Monthly Archives: September 2018

Time to Ignite An Intellectual Spark at Microsoft Ignite 2018!

Folks,

This week, thousands of IT professionals, managers, CISOs and CIOs are in Orlando, attending, well, Microsoft Ignite 2018 !

Image Courtesy Microsoft. Source: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/ignite

Now, according to Microsoft's website, Microsoft Ignite has SOLD OUTGreat!  There are 900+ sessions, 100+ instructor-led technology workshops, 60+ Microsoft Immersion workshops, and 50+ hands-on labs with access to expert proctors!


Did I mention that of course, Microsoft's very own experts are also going to be there, and collectively, they covered numerous vital areas such as Securing the Enterprise, Simplified IT Management, Identity‚ Access & Compliance, Enterprise Security etc.


So, with over 1000 sessions, 1000s of attendees, access to "expert proctors", and 100s of Microsoft's very own IT experts, THERE MUST BE AT LEAST ONE PERSON AT MICROSOFT IGNITE who could answer A very SIMPLE QUESTION -


       Question - What's The World's Most Important Active Directory Security Capability?



Now, in case you're wondering why anyone and in fact everyone attending Microsoft Ignite should care about this question, its because in a Microsoft Windows Server based IT Infrastructure, NOT A SINGLE ONE of the numerous vital areas listed above i.e. Securing the Enterprise, Simplified IT Management, Identity‚ Access & Compliance, Enterprise Security etc. etc. can be adequately addressed without FIRST ENSURING THE SECURITY of their foundational Active Directory deployments!


Guess what?!  I'm willing to bet that 99% of experts (let alone attendees) at Microsoft Ignite don't have a clue as to the answer!


Unbelievable, haan?! So much so for a US $ 800 Billion company's  "Sold Out"  IT Conference, where 100s of world renowned IT experts, including Microsoft's finest, were presenting, and where 1000s of IT professionals (including Domain Admins of most Fortune 100 companies) were attending, yet no one likely knows the answer to this most basic of Windows Security questions!


Er, what's that millennial lingo again? Ah yes,  OMG  LOL ROFL !

Doesn't anyone RTM today?  (They don't, and here's likely why.)


On a serious note, if anyone attending Microsoft Ignite 2018 (including Microsoft's own experts) knows the answer to this 1 question, be my guest and answer the question by leaving a comment at the end of that blog post, and you'll earn my respect.


If you don't know the answer, I highly recommend reading, one, two and three, because without knowing the answer to this 1 question (and without possessing this capability,) you cannot secure anything in an Active Directory based Windows network.


Best wishes,
Sanjay

Pardon the Absence, and Get Ready!

Folks,

Hello again. I trust this finds you all doing well. It has been a few weeks since I last blogged. I hope you'll pardon my absence.

Yes I was supposed to answer a rather important question, in fact, possibly the world's most important cyber security question, for the whole world, back in July, but I had to postpone doing so, for a few good reasons, which I may reveal in days to come.

Let's just say that amongst other things (e.g. a rather interesting trip across the Atlantic), I was working on finalising a project that directly impacts cyber security worldwide today, you know, the kind of stuff that even James Bond doesn't have yet!



By the way, speaking of Mr. Bond, as you probably know, I'm a huge fan, so thought I'd share a catchy tune with you -



Oh, that project I was working is almost over (i.e. RC1), so its time for me to get back to blogging, and...     … well, get ready!

Best wishes,
Sanjay

Firewalls and the Need for Speed

I was looking for resources on campus network design and found these slides (pdf) from a 2011 Network Startup Resource Center presentation. These two caught my attention:



This bothered me, so I Tweeted about it.

This started some discussion, and prompted me to see what NSRC suggests for architecture these days. You can find the latest, from April 2018, here. Here is the bottom line for their suggested architecture:






What do you think of this architecture?

My Tweet has attracted some attention from the high speed network researcher community, some of whom assume I must be a junior security apprentice who equates "firewall" with "security." Long-time blog readers will laugh at that, like I did. So what was my problem with the original recommendation, and what problems do I have (if any) with the 2018 version?

First, let's be clear that I have always differentiated between visibility and control. A firewall is a poor visibility tool, but it is a control tool. It controls inbound or outbound activity according to its ability to perform in-line traffic inspection. This inline inspection comes at a cost, which is the major concern of those responding to my Tweet.

Notice how the presentation author thinks about firewalls. In the slides above, from the 2018 version, he says "firewalls don't protect users from getting viruses" because "clicked links while browsing" and "email attachments" are "both encrypted and firewalls won't help." Therefore, "since firewalls don't really protect users from viruses, let's focus on protecting critical server assets," because "some campuses can't develop the political backing to remove firewalls for the majority of the campus."

The author is arguing that firewalls are an inbound control mechanism, and they are ill-suited for the most prevalent threat vectors for users, in his opinion: "viruses," delivered via email attachment, or "clicked links."

Mail administrators can protect users from many malicious attachments. Desktop anti-virus can protect users from many malicious downloads delivered via "clicked links." If that is your worldview, of course firewalls are not important.

His argument for firewalls protecting servers is, implicitly, that servers may offer services that should not be exposed to the Internet. Rather than disabling those services, or limiting access via identity or local address restrictions, he says a firewall can provide that inbound control.

These arguments completely miss the point that firewalls are, in my opinion, more effective as an outbound control mechanism. For example, a firewall helps restrict adversary access to his victims when they reach outbound to establish post-exploitation command and control. This relies on the firewall identifying the attempted C2 as being malicious. To the extent intruders encrypt their C2 (and sites fail to inspect it) or use covert mechanisms (e.g., C2 over Twitter), firewalls will be less effective.

The previous argument assumes admins rely on the firewall to identify and block malicious outbound activity. Admins might alternatively identify the activity themselves, and direct the firewall to block outbound activity from designated compromised assets or to designated adversary infrastructure.

As some Twitter responders said, it's possible to do some or all of this without using a stateful firewall. I'm aware of the cool tricks one can play with routing to control traffic. Ken Meyers and I wrote about some of these approaches in 2005 in my book Extrusion Detection. See chapter 5, "Layer 3 Network Access Control."

Implementing these non-firewall-based security choices requries a high degree of diligence, which requires visibility. I did not see this emphasized in the NSRC presentation. For example:


These are fine goals, but I don't equate "manageability" with visibility or security. I don't think "problems and viruses" captures the magnitude of the threat to research networks.

The core of the reaction to my original Tweet is that I don't appreciate the need for speed in research networks. I understand that. However, I can't understand the requirement for "full bandwidth, un-filtered access to the Internet." That is a recipe for disaster.

On the other hand, if you define partner specific networks, and allow essentially site-to-site connectivity with exquisite network security monitoring methods and operations, then I do not have a problem with eliminating firewalls from the architecture. I do have a problem with unrestricted access to adversary infrastructure.

I understand that security doesn't exist to serve itself. Security exists to enable an organizational mission. Security must be a partner in network architecture design. It would be better to emphasize enhance monitoring for the networks discussed above, and think carefully about enabling speed without restrictions. The NSRC resources on the science DMZ merit consideration in this case.

“Your Secure DevOps Questions Answered”

  As SANS prepares for the 2nd Annual Secure DevOps Summit, Co-Chairs Frank Kim and Eric Johnson are tackling some of the common questions they get from security professionals who want to understand how to inject security into the DevOps pipeline, leverage leading DevOps practices, and secure DevOps technologies and cloud services. If you are … Continue reading Your Secure DevOps Questions Answered