Daily Archives: October 21, 2020

Addressing cybersecurity risk in industrial IoT and OT

As the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and operational technology (OT) continue to evolve and grow, so too, do the responsibilities of the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). The CISO now needs to mitigate risks from cloud-connected machinery, warehouse systems, and smart devices scattered among hundreds of workstations. Managing those security risks includes the need to ensure safety in manufacturing, oil and gas facilities, public utilities, transportation, civic infrastructure, and more.

Analysts predict that we’ll have roughly 21.5 billion IoT devices connected worldwide in 2025, drastically increasing the surface area for attacks. Because embedded devices often go unpatched, CISO’s need new strategies to mitigate IIoT/OT risks that differ in crucial ways from those found in information technology (IT). The difference needs to be understood by your Board of Directors (BoD) and leadership team. Costly production outages, safety failures with injuries or loss of life, environmental damage leading to liability—all are potentially disastrous scenarios that have moved IIoT and OT to the center of cyber threat management.

An evolving threat landscape

Both IIoT and OT are considered cyber-physical systems (CPS); meaning, they encompass both the digital and physical worlds. This makes any CPS a desirable target for adversaries seeking to cause environmental contamination or operational disruption. As recent history shows, such attacks are already underway. Examples include the TRITON attack—intended to cause a serious safety incident—on a Middle East chemical facility and the Ukrainian electrical-grid attacks. In 2017, ransomware dubbed NotPetya paralyzed the mighty Maersk shipping line and nearly halted close to a fifth of the world’s shipping capacity. It also spread to pharma giant Merck, FedEx, and numerous European firms before boomeranging back to Russia to attack the state oil company, Rosneft.

In 2019, Microsoft observed a Russian state-sponsored attack using IoT smart devices—a VOIP phone, an office printer, and a video decoder—as entry points into corporate networks, from which they attempted to elevate privileges. Attackers have even compromised building access control systems to move into corporate networks using distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks; wherein, a computer system is overwhelmed and crashed with an onslaught of traffic.

The current model

Since the 1990’s, the Purdue Enterprise Reference Architecture (PERA), aka the Purdue Model, has been the standard model for organizing (and segregating) enterprise and industrial control system (ICS) network functions. PERA divides the enterprise into various “Levels,” with each representing a subset of systems. Security controls between each level are typified by a “demilitarized zone” (DMZ) and a firewall.

Conventional approaches restrict downward access to Level 3 from Levels 4, 5 (and the internet). Heading upward, only Layer 2 or 3 can communicate with Layers 4 and 5, and the lowest two Levels (machinery and process) must keep their data and communications within the organization’s OT.

But in our IIoT era, data no longer flows in a hierarchical fashion as prescribed by the Purdue Model. With the rise of edge computing, smart sensors, and controllers (Levels O, 1) now bypass firewalls and communicate directly with the cloud, creating new risks for system exposure.

Modernizing this model with Zero Trust principles at Levels 4 and 5 can help bring an organization’s IIoT/OT into full compliance for the cloud era.

A new strategy

Consequence-driven cyber-informed engineering (CCE) is a new methodology designed by Idaho National Labs (INL) to address the unique risks posed by IIoT/OT. Unlike conventual approaches to cybersecurity, CCE views consequence as the first aspect of risk management and proactively engineers for potential impacts. Based on CCE, there are four steps that your organization—public or private—should prioritize:

  1. Identify your “crown jewel” processes: Concentrate on protecting critical “must-not-fail” functions whose failure could cause safety, operational, or environmental damage.
  2. Map your digital estate: Examine all the digital pathways that could be exploited by adversaries. Identify all of your connected assets—IT, IoT, building management systems (BMS), OT, smart personal devices—and understand who has access to what, including vendors, maintenance people, and remote workers.
  3. Spotlight likely attack paths: Analyze vulnerabilities to determine attack routes leading to your crown jewel processes, including possible social engineering schemes and physical access to your facilities.
  4. Mitigate and protect: Prioritize options that allow you to “engineer out” cyber risks that present the highest consequences. Implement Zero Trust segmentation policies to separate IIoT and OT devices from other networks. Reduce the number of internet-accessible entry points and patch vulnerabilities in likely attack paths.

Making the case in real terms

Your leadership and BoD have a vested interest in seeing a return on investment (ROI) for any new software or hardware. Usually, the type of ROI they want and expect is increased revenue. But returns on security software often can’t be seen in a quarterly statement. That means cybersecurity professionals have to present a solid case. Here are some straightforward benefits to investing in IIoT/OT cybersecurity software that you can take into the boardroom:

  • Prevent safety or environmental costs: Security failures at chemical, mining, oil, transportation, or other industrial facilities can cause consequences more dire than an IT breach. Lives can be lost, and costs incurred from toxic clean-up, legal liability, and brand damage can reach into the hundreds of millions.
  • Minimize downtime: As the NotPetya and LockerGoga attacks demonstrated, downtime incurs real financial losses that affect everyone—from plant personnel all the way up to shareholders.
  • Stop IP theft: Companies in the pharmaceutical industry, energy production, defense, high-tech, and others spend millions on research and development. Losses from having their intellectual property stolen by nation states or competitors can also be measured in the millions.
  • Avoid regulatory fines: Industries such as pharmaceuticals, oil/gas, transportation, and healthcare are heavily regulated. Therefore, they are vulnerable to large fines if a security breach in IIoT/OT causes environmental damage or loss of life.

The way forward

For today’s CISO, securing the digital estate now means being accountable for all digital security—IT, OT, IIoT, BMS, and more. This requires an integrated approach—embracing people, processes, and technology. A good checklist to start with includes:

  • Enable IT and OT teams to embrace their common goal—supporting the organization.
  • Bring your IT security people onsite so they can understand how OT processes function.
  • Show OT personnel how visibility helps the cybersecurity team increase safety and efficiency.
  • Bring OT and IT together to find shared solutions.

With attackers now pivoting across both IT and OT environments, Microsoft developed Azure Defender for IoT to integrate seamlessly with Azure Sentinel and Azure Sphere—making it easy to track threats across your entire enterprise. Azure Defender for IoT utilizes:

  • Automated asset discovery for both new greenfield and legacy unmanaged IoT/OT devices.
  • Vulnerability management to identify IIoT/OT risks, detect unauthorized changes, and prioritize mitigation.
  • IIoT/OT-aware behavioral analytics to detect advanced threats faster and more accurately.
  • Integration with Azure Sentinel and third-party solutions like other SIEMs, ticketing, and CMDBs.

Azure Defender for IoT makes it easier to see and mitigate risks and present those risks to your BoD. Microsoft invests more than USD1 billion annually on cybersecurity research, which is why Azure has more compliance certifications than any other cloud provider.

Plain language and concrete examples go far when making the case for IIoT/OT security software. Your organization should define what it will—and more importantly, will not—tolerate as operational risks. For example: “We tolerate no risk to human life or safety”; “no permanent damage to the ecosystem”; “no downtime that will cost jobs.” Given the potential for damages incurred from downtime, injuries, environmental liability, or tarnishing your brand, an investment in cybersecurity software for IIoT/OT makes both financial and ethical sense.

To learn more about Microsoft Security solutions, visit our website.  Bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity.

The post Addressing cybersecurity risk in industrial IoT and OT appeared first on Microsoft Security.

NICE Webinar: Addressing the Cybersecurity Talent Gap at Scale – Introducing Learning and Employment Records

The PowerPoint slides used during this webinar can be downloaded here. The webinar video will be available here when ready. Speakers: Rick Torres President and CEO National Student Clearinghouse Alex Kaplan Global Leader, Blockchain and AI for Industry Credentials IBM Talent and Transformation Darin R. Hobbs Director of Academic Records & Credentials Western Governors University Frank C. Cicio Jr. CEO and Founder iQ4 Synopsis: We are living in a skills-based economy where employers are seeking ways for learners (employees, job seekers, and students) to provide evidence of their skills or

How to Install Mitre CALDERA and Configure Your SSL Certificate

Carrie & Darin Roberts // If you would like to install the Mitre CALDERA server on your own, the CALDERA GitHub page has installation instructions on their ReadMe here. Detailed steps are provided below for installing CALDERA on Ubuntu and configuring it to use your SSL certification. Clone the Repository git clone https://github.com/mitre/caldera.git --recursive --branch […]

The post How to Install Mitre CALDERA and Configure Your SSL Certificate appeared first on Black Hills Information Security.

Election 2020: Make Sure Your Voice is Heard with These Tips

U.S. Elections

Election 2020: Make Sure Your Voice is Heard with These Tips & Best Practices

Last year, India exercised one of the greatest feats of democracy, trying to enable over 900 million people to vote in their general election. My mom lives in India, and I remember talking with her about their ambitious plans to reach every voter, no matter how remote their location. They sent poll workers deep into the jungle, and across rivers, to reach just a handful of voters. The result: a record turnout at over 67%.

In the United States, we too have an opportunity to fulfill our civic duties, with various options available to us to make sure our votes are heard. While many people choosing to mail in their votes for the very first time, there’s also a lot of confusion around election rules and security, not to mention a flood of misinformation online to be wary of.

Here at McAfee, we want to help you vote with confidence in this critical election. That’s why we’ve put together a number of tools, resources, and best practices to empower voters. Our hope is that every voice can be heard.

Demystifying Mail-In Voting

Let’s start with some questions you may have around mail-in voting, since twice as many people plan to mail in their ballots this year, compared to 2016. Of course, with the COVID-19 pandemic still active, it’s understandable that many people, especially the vulnerable, would prefer to mail their ballot, rather than go to a polling station. I personally got my mail-in ballot and am ready to mail it this week. If you haven’t decided on how to vote, you still have time to decide.

To get accurate information on mail-in voting, go directly to your state and local websites for guidance, including how to fill out your ballot, and when to turn it in. Rules vary state to state, but one thing we do know is that mail-in voting has proven to be a reliable and secure way to have your voice heard.

It’s great to see long lines to vote in some states already. If you are still concerned about election security and online scams, my colleague Judith Bitterli has written a great guide for locating reliable sources and protecting your vote (Key tip: always look for a .gov domain name).

She also has advice for making sure that your mail-in ballot counts.

Safe Election Surfing

When looking online for election resources, be aware that scammers and cybercriminals are always trying to take advantage of trending topics to misdirect users to dangerous websites and links. In fact, the FBI recently warned that bad actors have been setting up fake election websites, in an attempt to steal voters’ personal information, or get them to download dangerous files.

The Bureau suggests that you visit the U.S. Election Assistance Commission website for accurate information in a variety of languages. If you are concerned about clicking on risky links during the election or year-round, one smart action you can take is to install McAfee WebAdvisor, which warns you of risky sites before you click on them.

Although it can be tempting to believe election information posted on social media, especially by friends and family members, know that business school MIT Sloan says “fake news is at its peak” during online presidential years, and even your loved ones can be fooled.

But whether information is clickbait, or legitimate, it can still be posted to risky websites designed to steal your information, or download malware. That’s why McAfee released a new social media protection tool as part of WebAdvisor. Using color codes, the tool shows you which links are safe or risky right in your social feed, and can be used across all six major social media platforms. This makes it easier to avoid dangerous links posted on social channels. Given the increase in phishing we’ve observed in the last few months across PC and mobile platforms, a comprehensive security solution like McAfee® Total Protection can help keep your personal information and devices safe.

In-Person Voting

If you still plan to vote in person, or even better, volunteer as a poll worker, make sure that you have reliable information on voting times and locations. You’ll probably also want to look into local rules on health and safety precautions, so you are well prepared.

False and misleading information about COVID 19 has been swirling since the start of the pandemic, so it’s important that you seek verified information about the virus. Here again are some great tips from Judith on how to keep COVID misinformation from suppressing your vote.

 Exercise Your Right

Now that you know how to sidestep misinformation, find trusted resources, and plan your vote — either through the mail or in person— I hope that you will exercise your right, with confidence.

 

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Hone Your Cybersecurity Superpowers with Tips from Wonder Woman

Reading Time: ~ 5 min.

October 21 is Wonder Woman Day. It commemorates Wonder Woman’s first appearance in All Star Comics #8. With the upcoming release of Wonder Woman 1984, we took the opportunity to talk superheroes, superpowers and protecting data with our very own Briana Butler, Engineering Services Manager at Webroot.

Q: Wonder Woman got her powers from her divine mother, Queen Hippolyta. How did you get your data protection superpowers?

I had a reboot in life. I was previously a retail buyer then I went back to school for computer science and ended up switching to the business school. I was hired at Webroot to be a bridge between engineering and business – you have to have people that can speak both languages – and that’s exactly what I wanted to do and what I was trying to forge with my new career.

I first began as a data analyst, which meant working on privacy compliance, GDPR, CCPA, and data mapping, understanding where data is stored and processed, and who has access to it. My latest role is as an Engineering Services Manager, meaning I help engineering and product with personnel and hiring needs, ISO certification and making sure our development teams receive the training they need to stay up to date with the fast pace of tech.

Q: Wonder Woman had several superpowers, or super powerful gadgets, like indestructible bracelets and a lasso that forced people to tell the truth. Is cyber resilience a superpower?

Every superhero has different talents or powers. When we think of cyber resilience, it’s sort of like our own personal toolbox of powers that we can use against malicious actors who want to take our data and make money off it.

Our toolbox of cyber resilience includes basic best practices like knowing how to create a strong password, not clicking every link that comes into your email inbox and daily behaviors of how to navigate and defend yourself online. The goal is to live your best digital life confidently, without disruption.

Q: What about our data? Does that give us any powers that we wouldn’t have without it?

I think it’s more about understanding the power data has if we give it away. When we give people access to our data, that’s when it becomes powerful. Whether it’s corporations or malicious actors, when we willingly hand out our data, that gives it power because then, they know things about us. I talk a lot about privacy and why everyone should be more critical and cognizant of the data they’re sharing. We share a lot more than we realize. It’s time for all of us to understand what we’re sharing and then decide if we, personally, really want to share it.

Q: Wonder Woman encountered her fair share of comic strip villains, like the Duke of Deception, Doctor Psycho and Cheetah. Who are the villains in the digital world?

They’re the malicious actors and cybercriminals who would take your data and sell it on the open market. It could even be the person trying to get access to your Hulu account. There are also nation-state actors and the companies you buy things from. There’s a huge spectrum of villains, and they all want your data. There’s big money in data. So, it’s important that you’re aware of what’s being shared.

I’ve started reading privacy policies – those long, convoluted legal documents – to see if I can understand where I’m going to be sharing my information and make a more conscious decision.

For one large social platform, when I went through it, I started asking myself, am I really okay sharing this information? Do I really need this service or platform? Is it necessary in exchange for what I’m about to share with them? In the end, I didn’t sign up for it.

I’ve also gone through the frustrating and somewhat time-consuming act of cleaning up all my passwords and using a password manager. Most people say they have anywhere from 15 to 20 password-protected accounts. But when I went through all the places I’ve shared my password, it was upwards of 100!

One of my favorite topics is password strength. We recently did an analysis of password configurations with Maurice Schmidtler, our head data scientist, who created a Monte Carlo simulation. We took what you usually see when you’re told to create a password – like using uppercase and lowercase letters or special symbols – and applied those within the simulation. What we found was that the more constraints you put on a password, the fewer viable options you have for a strong password, meaning it decreases the number of good password options. Whereas if you focus on creating a strong password, where length is more important than the various character-type constraints, you’ll end up with a much stronger password. Length is strength because it takes more computing power to break.

Q: Wonder Woman was a founding member of the Justice League. So, even she needed the help of a squad to defeat the villains. Do we need help from a squad to be more cyber resilient?

We all need assistance because as humans, we are fallible. Inevitably, someone might click on a malicious link, or some unforeseen event might happen where you need a backup that’s going to allow you to recover data instead of losing it permanently.

When it comes to ransomware, or really any other attack, you need awareness. That’s why we encourage proactive education and regular security awareness training, so people truly understand the threat landscape and how to identify the most prevalent types of attacks. 

Q: At one point in the story, Wonder Woman surrendered her superpowers and used fighting skills instead. In what ways do we surrender our powers when it comes to cyber resilience?

Oversharing content or data about yourself, your name or address are surefire ways to surrender power in the digital age. All these things identify you and allow criminals to gain insight that can be used against you through social engineering.

You’re also surrendering power when you practice poor cyber hygiene, like repeating passwords across multiple logins. Once a cybercriminal gains access to one login, they can discover more details about you and use it elsewhere. For example, you may not be worried about a criminal getting access to your Netflix account, but if you use the same password there as you do with your bank, then the situation just became much more serious.

You also surrender power by not protecting your home network and not using VPN when you’re on public Wi-Fi. People often think “it won’t happen to me,” until it’s too late. And recovery can be costly and time-consuming. That’s why implementing layers of protection up front strengthens cyber resilience and helps keep your digital life easy, secure and free of complications.

Q: Are you going to watch the new Wonder Woman movie?

Oh sure! I will because I’ve seen all the other ones. I’m a big fan of Guardians of the Galaxy. And, of course, I love Iron Man. And I was a big fan of Black Panther, too. Doctor Strange is also one of my faves.

Q: If cybercriminals were villains from Wonder Woman, who would they be?

The Duke of Deception! Hackers, cybercriminals and nation-state actors are constant antagonists, and that’s exactly who we defend our users against.

The post Hone Your Cybersecurity Superpowers with Tips from Wonder Woman appeared first on Webroot Blog.

Cybersecurity 101: How to Protect Yourself from Hackers

The internet has changed a lot of things; some for the better and others for the worst. Everything that we use in our homes, from mobile devices to the Internet of Thing (IoT) products, rely on the internet. The extensive use of these products have the potential to erode our privacy. When it comes to privacy, it is under attack from all sides. Whether we realize it or not, hackers are always trying to gain information about us so that they can control our lives. In order to make your devices, online identity, and everything that you do online more secure, you have to follow a few things. In this article, I am going to highlight five cybersecurity tips that you need to know.

Install an Antivirus

The first thing you have to do is make use of an antivirus that will protect you against malicious programs. With so many different kinds of viruses and malware, you need to ensure that you prevent these attacks. Once you have installed antivirus, update it regularly so that its security patch is fool-proof. However, installing an antivirus doesn’t mean that you can browse any site you want to. You will still have to be very careful as hackers can still find ways to get into your system.

Use Unique Passwords for Login

One of the easiest and most prevalent ways hackers get access to your information is by getting hold of your passwords. You must use a unique password for different platforms so that even if one account gets hacked, the hacker can’t access the rest of your accounts. Moreover, you should use a strong password for every account that contains a combination of numbers, upper-case and lower-case letters, special signs, etc. Every little thing that you do to make your password more secure goes a long way.

Get a VPN and Use It

You might have heard about using a VPN when browsing the internet, but most people don’t fully understand what a VPN does. Say that you go to a coffee shop and want to connect to its Wi-Fi. You can never be sure that the network you are using is secure. Whether you are using your home network or a public network, someone can easily steal data from your computer if he bypasses your network security. The best way to prevent that is by using a VPN as it encrypts all your data. Here are some best value VPNs that you can use to secure your computer files.

Use Two Factor Authentication

While I agree that using two-factor authentication can take a lot of time, but let me tell you that it is worth it. Two-factor authentication adds an extra layer of security in case someone bypasses the first one. For example, even if the hacker gets access to your password, he will never be able to access your account without bypassing the second level of authentication.

Protect Your Social Media Privacy

Last but not least, you have to pay some attention to how you use social media. Social media scams are at the peak nowadays as hackers fish for information through these platforms. You have to be extremely careful when using platforms like Facebook as you voluntarily give out your information and present it publically. Make sure that you have configured every social media platform and think twice before revealing any personal information. Once you give out your personal information yourself, you can blame it on anyone but you. After all, regardless of how many security protocols we put into place, the weakest link in the security chain is humans themselves.

The post Cybersecurity 101: How to Protect Yourself from Hackers appeared first on CyberDB.

5G and the IoT: A Look Ahead at What’s Next for Your Home and Community

5G

5G and the IoT: A Look Ahead at What’s Next for Your Home and Community

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month, which is led by the U.S. government’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) in conjunction with the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA)—a national non-profit focused on cybersecurity education & awareness. McAfee is pleased to announce that we’re a proud participant.

Imagine it’s 20 years ago and someone at a dinner party predicts that one day you could pop down to the appliance store and buy an internet-connected fridge. Your year 2000 self might have shook that off and then then asked, “Why would someone ever do that?”

Yet here we are.

Today, so much is getting connected. Our appliances, security systems, and even our coffeemakers too.  So far this month, we’ve talked about protecting these connected things and securing these new digital frontiers as Internet of Things (IoT) devices transform not only our homes, but businesses and communities as well.

To wrap up Cybersecurity Awareness Month, let’s take a look ahead at how the next wave of connected devices could take shape by taking a look at the network that billions of them will find themselves on: 5G networks.

5G is the key

You’ve no doubt seen plenty of commercials from the big mobile carriers as they tout the rollout of their new, more powerful 5G networks. And more powerful they are. For starters, 5G is expected to operate roughly 10 times faster than the 4G LTE networks many of us enjoy now—with the potential to get yet faster than that over time.

While mention of faster speeds continues to be the top selling point in ads and the like, 5G offers another pair of big benefits: greater bandwidth and lower latency. Taken together, that means 5G networks can host more devices than before and with a near-instantaneous response time.

The implication of these advances is that billions and billions of new devices will connect to mobile networks directly, at terrific speeds, rather than to Wi-Fi networks. Of those, many billions will be IoT devices. And that means more than just phones.

What will those devices look like?

One answer is plenty more of what we’re already starting to see today—such as commercial and industrial devices that track fleet vehicles, open locks on tractor trailer deliveries based on location, monitor heating and air conditioning systems, oversee supply chains. We’ll also see more devices that manage traffic, meter utilities, and connect devices used in healthcare, energy, and agriculture. That’s in addition to the ones we’ll own ourselves, like wearables and even IoT tech in our cars.

All together, we’ll add about 15 billion new IoT devices to the 26 billion IoT devices already in play today for a total of an expected 41 billion IoT devices in 2025.

Securing 5G and the IoT

Citing those examples of IoT applications underscores the critical need for safety and security in the new 5G networks. This is a network we will count on in numerous ways. Businesses will trust their operations to the IoT devices that operate on it. Cities will run their infrastructure on 5G IoT devices. And we, as people, will use 5G networks for everything from entertainment to healthcare. Not only will IoT devices themselves need protection, yet the networks will need to be hardened for protection as well. And you can be certain that increased network security, and security in general, is a part of our future forecast.

The GSMA, an industry group representing more than 750 operators in the mobile space, calls out the inherent need for security for 5G networks in their 5G Reference Guide for Operators. In their words, “New threats will be developed as attackers are provided live service environment to develop their techniques. 5G is the first generation that recognizes this threat and has security at its foundation.” When you consider the multitude of devices and the multitude of applications that will find their way onto 5G, a “square one” emphasis on security makes absolute sense. It’s a must.

While standards and architectures are taking shape and in their first stages of implementation, we can expect operators to put even more stringent defenses in place, like improved encryption, ways of authenticating devices to ensure they’re not malicious, creating secure “slices” of the network, and more, which can all improve security.

Another consideration for security beyond the oncoming flood of emerging devices and services that’ll find their way onto 5G networks is the sheer volume of traffic and data they’ll generate. One estimate puts that figure of 5G traffic at 79.4 zettabytes (ZB) of data in 2025. (What’s a zettabyte? Imagine a 10 followed by 21 zeroes.) This will call for an evolution in security that makes further use of machine learning and AI to curb a similarly increased volume of threats—with technologies much like you see in our McAfee security products today.

The newest IoT devices making their way into your home

“Siri/Alexa/Cortana/Google, play Neko Case I Wish I Was the Moon.”

We’ve all gotten increasingly comfy with the idea of connected devices in our homes, like our smart assistants. Just in 2018, Juniper Research estimated that there’d be some 8 billion digital voice assistants globally by 2023, thanks in large part to things like smart TVs and other devices for the home. Expect to see more IoT devices like those available for use in and around your house.

What shape and form might they take? Aside from the voice-activated variety, plenty of IoT devices will help us automate our homes more and more. For example, you might have smart sensors in your garden that can tell when your tomatoes are thirsty and activate your soaker hoses for a drink—or other smart sensors placed near your water heater that will text you when they detect a leak.

Beyond that, we’re already purchasing connected lights and smart thermostats, yet how about connecting these things all together to create presets for your home? Imagine a setting called “Movie Night,” where just a simple voice command draws the shades, lowers the lights, turns on the gas fireplace, and fires up the popcorn maker. All you need to do is get your slippers.

Next, add in a degree of household AI, which can learn your preferences and habits. Aspects of your home may run themselves and predict things for you, like the fact that you like your coffee piping hot at 5:30am on Tuesdays. Your connected coffeemaker will have it ready for you.

These scenarios were once purely of the George Jetson variety (remember him?), yet more and more people will get to indulge in these comforts and conveniences as the technology becomes more pervasive and affordable.

Technology for All

One point of consideration with any emerging technology like the IoT on 5G is access.

This year drove home a hard reality: access to high-speed internet, whether via mobile device or a home network is no longer a luxury. It’s a utility. Like running water. We need it to work. We need it to study. We need it to bank, shop, and simply get things done.

Yet people in underserved and rural communities in the U.S. still have no access to broadband internet in their homes. Nearly 6 in 10 of U.S. parents with lower incomes say their child may face digital obstacles in schoolwork because of reduced access to devices and quality internet service. And I’ve heard anecdotes from educators about kids taking classes online who have to pull into their school’s parking lot to get proper Wi-Fi, simply because they don’t have a quality connection at home.

The point is this: as these IoT innovations continue to knit their way into our lives and the way the world works, we can’t forget that there’s still a digital divide that will take years of effort, investment, and development before that gap gets closed. And I see us closing that gap in partnership, as people and communities, businesses and governments, all stand to benefit when access to technology increases.

So as we look to the future, my hope is that we all come to see high-speed internet connections for what they are—an absolute essential—and take the steps needed to deliver on it. That’s an advance I’d truly embrace.

Stay Updated 

To stay updated on all things McAfee and for more resources on staying secure from home, follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

 

 

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