Daily Archives: June 11, 2019

1.1M Emuparadise Accounts Exposed in Data Breach

If you’re an avid gamer or know someone who is, you might be familiar with the retro gaming site Emuparadise. This website boasts a large community, a vast collection of gaming music, game-related videos, game guides, magazines, comics, video game translations, and more. Unfortunately, news just broke that Emuparadise recently suffered a data breach in April 2018, exposing the data of about 1.1 million of their forum members.

The operators of the hacked-database search engine, DeHashed, shared this compromised data with the data breach reference site Have I Been Pwned. According to the site’s owner Troy Hunt, the breach impacted 1,131,229 accounts and involved stolen email addresses, IP addresses, usernames, and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes. Password salting is a process of securing passwords by inputting unique, random data to users’ passwords. However, the MD5 algorithm is no longer considered sufficient for protecting passwords, creating cause for cybersecurity concern.

Emuparadise forced a credential reset after the breach occurred in April 2018. It’s important that users of Emuparadise games take steps to help protect their private information. If you know someone who’s an avid gamer, pass along the following tips to help safeguard their security:

  • Change up your password. If you have an Emuparadise account, you should change up your account password and email password immediately. Make sure the next one you create is strong and unique so it’s more difficult for cybercriminals to crack. Include numbers, lowercase and uppercase letters, and symbols. The more complex your password is, the better!
  • Keep an eye out for sketchy emails and messages. Cybercriminals can leverage stolen information for phishing emails and social engineering scams. If you see something sketchy or from an unknown source in your email inbox, be sure to avoid clicking on any links provided.
  • Check to see if you’ve been affected. If you or someone you know has made an Emuparadise account, use this tool to check if you could have been potentially affected.

And, of course, to stay updated on all of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, follow me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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CCPA is a Shiny Object

The California Consumer Protection Act has gotten a lot of attention recently and rightly so. It is, however, just one of a number of US state privacy legislation initiatives that have either recently been passed or is under consideration. Consider the Maine Act to Protect the Privacy of Online Consumer Information. This law requires that […]

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Say So Long to Robocalls

For as long as you’ve had a phone, you’ve probably experienced in one form or another a robocall. These days it seems like they are only becoming more prevalent too. In fact, it was recently reported that robocall scams surged to 85 million globally, up 325% from 2017. While these scams vary by country, the most common type features the impersonation of legitimate organizations — like global tech companies, big banks, or the IRS — with the goal of acquiring user data and money. When a robocall hits, users need to be careful to ensure their personal information is protected.

It’s almost impossible not to feel anxious when receiving a robocall. Whether the calls are just annoying, or a cybercriminal uses the call to scam consumers out of cash or information, this scheme is a big headache for all. To combat robocalls, there has been an uptick in apps and government intervention dedicated to fighting this ever-present annoyance. Unfortunately, things don’t seem to be getting better — while some savvy users are successful at avoiding these schemes, there are still plenty of other vulnerable targets.

Falling into a cybercriminal’s robocall trap can happen for a few reasons. First off, many users don’t know that if they answer a robocall, they may trigger more as a result. That’s because, once a user answers, hackers know there is someone on the other end of the phone line and they have an incentive to keep calling. Cybercriminals also have the ability to spoof numbers, mimic voices, and provide “concrete” background information that makes them sound legitimate. Lastly, it might surprise you to learn that robocalls are actually perfectly legal. It starts to become a grey area, however, when calls come through from predatory callers who are operating on a not-so-legal basis.

While government agencies, like the Federal Communications Commission and Federal Trade Commission, do their part to curb robocalls, the fight to stop robocalls is far from over, and more can always be done. Here are some proactive ways you can say so long to pesky scammers calling your phone.

  1. There’s an app for that. Consider downloading the app Robokiller that will stop robocalls before you even pick up. The app’s block list is constantly updating, so you’re protected.
  2. Let unknown calls go to voicemail. Unless you recognize the number, don’t answer your phone.
  3. Never share personal details over the phone. Unfortunately, there’s a chance that cybercriminals may have previously obtained some of your personal information from other sources to bolster their scheme. However, do not provide any further personal or financial information over the phone, like SSNs or credit card information.
  4. Register for the FCC’s “Do Not Call” list. This can help keep you protected from cybercriminals and telemarketers alike by keeping your number off of their lists.
  5. Consider a comprehensive mobile security platform. Utilize the call blocker capability feature from McAfee Mobile Security. This tool can help reduce the number of calls that come through.

Interested in learning more about IoT and mobile security trends and information? Follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and ‘Like” us on Facebook.

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Security roundup: June 2019

Every month, we dig through cybersecurity trends and advice for our readers. This edition: GDPR+1, the cost of cybercrime revealed, and a ransomware racket.

If you notice this notice…

If year one of GDPR has taught us anything, it’s that we can expect more data breach reports, which means more notifications. Most national supervisory authorities saw an increase in queries and complaints compared to 2017, the European Data Protection Board found.

But are companies following through with breach notifications that are effective, and easy to understand? Possibly not. Researchers from the University of Michigan analysed 161 sample notifications using readability guidelines, and found confusing language that doesn’t clarify whether consumers’ private data is at risk.

The researchers had previously found that people often don’t take action after being informed of a data breach. Their new findings suggest a possible connection with poorly worded notifications. That’s why the report recommends three steps for creating more usable and informative breach notifications.

  • Pay more attention to visual attractiveness (headings, lists and text formatting) and visually highlight key information.
  • Make the notice readable and understandable to everyone by using short sentences, common words (and very little jargon), and by not including unnecessary information.
  • Avoid hedge terms and wording claims like “there is no evidence of misuse”, because consumers could misinterpret this as as evidence of absence of risk).

AT&T inadvertently gave an insight into its own communications process after mistakenly publishing a data breach notice recently. Vice Motherboard picked up the story, and pointed out that its actions would have alarmed some users. But it also reckoned AT&T deserves praise for having a placeholder page ready in case of a real breach. Hear, hear. At BH Consulting, we’re big advocates of advance planning for potential incidents.

The cost of cybercrime, updated

Around half of all property crime is now online, when measured by volume and value. That’s the key takeaway from a new academic paper on the cost of cybercrime. A team of nine researchers from Europe and the USA originally published work on this field in 2012 and wanted to evaluate what’s changed. Since then, consumers have moved en masse to smartphones over PCs, but the pattern of cybercrime is much the same.

The body of the report looks at what’s known about the various types of crime and what’s changed since 2012. It covers online card frauds, ransomware and cryptocrime, fake antivirus and tech support scams, business email compromise, telecoms fraud along with other related crimes. Some of these crimes have become more prominent, and there’s also been fallout from cyberweapons like the NotPetya worm. It’s not all bad news: crimes that infringe intellectual property are down since 2012.

Ross Anderson, professor of security engineering at Cambridge University and a contributor to the research, has written a short summary. The full 32-page study is free to download as a PDF here.

Meanwhile, one expert has estimated fraud and cybercrime costs Irish businesses and the State a staggering €3.5bn per year. Dermot Shea, chief of detectives with the NYPD, said the law is often behind criminals. His sentiments match those of the researchers above. They concluded: “The core problem is that many cybercriminals operate with near-complete impunity… we should certainly spend an awful lot more on catching and punishing the perpetrators.” Speaking of which, Europol released an infographic showing how the GozNym criminal network operated, following the arrest of 10 people connected with the gang.

Ransom-go-round

Any ransomware victim will know that their options are limited: restore inaccessible data from backups (assuming they exist), or grudgingly pay the criminals because they need that data badly. The perpetrators often impose time limits to amp up the psychological squeeze, making marks feel like they have no other choice.

Enter third-party companies that claim to recover data on victims’ behalf. Could be a pricey but risk-free option? It turns out, maybe not. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. And that’s just what some top-quality sleuthing by ProPublica unearthed. It found two companies that just paid the ransom and pocketed the profit, without telling law enforcement or their customers.

This is important because ransomware is showing no signs of stopping. Fortinet’s latest Q1 2019 global threat report said these types of attacks are becoming targeted. Criminals are customising some variants to go after high-value targets and to gain privileged access to the network. Figures from Microsoft suggest ransomware infection levels in Ireland dropped by 60 per cent. Our own Brian Honan cautioned that last year’s figures might look good just because 2017 was a blockbuster year that featured WannaCry and NotPetya.

Links we liked

Finally, here are some cybersecurity stories, articles, think pieces and research we enjoyed reading over the past month.

If you confuse them, you lose them: a post about clear security communication. MORE

This detailed Wired report suggests Bluetooth’s complexity is making it hard to secure. MORE

Got an idea for a cybersecurity company? ENISA has published expert help for startups. MORE

A cybersecurity apprenticeship aims to provide a talent pipeline for employers. MORE

Remember the Mirai botnet malware for DDoS attacks? There’s a new variant in town. MORE

The hacker and pentester Tinker shares his experience in a revealing interview. MORE

So it turns out most hackers for hire are just scammers. MORE

The cybersecurity landscape and the role of the military. MORE

What are you doing this afternoon? Just deleting my private information from the web. MORE

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