a rather smart business and security move to ban all USB devices, as it forces staff to use the more secure and more efficient technology made available.

              As my @securityexpert twitter account crossed the 10,000 follower threshold Twitter advised 300 million users to reset their passwords after internal error. Apparently, the passwords for the Twitter accounts were accidentally stored in a database in their "plain text" value instead of using a hashed value for the password, as per best practice. I always strongly recommend Twitter users to take advantage and use the multi-factor authentication system Twitter provides, which reduces the risk of account hacking.

              Breaches of note in May included a T-Mobile website bug which exposed personal customer data, Coca-Cola said an insider breached 8,000 accounts, and BMW cars were found to have over a dozen security vulnerabilities.

              As always a busy month of new security patch releases, with Microsoft, Adobe, PHP, PGP, Google, Git, and Dell all releasing critical security updates to fix significant security flaws. Click the links for the full details.

              Analysis of DDoS Attacks at Cloudflare, has revealed that while organisations in the UK have certainly upped their spending on DDoS mitigation, cyber-criminals are now responding by switching to Layer 7 based DDoS attacks
              Some interesting articles about the Welsh Cyber Security Revolution and a review of the NHS a year on from the WannaCry outbreak

              Reports of interest this month include the Thales Data Threat Report, which found UK businesses to be the most breached in Europe. The LastPass Psychology of Passwords Report which found 59% of people surveyed used the same passwords across multiple accounts, despite 91% of them knowing that using the same password for multiple accounts is a security risk. The 2017 Cylance Report stated the number of cyber-attacks on industries such as healthcare, manufacturing, professional services, and education rose by about 13.4% between 2016 and 2017.

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              Application Development GDPR Compliance Guidance

              Last week IBM developerWorks released a three-part guidance series I have written to help 
              Application Developers develop GDPR compliant applications.

              Developing GDPR Compliant Applications Guidance

              The GDPR
              The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was created by the European Commission and Council to strengthen and unify Europe's data protection law, replacing the 1995 European Data Protection Directive. Although the GDPR is a European Union (EU) regulation, it applies to any organizations outside of Europe that handle the personal data of EU citizens. This includes the development of applications that are intended to process the personal information of EU citizens. Therefore, organizations that provide web applications, mobile apps, or traditional desktop applications that can indirectly process EU citizen's personal data or allow EU citizens sign in are subject to the GDPR's privacy obligations. Organizations face the prospect of powerful sanctions should applications fail to comply with the GDPR.

              Part 1: A Developer's Guide to the GDPR
              Part 1 summarizes the GDPR and explains how the privacy regulation impacts and applies to developing and supporting applications that are intended to be used by European Union citizens.

              Part 2: Application Privacy by Design
              Part 2 provides guidance for developing applications that are compliant with the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation. 

              Part 3: Minimizing Application Privacy Risk

              Part 3  provides practical application development techniques that can alleviate an application's privacy risk.

              Cyber Security Roundup for April 2018

              The fallout from the Facebook privacy scandal rumbled on throughout April and culminated with the closure of the company at the centre of the scandal, Cambridge Analytica.
              Ikea was forced to shut down its freelance labour marketplace app and website 'TaskRabbit' following a 'security incident'. Ikea advised users of TaskRabbit to change their credentials if they had used them on other sites, suggesting a significant database compromise.

              TSB bosses came under fire after a botch upgraded to their online banking system, which meant the Spanished owned bank had to shut down their online banking facility, preventing usage by over 5 million TSB customers. Cybercriminals were quick to take advantage of TSB's woes.

              Great Western Railway reset the passwords of more than million customer accounts following a breach by hackers, US Sun Trust reported an ex-employee stole 1.5 million bank client records, an NHS website was defaced by hackers, and US Saks, Lord & Taylor had 5 million payment cards stolen after a staff member was successfully phished by a hacker.

              The UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) blacklist China's state-owned firm ZTE, warning UK telecom providers usage of ZTE's equipment could pose a national security risk. Interestingly BT formed a research and development partnership with ZTE in 2011 and had distributed ZTE modems. The NCSC, along with the United States government, released statements accusing Russian of large-scale cyber-campaigns, aimed at compromising vast numbers of the Western-based network devices.

              IBM released the 2018 X-Force Report, a comprehensive report which stated for the second year in a row that the financial services sector was the most targeted by cybercriminals, typically by sophisticated malware i.e. Zeus, TrickBot, Gootkit. NTT Security released their 2018 Global Threat Intelligence Report, which unsurprisingly confirmed that ransomware attacks had increased 350% last year.  

              A concerning report by the EEF said UK manufacturer IT systems are often outdated and highly vulnerable to cyber threats, with nearly half of all UK manufacturers already had been the victim of cybercrime. An Electropages blog questioned whether the boom in public cloud service adoption opens to the door cybercriminals.

              Finally, it was yet another frantic month of security updates, with critical patches released by Microsoft, Adobe, Apple, Intel, Juniper, Cisco, and Drupal.

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              Cyber Security Roundup for March 2018

              In the wake of the global political fallout over the Salisbury nerve agent attack, there are reports of a growing threat of Russian state or Russian state-affiliated hacking groups conducting cyber attack reprisals against UK organisations, government officials have directly warned bosses at electricity, gas and water firms, Whitehall departments and NHS hospitals to prepare for a state-sponsored cyber assault


              Large-scale data breaches were disclosed with Under Armour’s Fitness App MyFitnessPal (1.5 million personal records compromised), Orbitz (880k payment cards at risk), and at a Walmart partner (1.3 million personal records compromised). The latter was caused when an AWS S3 bucket holding a Walmart database was left with open access, which isn't the first time a cloud service misconfiguration has caused a major data breach.

              TalkTalk were warned about their website’s poor security after a hacker known as 'B' disclosed a cross-site scripting vulnerability on the talktalk.co.uk website to Sky News. TalkTalk was given a record £400,000 fine by the Information Commissioner's Office following a major website breach in October 2015, which 157,000 customer details were stolen. And the company were told to "be more diligent and more vigilant” and was fined a further £100,000 after data belonging to 21,000 customers were exposed to "rogue" staff at an Indian call centre.

              GitHub survived the largest ever DDoS attack recorded thanks to Akamai DDoS protection, which peaked at a massive 1.35 terabytes of data per second.

              UK schools were warned they were soft targets for cybercriminals, experts believe many schools are ill-equipped to prevent cyber thefts, with sensitive data such as children’s medical records said to be lucrative on the dark web. There has been a number of security incidents disclosed involving UK schools in recent months.
              Gwent Police are facing scrutiny by the Information Commissioner's Office for not informing 450 people that hackers may have accessed their personal information, after discovering the breach over a year ago.

              A hacker alleged to be behind a gang the ran the Carbanak and Cobalt bank target malware has been arrested. The gang is reported to be responsible for the theft of up to billion euros through bank transfers and from cash machines, from over 100 banks since 2013


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