Daily Archives: June 25, 2019

Catch a Ride Via Wearable

More often than not, commuters and travelers alike want to get to their destination quickly and easily. The advent of wearable payments helps make this a reality, as passengers don’t have to pull out a wallet or phone to pay for entry. Adding to that, users are quickly adopting wearable technology that has this payment technology embedded, causing transportation systems to take notice and adopt corresponding technology as a result. Unfortunately, there’s a chance this rapid adoption may catch the eye of cybercriminals as well.

Just last month, the New York City Subway system introduced turnstiles that open with a simple wave of a wearable, like an Apple Watch or Fitbit. Wearables may provide convenience and ease, but they also provide an open door to cybercriminals. With more connections to secure, there are more vectors for vulnerabilities and potential cyberthreats. This is especially the case with wearables, which often don’t have security built-in from the start.

App developers and manufacturers are hard-pressed to keep up with innovation, so security isn’t always top of mind, which puts user data at risk. As one of the most valuable things cybercriminals can get ahold of, the data stored on wearables can be used for a variety of purposes. These threats include phishing, gaining access to online accounts, or transferring money illegally. While the possibility of these threats looms, the adoption of wearables shows no sign of slowing down, with an estimated 1.1 billion in use by 2022. This means developers, manufacturers, and users need to work together in order to keep these handy gadgets secure and cybercriminals out.

Both consumers and transport systems need to be cautious of how wearables can be used to help, or hinder, us in the near future. Rest assured, even if cybercriminals utilize this technology, McAfee’s security strategy will continue to keep pace with the ever-changing threat landscape. In the meantime, consider these tips to stay secure while traveling to your destination:

  • Always keep your software and apps up-to-date.It’s a best practice to update software and apps when prompted to help fix vulnerabilities when they’re found.
  • Add an extra layer of security. Since wearables connect to smartphones, if it becomes infected, there is a good chance the connected smartphone will be impacted as well. Invest in comprehensive mobile security to apply to your mobile devices to stay secure while on-the-go.
  • Clear your data cache. As previously mentioned, wearables hold a lot of data. Be sure to clear your cache every so often to ensure it doesn’t fall into the wrong hands.
  • Avoid storing critical information. Social Security Numbers (SSN), bank account numbers, and addresses do not need to be stored on your wearable. And if you’re making an online purchase, do so on a laptop with a secure connection.
  • Connect to public Wi-Fi with caution. Cybercriminals can use unsecured public Wi-Fi as a foothold into a wearable. If you need to connect to public Wi-Fi, use a virtual private network, or VPN, to stay secure.

Interested in learning more about IoT and mobile security trends and information? Follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and ‘Like” us on Facebook.

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The $1.5 Million Email

Ransomware has been around since the late 1980s, but in recent years, it has emerged as one of the largest financial threats facing the public and private sector alike. According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, ransomware is the fastest-growing malware threat—and according to a report by Recorded Future in May, more than 170 state and local governments have been the victims of ransomware attacks since 2013.

In addition to improved ransomware capabilities, such as military-grade encryption algorithms, two key factors have emboldened cybercriminals to launch such attacks: the rise of hard-to-trace cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin, and the tendency of unprepared targets to continue meeting scammers’ demands, even as these demands become increasingly audacious.

One such target was the city of Riviera Beach, Fla., a waterfront suburb north of Palm Beach, which recently paid a near-record 65 Bitcoins to a gang of hackers after a ransomware attack brought the city to a halt.

On May 29, a city employee opened an email containing a piece of malware, which quickly infected nearly every city computer network. With the municipal computer system held hostage, all operations were hobbled—everything from the city’s website, email server and VoIP phones to the water utility pump stations. 911 dispatchers were forced to take down caller information on paper, employees and vendors had to be paid with paper checks, utility payments could only be accepted by snail mail or in person, and police officers had to resort to digging through closets at headquarters to find paper traffic citation pads.

City leaders were told they could make all of these problems go away—if they simply complied with the ransomers’ demand to remit 65 bitcoin (roughly $600,000) in exchange for the decryption key.

While the city had originally decided not to pay the ransom—opting instead to invest $914,000 into purchasing hundreds of new desktop and laptop computers and other hardware in an attempt to circumvent the issue—these measures ultimately failed. Three weeks after the original attack, based on the advice of an outside security consulting firm, the city council met to discuss next steps—and unanimously decided, after just two minutes of discussion, to acquiesce. The total cost, including the unbudgeted-for hardware, the consultation, and of course, the ransom itself, amounted to more than $1.5 million. For a city of just 35,000 residents, the cost was staggering, even after insurance paid its percentage.

While Riviera Beach was among the latest targets, it certainly won’t be the last, or the largest—according to a 2018 Deloitte-NASCIO survey, nearly half of states lack a separate cybersecurity budget, and a majority allocate under 3% of IT budgets to cyberthreat prevention.

But with ransomware attacks continuing to unleash a post-internet world on any unsuspecting target at any time, many targets are finding that, as much as they thought they lacked the resources to prevent such attacks, they’re even less prepared for the aftermath. Once infected, they’re left with two unsavory options: Pay the ransom, knowing that there’s no guarantee the hackers will decrypt the systems or that they’ll be decrypted perfectly. And even if they are, there are still the moral implications: When governments pay such ransoms, they’re not only putting taxpayer dollars directly into the hands of criminals, they’re also encouraging future ransomware attacks. The alternative, of course, is to try to rebuild…often from the ground up.

While cyberinsurance policies can give the illusion of protection, this solution will likely become less viable as the frequency of attacks continues to rise and the amount demanded continues to skyrocket. The goal, then, becomes for companies, government entities and individuals to prepare for and prevent these attacks before they’re targeted. While large-scale legislative solutions, such as outlawing the payment of ransomware demands, may eventually offer some relief, here are some steps that companies, individuals and government entities can take right now to prevent being victims:

  1. Learn: Resources such as NoMoreRansom.org—an initiative created by the National High Tech Crime Unit of Netherlands, Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre, and McAfee—aim to provide prevention education and help ransomware victims retrieve their encrypted data without having to pay criminals.
  2. Educate: When it comes to ransomware, knowing isn’t half the battle—it’s the entire battle. When millions of dollars hinge on your employees’ decision whether or not to open an email, organization-wide training on how to spot malicious emails and social engineering schemes may pay for itself many, many times over.
  3. Backup: There’s no reason to pay criminals to decrypt your data if you have access to a copy. Frequently back up essential data, ideally storing it both locally and on the cloud.
  4. Update: Always downloading the newest version of your operating system or apps helps you stay ahead of threats
  5. Defend: Sufficiently robust security solutions can protect you from known threats as well as those that have not yet been formally detected.

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Key Components to Consider When Kicking Off Your Veracode AppSec Program

I’ve been working as a Veracode security program manager since 2013, and have adopted AppSec best practices in those six years that contribute to successful AppSec programs. I started my journey here as a program manager and was fortunate enough to manage and lead some of Veracode’s largest and most complex customer programs. Today, I’m managing a team of program managers.

In this blog, I will walk through four key components to consider when kicking off your program with Veracode. These are all components I’ve implemented when managing large programs, and which have led to AppSec success by helping organizations understand what’s needed in order to have a successful, well-functioning application security program.  

Customer Engagement

The first component is Veracode customer engagement. You might be thinking, “of course, this is a given,” but in some cases I’ve seen (moreso in the past), it’s not. The No. 1 roadblock with the customers I’ve seen struggle has been lack of engagement. An established security team (on the client side) who can act as the liaison between the development organization and Veracode is very important. In some cases, increasingly so with the DevSecOps push, dev management is involved as well.

When I first began my journey with Veracode, security didn’t exist at many organizations, so an engaged team also didn’t exist. Today, when I go on-site and meet with my customers, I frequently thank them. I thank them for their dedication and engagement level, because without the primary, day-to-day contacts, it would be more difficult to get the necessary traction. At Veracode, we say it’s a team effort. Customers who identify teams who are willing and eager to work with their Veracode contacts is the No. 1 step toward success. This is also a team or individual who can act as a Veracode advocate and work with the Veracode SPM to tackle Veracode initiatives and be an internal presence that helps drive and motivate, making security No. 1 so that our clients’ customers are confident they’re using secure products and applications.

Cross-Functional Communication

My second on the list is cross-functional communication. It is imperative for a program to have cross-functional communication between the security team and main teams involved, including executives and the development organization. Communicating policy mandates, remediation plans, and automation plans across all functions, including developers and DevOps teams, early on in the program, is going to put a program ahead. Understanding what the best communication method is in order to circulate important plans across teams, whether it’s through email or a newsletter, and who should be delivering it, should be well thought out. Veracode Program Management acts as an extension of our customers’ teams and, therefore, can help with messaging and delivery.  

Ultimately, communication will prevent confusion and promote awareness, which is important to the health of a program. When a developer is introduced to security scanning requirements or remediation plans later in the development lifecycle, it can affect release dates. The team will be in a much better position if they know early on what they’re responsible for and when, and any consequences if they do not incorporate security into their SDLC.

Application Inventory

Next is application inventory, which is another major component. This is a list of your organization’s high-risk applications that are most critical to the business and could impact company brand or reputation if breached, OR application inventory could be all applications in the organization. If you do not know this information early on, it could cause delays when kicking off a program.

We recommend companies scan all their applications. However, many organizations start their programs with a baseline of only their high-risk applications. If you fall into this category, having that list ready and sharing it with your Veracode Security Program Manager will keep everyone in alignment. Your SPM will provide a list of the important information needed when gathering application inventory information, and prior to setting up application profiles in the Veracode platform.

Program Strategy

Finally, once you’ve identified your team, have a communication plan in place, and have created an application inventory, the next step is to map out program strategy. This is where your Veracode SPM will have a discovery session with you and your team to discuss the future of the program, and obtain key information to ensure success. He or she will also review the critical activities that need to take place in the security program to keep it on track. Additionally, the SPM will review measureable metrics with you and discuss what the key metrics are to the organization/teams in order to track program success down the road. The SPM will handle the operational effort to get you there and report back regularly to ensure that you are achieving your organizational goals through those metrics.

The SPM will ask several questions to help develop and kick off your program, including:

  • Details about your SDLC environment, development tools, and systems the development teams are using. This is imperative as the push to shift left and toward DevSecOps is a major focus for many organizations today. The end goal is to fully automate your application security program, because automating and integrating security into your CI/CD pipeline will make for a seamless program that will save you and your developers time and money.
  • Identifying development teams and setting onboarding schedules. Training users on how to use the Veracode platform will help immensely with developer adoption and awareness. Veracode provides training and always offers flexible schedules to accommodate developers globally.
  • Establishing a remediation process and workflow. The end goal is to bring down those very high and high flaws to get you closer to being compliant with your organization’s policies and standards.

Lastly, we will have discussions around automation and integration into your CI/CD pipeline. As mentioned, this will save time for developers by streamlining the scanning process through automation and having them consume Veracode scan results in their environment, rather than manually running scans and reviewing results in the UI.

Whether you’re an existing customer or potential customer, if all of these items are checked off at the beginning, then you will be on the right path to kick-starting a robust application security program that everyone at your organization will be onboard with.  

Learn More

Get more details on maturing your application security program in our guide, Everything You Need to Know About Maturing Your Application Security Program.

And you can always get valuable tips and advice on managing AppSec from other Veracode customers in our Community.

3 strategies for building an information protection program

Five years ago, we started on a journey to update and simplify information protection at Microsoft. We had a manual data classification process that our users didn’t use effectively and didn’t work with our data storage or database technology. We had to find ways to re-classify data and build effective tools while protecting our most important asset, customer, and employee information.

We’ve learned a lot about data protection and tools and today we’re sharing some of our best practices for:

  • Laying the groundwork for protecting information.
  • Protecting trade secrets.
  • Starting your information protection journey.

Laying the groundwork for protecting information

Identifying the location of data—The first step to creating a strategy is discovering where your data and major storage places are so you can create a data landscape. Do you have data on your endpoints? Start by looking across your organization to identify your customer data, regulatory data, and other sensitive information.

Classifying the data—Classifying data is the most important and most difficult step. At Microsoft, we used a custom three-level manual label classification process but found that no one understood how to apply them correctly. We worked with legal, HR, and other groups to identify labels that made sense for our company with a goal that they could be applied automatically.

Our objective is to ensure that our data and our customer data is handled properly, classified correctly, and is protected. We’re a global company and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the baseline—and one of our key tenets—for how we think about our information and how we protect it. We replaced the manual classification labels with a more intuitive labeling taxonomy that better aligns with industry standards:

  • Non-Business: Data that is non-business related and doesn’t belong to Microsoft.
  • Public: Data designed for public consumption.
  • General: Business data not meant for public consumption.
  • Confidential: Sensitive business data that could cause business harm if over-shared.
  • Highly Confidential: Very sensitive business data that would certainly cause the business harm if over-shared.

Identifying and resolving old data—Before you roll out new tools, there may be old data that you need to review and resolve. For example, you may need to clean up, delete, or protect your data. When reviewing data, consider the age of the data and if anyone is still using a document. Prioritize and create rules for saving, deleting, and protecting data.

Protecting the data—You want to protect the data based on classification. Protecting customer and personal information is at the core of what we’re trying to protect at Microsoft. For smaller companies—or companies just starting to develop an information protection program—your biggest return will be finding customer data so you can protect it. Building customer trust and protecting customer information is key to an information protection program.

Protecting trade secrets

Protecting our identities is an extremely important part of the information protection journey. But what if you come across a document with trade secret information? You should probably work with the group that handles trade secrets at your company. We have a white glove program with HR where we build specific programs for specific business units. Using products like Key Vault can help protect sensitive data.

Starting your information protection journey

If you’re just starting to build an information protection program, we recommend the following three-step process:

  1. Governance, risk, and compliance—Have your legal and HR teams help you define the types of information you need to defend. Always focus on customer data and sensitive information.
  2. Education and awareness—Labels are always important because they’re foundation for identifying the difference between confidential and general business data. Use terminology that’s easy for users to understand. Train them and use tools to implement your solutions. We used education campaigns and we also built tool tips and right management service (RMS) templates into our products. For example, if I’m working in an Office experience, I might get a tool tip prompting me to classify a document as confidential. We found that 50 percent of the time, users will increase the confidentiality of the document.
  3. Tools roll out—When you’re working with tools, remember that you’re typically interacting with customer and employee information. It’s an opportunity to build trust as a company. Some of the information protection tools we use include Office 365 Information Protection and Azure Information Protection, which provides labeling functionality we can push to endpoints, as well as label and tool tips for Office documents. We also use the file share scanner and Windows Information Protection (which is still in pilot phase).

Building an information protection program is not one-size-fits-all, but if you choose classification terms, terms that are easy to understand and implement, proactively educate users, and bake information protection into existing processes to minimize impact, you can increase the success of the program.

For more information about how Microsoft has implemented these strategies, watch the IT Showcase webinar, Speaking of security: Information protection.

The post 3 strategies for building an information protection program appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Tracing the Supply Chain Attack on Android

Earlier this month, Google disclosed that a supply chain attack by one of its vendors resulted in malicious software being pre-installed on millions of new budget Android devices. Google didn’t exactly name those responsible, but said it believes the offending vendor uses the nicknames “Yehuo” or “Blazefire.” What follows is a deep dive into the identity of that Chinese vendor, which appears to have a long and storied history of pushing the envelope on mobile malware.

“Yehuo” () is Mandarin for “wildfire,” so one might be forgiven for concluding that Google was perhaps using another dictionary than most Mandarin speakers. But Google was probably just being coy: The vendor in question appears to have used both “blazefire” and “wildfire” in two of many corporate names adopted for the same entity.

An online search for the term “yehuo” reveals an account on the Chinese Software Developer Network which uses that same nickname and references the domain blazefire[.]com. More searching points to a Yehuo user on gamerbbs[.]cn who advertises a mobile game called “Xiaojun Junji,” and says the game is available at blazefire[.]com.

Research on blazefire[.]com via Domaintools.com shows the domain was assigned in 2015 to a company called “Shanghai Blazefire Network Technology Co. Ltd.” just a short time after it was registered by someone using the email address “tosaka1027@gmail.com“.

The Shanghai Blazefire Network is part of a group of similarly-named Chinese entities in the “mobile phone pre-installation business and in marketing for advertisers’ products to install services through mobile phone installed software.”

“At present, pre-installed partners cover the entire mobile phone industry chain, including mobile phone chip manufacturers, mobile phone design companies, mobile phone brand manufacturers, mobile phone agents, mobile terminal stores and major e-commerce platforms,” reads a descriptive blurb about the company.

A historic records search at Domaintools on that tosaka1027@gmail.com address says it was used to register 24 Internet domain names, including at least seven that have been conclusively tied to the spread of powerful Android mobile malware.

Two of those domains registered to tosaka1027@gmail.com — elsyzsmc[.]com and rurimeter[.]com — were implicated in propagating the Triada malware. Triada is the very same malicious software Google said was found pre-installed on many of its devices and being used to install spam apps that display ads.

In July 2017, Russian antivirus vendor Dr.Web published research showing that Triada had been installed by default on at least four low-cost Android models. In 2018, Dr.Web expanded its research when it discovered the Triada malware installed on 40 different models of Android devices.

At least another five of the domains registered to tosaka1027@gmail.com — 99youx[.]com, buydudu[.]com, kelisrim[.]com, opnixi[.]com and sonyba[.]comwere seen as early as 2016 as distribution points for the Hummer Trojan, a potent strain of Android malware often bundled with games that completely compromises the infected device.

A records search at Domaintools for “Shanghai Blazefire Network Technology Co” returns 11 domains, including blazefire[.]net, which is registered to a yehuo@blazefire.net. For the remainder of this post, we’ll focus on the bolded domain names below:

Domain Name      Create Date   Registrar
2333youxi[.]com 2016-02-18 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD
52gzone[.]com 2012-11-26 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD
91gzonep[.]com 2012-11-26 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD
blazefire[.]com 2000-08-24 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD
blazefire[.]net 2010-11-22 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD
hsuheng[.]com 2015-03-09 GODADDY.COM, LLC
jyhxz.net 2013-07-02 —
longmen[.]com 1998-06-19 GODADDY.COM, LLC
longmenbiaoju[.]com 2012-12-09 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD
oppayment[.]com 2013-10-09 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD
tongjue[.]net 2014-01-20 ALIBABA CLOUD COMPUTING (BEIJING) CO., LTD

Following the breadcrumbs from some of the above domains we can see that “Blazefire” is a sprawling entity with multiple business units and names. For example, 2333youxi[.]com is the domain name for Shanghai Qianyou Network Technology Co., Ltd., a firm that says it is “dedicated to the development and operation of Internet mobile games.”

Like the domain blazefire[.]com, 2333youxi[.]com also was initially registered to tosaka1027@gmail.com and soon changed to Shanghai Blazefire as the owner.

The offices of Shanghai Quianyou Network — at Room 344, 6th Floor, Building 10, No. 196, Ouyang Rd, Shanghai, China — are just down the hall from Shanghai Wildfire Network Technology Co., Ltd., reportedly at Room 35, 6th Floor, Building 10, No. 196, Ouyang Rd, Shanghai.

The domain tongjue[.]net is the Web site for Shanghai Bronze Network Technology Co., Ltd., which appears to be either another name for or a sister company to Shanghai Tongjue Network Technology Co., Ltd.  According to its marketing literature, Shanghai Tongjue is situated one door down from the above-mentioned Shanghai Quianyou Network — at Room 36, 6th Floor, Building 10, No. 196, Ouyang Road.

“It has developed into a large domestic wireless Internet network application,” reads a help wanted ad published by Tongjue in 2016.  “The company is mainly engaged in mobile phone pre-installation business.”

That particular help wanted ad was for a “client software development” role at Tongjue. The ad said the ideal candidate for the position would have experience with “Windows Trojan, Virus or Game Plug-ins.” Among the responsibilities for this position were:

-Crack the restrictions imposed by the manufacturer on the mobile phone.
-Research and master the android [operating] system
-Reverse the root software to study the root of the android mobile phone
-Research the anti-brushing and provide anti-reverse brushing scheme

WHO IS BLAZEFIRE/YEHUO?

Many of the domains mentioned above have somewhere in their registration history the name “Hsu Heng” and the email address yehuo@blazefire.net. Based on an analysis via cyber intelligence firm 4iq.com of passwords and email addresses exposed in multiple data breaches in years past, the head of Blazefire goes by the nickname “Hagen” or “Haagen” and uses the email “chuda@blazefire.net“.

Searching on the phrase “chuda” in Mandarin turns up a 2016 story at the Chinese gaming industry news site Youxiguancha.com that features numerous photos of Blazefire employees and their offices. That story also refers to the co-founder and CEO of Blazefire variously as “Chuda” and “Chu da”.

“Wildfire CEO Chuda is a tear-resistant boss with both sports (Barcelona hardcore fans) and literary genre (playing a good guitar),” the story gushes. “With the performance of leading the wildfire team and the wildfire product line in 2015, Chu has won the top ten new CEO awards from the first Black Rock Award of the Hardcore Alliance.”

Interestingly, the registrant name “Chu Da” shows up in the historical domain name records for longmen[.]com, perhaps Shanghai Wildfire’s oldest and most successful mobile game ever. That record, from April 2015, lists Chu Da’s email address as yehuo@blazefire.com.

The CEO of Wildfire/Blazefire, referred to only as “Chuda” or “Hagen.”

It’s not clear if Chuda is all or part of the CEO’s real name, or just a nickname; the vice president of the company lists their name simply as “Hua Wei,” which could be a real name or a pseudonymous nod to the embattled Chinese telecom giant by the same name.

According to this cached document from Chinese business lookup service TianYanCha.com, Chuda also is a senior executive at six other companies.

Google declined to elaborate on its blog post. Shanghai Wildfire did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

It’s perhaps worth noting that while Google may be wise to what’s cooking over at Shanghai Blazefire/Wildfire Network Technology Co., Apple still has several of the company’s apps available for download from the iTunes store, as well as others from Shanghai Qianyou Network Technology.

Endpoint’s Role in Enterprise Data Protection

Data is a big deal. As the foundation of a modern-day business, data drives organizations’ everyday operations. It provides insights, indicates trends, and informs business decisions. This means securing an organization’s data is of the utmost importance, especially when it comes to defending against attacks emerging out of today’s threat landscape. And though there are standards that have been published to protect customer data and data context, these rules are still incomplete and imperfect, given any published best practice that works for organizations may also create immediate targets for an attacker to bypass. Let’s examine some key threats that compromise enterprise data, and the role endpoint security plays in safeguarding that information.

Means to an End

For many cybercriminals, data is the end goal and endpoint devices are the avenue for getting there. Whether it’s through a compromised app, credential theft, malware, ransomware, or a phishing attack – cyberattacks are consistently testing enterprises in an attempt to find a weakness. That’s because the endpoint acts as the ultimate gateway to critical enterprise data. If compromised, it could cause ripple effects on an organization’s day-to-day functions, causing downtime or a longer attack dwell time, permitting cybercriminals to harvest more sensitive data.

The good news? Doors work both ways. Just as endpoints can create gateways to important data, they can also stop cybercrime in its tracks, if properly secured.

Keeping the Door Locked

The best option for safeguarding your data is securing it at the start – the endpoint. By implementing agile and adaptive endpoint security on every device in your organization, enterprises can ensure data stays locked down. The key is leveraging endpoint solutions that go beyond the more traditional deterministic security feature like anti-malware and include predictive technology like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). This type of technology can quickly sift through security incidents in order to identify the real threats posed to endpoint devices, which helps security teams automatically reduce the time required to address threats. Security teams should also ensure they leverage endpoint security solutions that provide increased, centralized visibility into all of their organization’s devices. This kind of visibility is crucial for not only rapid detection, but also to ensure user behavior is being tracked and policies are being enforced.

For security teams aiming to stop modern-day cyberthreats at the start, adopt security solutions such as McAfee MVISION Mobile and McAfee MVISION Endpoint, which have machine learning algorithms and analysis built into their architecture to help identify malicious behavior and attack patterns affecting endpoint devices. To add to that, teams should also leverage solutions such as McAfee DLP Endpoint, which empowers IT staff with increased visibility, giving them knowledge of what all their users are doing at all times.  With this kind of technology in play, enterprise data won’t be anyone else’s business other than the organization it belongs to.

To learn more about effective endpoint security strategy, be sure to follow us @McAfee and @McAfee_Business.

The post Endpoint’s Role in Enterprise Data Protection appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

US-Iran Cyberwar Heats Up

President Trump has authorized a round of cyber attacks against Iran, and U.S. companies and agencies are bracing for counter attacks.

The Washington Post reported that the U.S. cyberattack had disabled Iranian missile control systems. The attack was the latest in escalating tensions between the two countries, which includes the recent downing of an unmanned surveillance drone. 

“This operation imposes costs on the growing Iranian cyberthreat, but also serves to defend the United States Navy and shipping operations in the Strait of Hormuz,” said former senior White House cybersecurity official Thomas Bossert.

The Department of Homeland Security Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) issued an alert warning organizations of potential retaliation from Iranian hackers, including the deployment of “wiper” malware that deletes data from targeted computers and networks. 

“Iranian regime actors and proxies are increasingly using destructive ‘wiper’ attacks, looking to do much more than just steal data and money,” said CISA director Christopher Krebs 

Cyber warfare is in addition to what the U.S. government has called “kinetic” actions, i.e. more traditional military operations. Earlier this month, the U.S. Cyber Command reportedly deployed offensive malware against Russia’s electrical grid.

The post US-Iran Cyberwar Heats Up appeared first on Adam Levin.

Veracode to showcase DevSecOps solutions at inaugural AWS re:Inforce

Developers and security professionals from around the world are descending on Boston this week to attend the first AWS security conference, re:Inforce, for what promises to be one of the most exciting events in recent memory in the industry.

As a pioneer of application security that is helping educate both security and dev teams in building more secure code, Veracode is proud to be a platinum sponsor of AWS re:Inforce here in Boston, a world renowned hub of cybersecurity innovation.

With so many security conferences taking place throughout the year around the world, and with more companies entering the market and crowding niches, it can have a dizzying effect for companies buying security solutions.

What makes AWS re:Inforce different?

Companies seeking to change the world are using software to push entire industries forward with new advancements, better insights and greater efficiencies. At the same time, new threat vectors appear, and new languages and frameworks change how we create software, causing cyberattacks to evolve and become more sophisticated. The security of software is just as critical as the function of the software itself. But, if the software you are developing or buying is insecure, you can’t achieve your vision – no matter how important or innovative it is.

Two movements that are allowing innovation and security to evolve in harmony – the shift to cloud-native solutions and the evolution of DevSecOps – will be on full display at AWS re:Inforce. That’s because we’ve moved from a world where applications were only run in the cloud to one where they are written and live in the cloud throughout their lifecycle. As a result, we are experiencing a dramatic increase in scan frequency and our customers are adopting application security practices earlier in their continuous integration pipeline. More frequent, incremental scans in the SDLC – a pillar of DevSecOps – allow companies to fix flaws more than 11 times more quickly than the typical organization. Fundamentally, when a company’s applications are more secure and their development teams are not slowed down by security, they achieve a competitive advantage.

Veracode is evolving its SaaS architecture by leveraging the power of AWS to better meet increased demand for DevSecOps practices from customers. Development teams are looking for fast, accurate application security tools integrated directly into their CI/CD work cycles. Veracode processes an average of more than 400,000 scans per month for customers around the world, and companies expect fast scan times and the ability to rapidly scale their volume of scanning given that developers scan at every code check in. Veracode’s combination of technology, expertise, and services backed by AWS cloud services helps organizations more effectively find and fix the vulnerabilities in their software.

Veracode has also achieved Advanced Technology Partner Status in the AWS Partner Network (APN). This achievement is the highest tier within the AWS Partner Network. It recognizes a rigorous qualification process that includes AWS technical certification and validation with a wide range of customer references. The technical certification included an extensive review of the Veracode architecture leveraging AWS services against AWS published best practices and benchmarks for security, scalability and availability.

At AWS re:Inforce, attendees can visit the Veracode booth (#813) to learn more about the company’s application security testing platform, get a Veracode t-shirt and participate in an interactive experience designed to test developers’ secure programming knowledge.

On the evening of Tuesday, June 25, Veracode is hosting a “Conquer the Cloud” afterparty at City Tap House in Boston. Securing the cloud takes a tribe of AppSec heroes, and we’d love your tribe to meet ours over beers, games, and live music during AWS re:Inforce. Take a moment to register here.

Finally, don’t miss a presentation at re:Inforce by John Maski, Veracode Application Security Consultant and former director of DevSecOps at AT&T, titled “Integrating AppSec Into Your DevSecOps on AWS.” John will describe securing CI/CD pipelines in enterprise environments and “shifting left” with security. This talk is taking place at 10:15 am, Wed., June 26 in the Solutions Theater.

Streaming Safer Means Streaming Legally

Reading Time: ~ 2 min.

It’s been more than a decade since Netflix launched its on-demand online streaming service, drastically changing the way we consume media. In 2019, streaming accounts for an astonishing 58 percent of all internet traffic, with Netflix alone claiming a 15 percent share of that use. But as streaming has become more common, so has the exploitation of streaming technologies. Some consumers stream illegally to cut costs, perceiving it to be a victimless crime. But as the saying goes: there’s no such thing as a free lunch. Streaming is no exception.

Jailbreak!

By downloading illegal streaming apps from third-party sources (i.e. outside of the Apple® App Store or Google™ Play), users may think they’re capitalizing on a clever loophole to access free services. However, according to a startling study conducted by Digital Citizens, 44 percent of households using pirated streaming services experienced a cybersecurity breach of one or more of their devices. That means if you use any type of illegal streaming device or app, you are six times more likely to fall victim to a cybersecurity attack than households using legal streaming services. Since a reported 12 million homes—in North America alone) are actively using pirated streams, that means illegal streaming may have led to up to 5 million potentially undetected breaches.

Why are illegal streams so attractive to cybercriminals? Because you’re probably streaming using devices and applications that are connected to your home network. Unfortunately, the firewall on the average home router does not provide adequate security against attacks. Any malware introduced by the streaming software is likely able to get through successfully. If you’re using a Window® computer or device, that means the malware can infiltrate not the device you’re actively using, but also any other Windows devices using the same internet connection. By spreading itself across multiple devices, malware makes its own removal that much more difficult. Pair these details with the fact that illegal streaming users are less likely to report a malicious app, illegal streams provide a haven for cybercriminals in which they can easily attack users, infect their machines, steal their data, and hold their files for ransom.  

Cybersecurity breaches caused by illegal streaming can manifest in many ways. For example, a popular illegal movie and live sports streaming app was observed scraping the connected WiFi name and password, as well as other sensitive information, according to ThreatPost.

How You Can Stream Safer

Ultimately, nobody can guarantee the security of an illegal stream. The truth is that legal streaming is the only safer streaming. That doesn’t mean you have to go through the giants, like Netflix or Hulu. Users can now access many low-cost, legal streaming options—including a few that are ad-supported and are actually free. So why put yourself and your family at risk for the sake of an illegal stream?

If you’re worried that someone with access to your WiFi network may be streaming illegally, thereby putting you and your devices in danger, make sure all of your devices are using up-to-date antivirus software to help stop cyberattacks and prevent malware infections. More importantly, talk with your family and friends about the real cost of “free” streaming. They’ll be more cautious once they fully understand the risks.


Looking for more home security education? Check out our Home + Mobile playlist on YouTube.


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BH Consulting in the media: supply chain security still a concern

The Huawei controversy has raised fundamental questions around supply chain security, Brian Honan has told Infosecurity Magazine. In a video interview recorded at Infosecurity Europe 2019 conference in London, BH Consulting’s CEO said the issue of technology containing alleged backdoors to enable spying has led to “interesting conversations” in the security community.

The question boils down to whether it’s possible to build secure systems if there’s no trust in the technology platform they’re built upon, Brian said. “Unless we actually build something ourselves from absolute scratch, we are relying on third parties, and how much trust can we give to those third parties? So the bigger issue becomes: how you secure your supply chain?”

For security professionals, securing their company’s supply chain needs a more rigorous due diligence process than asking vendors whether they have antivirus software on their PCs. It’s about “asking the right questions into the right levels, and digging deep into the technology, depending on what your requirements are,” Brian said.

Huawei to the danger zone

Noting the accusations that Huawei technology has security bugs, Brian said that the same is true of products from many other places including the US, UK or Europe. “There’s no such thing as 100% secure systems. Take the Intel chips that we have in all our servers: they have security bugs in them,” he said.

Emphasising that he wasn’t trying to defend Huawei, Brian said: “A lot of what we’re reading in the press and the media, there’s nothing to substantiate the claims behind it.” The larger question about whether any bugs are accidental, or deliberately placed backdoors that allow Government-level spying, is “outside the remit of our industry,” he said.

The chain

Even if a security professional decided not to use a certain brand of equipment in their network, there’s a question of what happens when their information travels elsewhere within their company’s external supply chain, or through its internet service provider. Instead, infosec professionals should focus on protecting information at rest or in transit, since the early internet engineers designed it to share information, not keep it secret. “We have been trying to build security on top of a very unsafe foundation. We need to look at ways of how we keep our data safe, no matter where it goes or how far it travels,” Brian said.

As for what’s next in security, Brian said regulations will stay at the forefront over the next year. “GDPR isn’t over. GDPR is the evolution of data protection laws that we had already… the regulations are still being enforced. We still have to continue looking after GDPR.”  Some of the earliest court cases relating to GDPR are due to conclude soon, with potentially large fines for offenders. He also said Brexit is “the elephant in the room”, given how it could affect the way that European companies deal with UK businesses, and vice versa.

Toys in the attic

The ePrivacy Regulation (ePR) will have a huge say in how companies embed cookies on their websites and how they communicate and market to customers. Regulations like the EU Cybersecurity Act look set to impose rules on IoT or ‘smart’ devices. Their security – or lack of it – has long been a thorny issue. Brian recently commented on this issue in an article for the Irish Times about smart toys and we’ve also blogged about it before on Security Watch.

Summing up the likely short-term developments in security, Brian said: “A lot of things in the next 12-24 months are going to have a big impact on our industry, and it’s where the regulators are going to play catch-up on the technology. It’s going to be interesting to see how those two worlds collide.” You can watch the 15-minute video here (free, but sign-in required).

Panel discussion at Infosecurity Europe 2019. From left: Peter Brown, Group Manager Technology Policy, UK ICO; Steve Wright, GDPR & CISO Advisor, Bank of England; Titta Tajwe, CISO, News UK; Deborah Haworth, Penguin Random House UK; and panel moderator Brian Honan, CEO of BH Consulting

Regulate

Also during Infosecurity Europe, Brian moderated a debate on dealing with complex regulations while ensuring privacy, security and compliance. It featured with data protection and security practitioners from the Bank of England, Penguin Random House UK, News UK and the UK Information Commissioner’s Office. Bank Info Security has a good writeup of some of the talking points. Its report noted that Brian focused the discussion on the broader regulatory landscape, including the updated EU ePrivacy Directive, while panellists and audience questions kept returning to GDPR.

The article noted how the panelists broadly agreed that regulations, including GDPR, helped to improve their organisation’s security posture. It quoted Titta Tajwe, CISO of News UK, who said: “With the EU GDPR, it really helped for executives to understand what needs to happen to protect the data of your customers. So it did allow the CISOs to get the budget they needed to do the work they’d already been asking for, for a long, long time.”

Photos used with kind permission of Mathew Schwartz.

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