Monthly Archives: December 2011

How to really protect your privacy on Facebook

It’s not just you. A lot of people are concerned about their privacy on Facebook. Some are worried about being tracked, even when they aren’t logged in. Some are worried about unintentionally sharing private information or opinions that can threaten their reputation or relationships. Others worry about exposing the private data on their machine through some tricky attack.

As Facebook’s new Timeline is being introduced now is the perfect time to think about how you use Facebook. We have given you 3 things to do before you activate Facebook’s new Timeline. We hope you’ll take those steps to review what you have and will be sharing and with whom. What more can you do?

You use smart passwords and have your PC patched and protected. You know, of course, the most important privacy feature on Facebook is the ‘Post’ button. If you make a point of NEVER sharing anything that you wouldn’t want your grandmother or your worst enemy to see publicly, you’re off to a good start.

 But what extra step can you take prevent invasive tracking and protect the private data on your computer?

Here’s what Sean from F-Secure Labs recommends: Do all of your social networking in a one browser. Use one browser exclusively for “public” behavior. Then use a separate browser for all of your private banking, shopping and viewing. This strategy helps you avoid worries about tracking and information bleeding between your private and public lives.

Want to be even safer? Use a dedicated machine for your social activity. This is an extremely wise strategy if you use your PC to manage your finances and or business.

An added advantage to using a ‘public’ browser or PC for your social networking is that you’ll constantly remind yourself that what you share online stays online.

So we want to know. What do you think of Facebook’s new Timeline?

Cheers,

Jason

The Cryptographic Doom Principle

When it comes to designing secure protocols, I have a principle that goes like this: if you have to perform any cryptographic operation before verifying the MAC on a message you’ve received, it will somehow inevitably lead to doom.

Your app shouldn’t suffer SSL’s problems

From Swindle To Hazard

In recent months, Comodo has been hacked repeatedly, DigiNotar was compromised, and the security of CAs as a whole has been found to be not altogether inspiring. The consensus finally seems to be shifting from the notion that CAs are merely a ripoff, to the notion that they are a ripoff, a security problem, and that we want them dead as immediately as possible. The only question that remains is how to replace them.

EU – Coalition of top tech & media companies to make internet better place for kids

(RAPID)
28 leading companies have come together to form a new Coalition to make a better and safer internet for children. Put together by the Commission, founding Coalition members are: Apple, BSkyB, BT, Dailymotion, Deutsche Telekom, Facebook, France Telecom-Orange, Google, Hyves, KPN, Liberty Global, LG Electronics, Mediaset, Microsoft, Netlog, Nintendo, Nokia, Opera Software, Research in Motion, RTL Group, Samsung, Sulake, Telefonica, TeliaSonera, Telenor Group, Tuenti, Vivendi, Vodafone. Priority actions include making it easier to report harmful content, ensuring privacy settings are age-appropriate, and offering wider options for parental control, reflecting the needs of a generation that is going online at an increasingly young age.